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Town of 
Wilmington 
Annual Report 

1996 




IN MEMORIAM 



OLIVER "AL" ARUDA 
JOSEPH P. BEATON 
GLADYS M. BELBIN 
AUGUSTUS "GUS" BLAISDELL 
WILLIAM F. LEO CAMPBELL 
DOMINIC DEGRAZIA 
MARY E. DENAULT 
HELEN T. DOHERTY 

LOUIS E. GAGE 
HAROLD F. GARRETT 

JOHN R. HARVEY 
MARGARET IMBIMBO 
HOWARD I. LAFAVER 
DR. RALPH LEPORE 
FRANCIS A. OTTATI 
JAMES J. RUSSO 

CAROL SEARS 
THORA F. SMITH 



The winter of 1996 was the snowiest ever recorded by the Town of 
Wilmington. The year 1996 also marked the Tenth Anniversary of the 
opening of the Buzzell Senior Center. On this special occasion the town 
again salutes the many senior citizens and volunteers who worked so hard 
to make the dream come true. 



(front cover) 



Buzzell Senior Center 




Table of Contents 

Title Page 

Accepted Streets 40 

ADA Advisory Committee 66 

Animal Control Officer 29 

Board of Appeals 67 

Board of Assessors 18 

Board of Health 46 

Board of Registrars 21 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 9 

Cable T.V. Advisory Task Force 45 

Carter Lecture Fund 55 

Constable 21 

Council for the Arts 73 

Department of Public Works 77 

Directory of Officials 8 

Disabilities, Commission on 65 

Elderly Services Commission 63 

Fire Department 22 

Historical Commission 54 

Housing Authority 49 

Housing Partnership 38 

Inspector of Buildings 30 

Library 6 

Meeting Dates and Times 163 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 76 

Middlesex Canal Commission 45 

Mission Statement 1 

Municipal Services Guide 13 

Officers & Department Heads 12 

Permanent Building Committee 55 

Planning/Conservation Department 32 

Police Department • 25 

Public Buildings Department 55 

Recreation Commission 57 

Redevelopment Authority 4 5 

Sealer of Weights and Measurers 66 

School Department 84 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School 98 

Telephone Directory by Department 164 

Tovm Accountant 141 

Tovm Clerk 19 

Tovm Collector/Treasurer 17 

Town Counsel 50 

Tovm Manager 4 

Tovm Meetings. . . . Presidential Primary - March 5, 1996 101 

Annual Tovm Election - April 20, 1996 102 

Annual Tovm Meeting - April 27, 1996 103 

State Primary - September 17, 1996 124 

Recount County Comm. - September 30, 1996 127 

Special Tovm Meeting - October 28, 1996 128 

State Election - November 5, 1996 137 

Recount Rep. in Congress -'November 26, 1996. . . . 139 

Veterans' Services 5 9 

Water &. Sevs^er Department 8 




The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 



"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 
Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion must 
govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the Town. 
Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important 
resource and the key to its success in serving the people of 
Wilmington . " 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



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During 1996 the Board of Selectmen has been actively involved with a number of 
proposals related to future development in Wilmington. 

At the direction of the Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board a Master 
Plan Advisory Committee has been established. Its purpose is to evaluate the 
relevance of the Comprehensive General Plan developed for the town in 1970 as 
a planning tool for guiding the towns future growth and development. The 
committee is expected to provide a final report to the Board in 1997. 

The Town Center Committee has been re-established to follow up on the 
recommendations presented in the 1992 Land Use Corridor Redevelopment Study of 
Route 3 8 and in general to take a comprehensive view of how to improve the 
commercial vitality and physical character of the Town Center. 

In an effort to improve the appearance of the Town Center area the Board has 
explored the feasibility of placing aerial utilities underground. After 
holding discussions with representatives from New England Telephone and 
Reading Municipal Light Department it appears that such a proposal is cost 
prohibitive unless funding sources apart from the general tax levy can be 
used . 

At year's end, the Board learned that the Massachusetts Highway Department had 
selected a contractor to reconstruct the Route 62 bridge. It is anticipated 
that construction to widen the bridge and improve the intersection of Routes 
62 and 38 will commence in late spring of 1997. 

Discussions are ongoing with the MBTA concerning plans for increased parking 
for a commuter rail station in the Town Center. The Board of Selectmen 
supports a proposal for the establishment of an expanded commuter rail 
facility combined with municipal parking and mixed use commercial development 
for the Town Center. The Board is awaiting word from the MBTA concerning 
their draft proposal and the timing for such a project. 

Selectmen believe that Wilmington residents should have greater access to 
public transportation. The MBTA bus system stops at the Wilmington/Woburn 
town line while the Lowell Regional Transit Authority bus system stops at the 
Wilmington/Tewksbury town line. The Board has entered into discussions with 
both public entities to determine feasible options for providing Wilmington 
residents with access to the regional bus systems. 

In recognition of the severe space constraints in the schools and in some 
general government buildings Archetype Architecture, a consulting firm 
specializing in facilities planning, was hired to evaluate the existing gap 
between space needs and space availability and to present recommended 
solutions. The consultant has been working with the Permanent Building 
Committee and the Town Manager to develop final recommendations. 



The Municipal Golf Course/Recreation Area Feasibility Study Committee was 
appointed to investigate the merits of developing a municipal golf course in 
Wilmington. Committee members have considered town property and private 
property off Salem Street and the Town Forest property located off of Andover 
Street. Preliminary costs projections range from $2.7 million to $5.4 million 
for development of a golf course. The Board is awaiting a final 
recommendation from the committee before deciding whether or not to pursue 
such a proposal . 

Other initiatives being pursued by the Board include the reuse of the former 
John T. Berry Rehabilitation Center, a heavy commercial vehicle exclusion for 
Andover/Woburn Streets, funding for gates at ungated rail crossings in 
Wilmington and cable license renewal. 

The Board of Selectmen adopted a policy in conjunction with the issuance of 
common victualer licenses that would mandate appropriate accessibility to 
businesses requiring such licenses. This policy was drafted in cooperation 
with the Commission on Disabilities. 

The Board wishes to express its sincere thanks to those who made donations to 
the town in 1996. Osco Drug Store donated $10,000 to improve traffic flow on 
Route 38. Milton Hefferon presented the Board with a donation of $8,655 to be 
used for reconstruction of the ballfields behind the Town Hall. Shawsheen 
River Estates donated a parcel of land off of Lord' s Court for conservation 
purposes . 

In closing we wish to acknowledge the fine work of town employees and 
volunteers who have dedicated their energies to improving the quality of life 
in Wilmington. 




Left to right: Selectman Michael J. Newhouse. Selectman Robert J. Cam, Chairman 
James J. Rooney (seated). Selectman Daniel C. Wandell and Selectman Michael V. McCoy. 



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Town of Wilmington 

121 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON. MA 01887 



OFFICE OF THE FAX (508) 658-3334 

TOWN MANAGER TTY (508) 694 1417 

(508) 658-3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

Growing Pains. In a recent issue of the town's municipal newsletter, I 
commented on what clearly is Wilmington's greatest challenge. An examination 
of the town's 1996 agenda reveals a community intent upon meeting the needs of 
its growing population. The town is taking positive strides toward mitigating 
the pains of growth. Residents have supported town government's efforts to 
meet current needs and they have enabled the town to prepare for its future. 

I am pleased to report that town government continues to make significant 
improvement to its financial condition. Despite more residents, more 
students, more roadways, more mandates and in 1996, more snow, the town is in 
its best financial condition of the last decade. The town has been able to 
meet the needs of a residential population that has grown by 12% in two years 
because we have followed a deliberately conservative fiscal plan. More 
importantly, the town is financially prepared to meet future needs which 
includes providing for an estimated 1,000 new students over the next ten 
years . 

Early in 1996, I reported for the first time in five years that the town 
experienced a positive free cash position in the amount of $213,729.00. On 
the surface this appeared to be a modest achievement. In fact, this position 
was achieved despite years of outstanding tax liabilities which placed the 
town in a negative free cash position of more than $1.5 million. Today, the 
town's positive free cash position, as certified by the Department of Revenue, 
is $1,062,798.00. This figure does not include more than $255,000.00 in the 
town's capital stabilization fund or surplus funds that have been generated 
through the Water Department in the amount of $840,000.00. 

During 1996 the town, through its Permanent Building Committee, conducted a 
comprehensive review of its school and municipal facilities. The results 
confirmed the need to increase space for schools and public safety. At year's 
end, the recommendation of the committee is for the town to begin an initial 
phase of facility expansion that would service the needs of the School 
Department by building a new comprehensive middle school on available town- 
owned land at the West Intermediate/Boutwell School complex. A new middle 
school would enable the town to convert the current intermediate schools to 
elementary schools and would further solve the space crunch throughout the 
system for the foreseeable future. 

The committee has also determined the police and fire stations to be woefully 
inadequate for a community the size of Wilmington. The public safety 
buildings need to be upgraded in order to meet health and safety requirements, 
to accommodate new technology and to meet the demands of increased 
responsibilities due to an expanding residential and work force base. The 
initial phase of the committee's recommendation proposes the construction of a 
joint police and fire facility at the police station/playground site at the 
corner of Church and Adelaide Streets . 



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For several years I have asserted the importance of improving the tovm's 
financial position in anticipation of the need to move forward with a major 
facility improvement program. The town, in my estimation, has reached the 
necessary financial position to implement this program. Town government, 
however, is comprised of more than just elected and appointed officials and 
employees. The most important partner in town government is the voter. As a 
municipality governed by town meeting, Wilmington voters are entrusted with 
direct responsibility for determining their community's path. Voters at the 
1997 Annual Town Meeting will decide the fate of these two projects. 

Wilmington's 1996 Annual Report includes detailed summaries from town agencies 
that undertook the responsibility for providing essential services, 
establishing new programs and enhancing existing offerings. Two programs that 
were adopted in 1995 became a reality this past year. The Senior Citizen Tax 
Work Off Program which began in January of 1996 met initial success. Voters 
approved a second phase of funding in April and, as a result, thirty 
"positions" have been made available to senior citizen property owners 
interested in reducing their real estate taxes by working part-time for the 
town. Voters in 1995 also authorized the establishment of the Town of 
Wilmington Scholarship Fund. This new program, funded by the generosity of 
Wilmington property owners, provided financial aid to three deserving 
graduates from Wilmington High School's Class of 1996. 

In addition to identifying solutions for the town's space needs, several 
important initiatives began which were designed to improve government 
services. They included: 

* The establishment of a Stream Maintenance Program designed to 
reduce flooding and to restore and maintain the quality of stream 
channels by cleaning accumulated debris, obstructions and silt 
from the town's streams and wetlands. 

* The relocation and expansion of polling places to better 
accommodate the voting public. 

* The establishment of a full-time Computer Systems Administrator 
responsible for overseeing and coordinating the maintenance and 
administration of the town's management information system and 
data processing services. 

* An improved police dispatch service through an upgrade in the 
Police Department computer aided dispatch system and the hiring of 
three civilian dispatchers through the Federal COPS MORE Program. 

* The enhancement of the Fire Safety Education Program for the 
schools through the award of a SAFE Grant. 

* The establishment of a Small Business Revolving Loan Program and 
the re-establishment of the town's Employment Assistance Program 
as a result of a $400,000.00 Community Development Block Grant. 

* The newly established Title V Community Septic Management Program 
designed to assist homeowners repair and upgrade their septic 
discharge systems. 

In 1996, the town updated its capital equipment and continued to invest in its 
important assets by maintaining and repairing town buildings and 
infrastructure. The town purchased replacement vehicles for the Police and 
Fire Departments as well as maintenance, service and construction trucks for 
the Public Buildings and Public Works Departments. Town Meeting further 
authorized the appropriation of $180,000.00 for a new fire engine pumper which 
will be delivered to the town in 1997. 

The town made several improvements to recreational, school and municipal 
facilities during 1996. Among those were: 

* The renovation of the tennis and basketball courts at the Boutwell 
and Wildwood Schools. 



-5- 



* The relocation of the driveway at the Shawsheen School to allow 
for improved traffic flow and to better accommodate the safety- 
needs of the students. 

* The replacement of the main sections of the roof at the Old West 
School House. 

* The rehabilitation of the historic Town Pound. 

* The upgrade of the fire alarm system at the Boutwell School. 

* Renovations to the Library to improve public access. 

* The installation of a new section of roof at the Woburn Street 
School . 

* The installation of new windows at the Wildwood School. 

* The installation of new chlorinators at the Butters Row Water 
Treatment Plant. 

* The cleaning and refurbishing of several town wells. 

* The establishment of a water main replacement program. 

* The completion of the upgrade to the Town Hall fields through the 
installation of an irrigation system, the hydroseeding and 
regrading of the fields and the installation of fencing and player 
benches . 

In addition, the town has nearly completed its reconstruction efforts to the 
fields at the Woburn Street School where an irrigation system has been 
installed and the fields have been regraded. 

Recognizing the importance of protecting and improving the town's water and 
sewer infrastructure, Town Meeting members gave approval to the Route 38 
Corridor Sewer Project and authorized the design and construction of a raw 
water main from the Shawsheen Avenue Pump Station to the Butters Row Water 
Treatment Plant. 

Ratepayers received a 13% decrease in their water and sewer bills. The new 
water rate, $2.46 per 100 cubic feet, is the lowest water rate since 1988. 
The sewer rate, which was reduced for the fourth consecutive year, dropped 
$.41 to $2.70 per 100 cubic feet. The new sewer rate is the lowest since 
1990 . 

Businesses continued to expand and relocate to the Town of Wilmington. 
Available commercial space is at a premium. In October of 1996, Koch Membrane 
Systems expanded their Wilmington operations by opening a new manufacturing 
building on Main Street adjacent to their present site. Altron completed a $1 
million addition to their Wilmington facility. Frito Lay opened a warehouse 
and distribution facility on a 17 acre parcel on Ballardvale Street. 
Solectria Corporation, an electric car manufacturer, opened a new facility on 
Industrial Way. PGA Realty Trust broke ground to mark the start of 
infrastructure construction for Upton Technology Park. At year's end, the 
first of three buildings to be built on this 37 acre industrial park neared 
completion. These are just a few of the examples that highlight Wilmington's 
vitality in the area of commercial and business activity. 

1996 marked the tenth anniversary of the Buzzell Senior Citizen Center. 
Local, state and federal officials joined a large and spirited contingent of 
Wilmington senior citizens to recount the Center's history and to pay tribute 
to the massive volunteer effort that culminated with the Center's 1986 
opening. Today, Wilmington's Elderly Services Department provides a variety 
of social, therapeutic and outreach programs and the Center remains the focal 
point for these services. 

The volunteers who worked diligently to establish the Senior Citizen Center 
exemplify the commitment and dedication of so many Wilmington residents. 
Volunteers are the underpinning for any successful organization. Wilmington 
is fortunate that so many of its residents willingly volunteer their time, 
money and effort to lift a spirit, to fill a breach or to further a cause. 
People like Milton Heffron who donated almost $9,000 to refurbish the Town 
Hall fields, Joe Paglia who served 31 years on the Board of Health and the 



-6- 



countless number of parents who give of their time so that youngsters can 
enjoy recreational opportunities represent the core of our community. This 
past year several longtime committee members stepped down from their important 
posts. We are grateful for the services of Finance Committee member Dick 
Duggan, Water and Sewer Commissioner Neil Waisnor and Audrey Riddle, who 
served as Chairman of the Board of Registrars. The town will also miss the 
leadership of Larry Curtis, former Chairman of the Commission on Disability, 
whose advocacy for the disabled prodded town government to do the right thing. 

Four dedicated town employees retired in 1996. Michael "Mickey" McKenna, a 
Detective in the Wilmington Police Department provided 27 years of law 
enforcement service to his community. Margaret "Peg" Perry worked 10 years as 
a Traffic Supervisor prior to becoming a Senior Clerk in 1974, serving as an 
indispensable assistant to a grateful Police Department. Fred Miller retired 
from the Public Buildings Department after 11 years of service. Sarah "Sally" 
Reuter retired as the Director of the Wilmington Memorial Library. Sally was 
a valuable Department Head who served 23 years as Children's Services 
Librarian before her promotion to Library Director in 1994. Christina 
Stewart, Reference and Adult Services Librarian and a member of the Library 
staff for 22 years was appointed Library Director. 

As town officials and town employees, we are mindful of the responsibility 
entrusted in us to serve the common good. Henry Clay may have best 
articulated the role of government and its purpose when he said, "Government 
is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees; and both the 
trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people." 

Respectfully submitted. 




Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 




Town Manager Michael Caira and Selectmen Daniel Wandell, Robert Cain and Michael McCoy take 
part in the Memorial Day Parade. 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1997 



Board of Selectmen 



James J. Rooney, Chairman 
Robert J. Cain 
Daniel C. Wandell 
Michael V. McCoy 
Michael J. Newhouse 



1998 
1997 
1998 
1999 
1999 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



1997 



School Committ e e 



Paul R. Palizzolo, Chairman 
Robert W. Young, Vice Chairman 
Judson W. Miller, Secretary 
Suzanne L. Clarkin 
Madeleine A. Leger 
Robert E . Surran 
Barbara K. Breakey 



1998 
1999 
1998 
1997 
1997 
1997 
1999 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty III, Vice Chairman 

Steven W. Leet, Secretary 

Robert D. Ennis 

William A. Cole 

John M. Walsh 

Ann Yurek 

Anthony E . Krzeminski 
Barry J. Mulholland 



1997 
1999 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1998 
1998 
1999 
1999 



-a- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1996 



Term 
Expires 

Appeals, Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 1999 
Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 1997 
Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 1998 
Anita H. Backman, Assoc. 1997 
Robert L. Doucette, Assoc. 1997 
John R. Forrest, Assoc. 1997 

Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 

Michael P. Niestepski, V. Chmn. 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Secretary 

Joseph Castronovo 

Sandra P. Curtin 

Ruth Kennedy 

Henry C. Latta 

Anne K. Marshall 

Judson W. Miller 

John J. Sullivan 

Michael J. Newhouse (Selectmen Liaison) 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1998 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas . 1997 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec . Sec. 1997 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 1999 

Adele C. Passmore 1998 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Jr., Chmn. 1997 

Bernard P. McMahon 1998 

Willis C. Lyford 1999 



Conservation Commission 
James H. Morris, Chairman 
M. Barbara Sullivan, V. Chmn. 
Jolene S. Lewis 
Richard J. Patterson 
Judith A. Waterhouse 
Lisa A. Brothers 
Steven Finnerty 

Disabilities, Commission On 
Frank A. Botte, Chairman 
Charlotte A. Guthrie 
George B. O'Connell 
Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 
Richard Gage 
Phyllis P. Genetti 



1998 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1998 
1999 
1999 



1998 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1999 
1999 



James J. Rooney (Selectmen Liaison) 



Term 
Expires 

Elderly Services Commission 

Henry C. Latta, Chairman 1998 

Joseph C. Filipowicz, V. Chmn. 1998 

Evelyn T. Kaminski 1997 

Grace Kirkland 1997 

Thomas J. Barrasso 1998 

Marilyn K. McCarthy 1999 

Joseph A. Paglia 1999 

Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Gregory P. Erickson 

Robert P. Palmer 

Michael Morris 

Michael J. Woods 

Bobby N. Stewart 

Daniel W. Paret 

Roger J. Lessard 

Health, Board of 

James A. Ficociello, Chairman 1998 

Milton E. Calder, Sr. 1997 

Stephen P. Peterson 1999 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 1999 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treasurer 1998 

Frank J. West 1997 

Paul L. Chalifour 1998 

Kathleen Black Reynolds 1998 

Jean M. Rowe 1999 

James T. Murray 1999 

Housing Authority 

Dorothy A. Butler, Chairperson 1998 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr., V. Chmn. 1997 
Charles R. Fiore, Jr., Treasurer 1998 
Robert DiPasquale*, Asst. Treas. 1998 

Melvin F. Keough, Secretary 2001 
♦State Appointee 

Housing Partnership 

Mark T. Haldane, Chairman 1997 

Raymond G. Forest, V. Chmn. 1997 

Charles E. Boyle 1997 

Michael A. Caira 1997 

Gregory P. Erickson 1997 

James A. Ficociello 1997 

Carole S. Hamilton 1997 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. 1997 

Daniel W. Paret 1997 

Rev. Herbert Taylor 1997 

Daniel C. Wandell 1997 

Lester E. White 1997 
Lynn Goonin Duncan, Director 

Library Trustees 

Martha K. Stevenson, Chairman 1998 

Anne Buzzell, Vice Chairman 1999 

Patricia F. Duggan 1997 

Kenneth J. Miller 1997 

Mary Deislinger 1998 

James F. Banda 1999 



-9- 




Boards, Committees & Commissions 1996 



Term 
Expires 

Permanent Building Committee 
Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 1999 
Paul J. Melaragni 1997 
Joseph A. Langone 1997 
Randi R. Holland 1998 
Mark. T. Haldane 1999 

Plannincr Board 

Carole S. Hamilton, Chairman 1997 

James L. Diorio, Clerk 2001 

Austin L. Rounds 1998 

Michael A. Roache 1999 

Karen L. Metcalfe 2000 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 1997 

C. Michael Burns, V. Chairman 1999 

James J. Buckley, Secretary 1997 

Larry G. Noel 1998 

Jay Tighe 1998 

Recycling Advisory Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Kevin Brander 

Elizabeth D. Harriman 

Anne C. Leary 

Thomas A. Ollila 

Joseph A. Paglia 

Robert P. Palmer 

Rev. Judy Thomson 

Edwin P. Tripp, III 

Redevelopment Authority 

Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman 1998 

Charles N. Gilbert, V. Chrmn. 2001 

Patricia F. Duggan*, Treasurer 1998 

John H. Creeth, Secretary 1998 

John Ritchie 1997 
Michael N. Matt, Consultant 
* State Appointment 

Regional Vocational Technical School 
Committee 

James M. Gillis 1997 

Robert G. Peterson 1998 

Registrars, Board of 

Barbara J. Buck, Chairman 1998 
Alice M. Hooper 1997 
Edward L. Sousa 1999 
Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 



Term 
Expires 



Town Center Committee 

Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 

Raymond G. Forest, Vice Chairman 

Diane M. Allan 

Noel D. Baratta, Sr. 

Michael A. Caira 

Rocco V. DePasquale 

James L. Diorio 

Patricia F. Duggan 

Lynn G . Duncan 

Charles N. Gilbert 

Carole S . Hamilton 

Joseph A. Langone 

Richard A. Longo 

Michael N. Matt 

Margaret Quinn 

James J . Rooney 

Town Forest Committee 

Robert P. Palmer, Chairman 1997 

Forrest G. Downs 1999 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Lorraine P. Dineen 1997 

Michael Morris 1997 

Joseph R. Peters 1997 

Unaccepted Ways, Committee On 

Michael A. Roache, Chairman 

Lynn G. Duncan, Secretary 

Silverius J. Blonigen 

Robert J. Cain 

Richard Capone 

Cheryl A. Dunn 

Harold R. Gillam 

Randi R. Holland 

William G. Hooper 

Andrew Kuchinsky 

Robert P. Palmer 

Vincent Scifo 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Noel D. Baratta, Sr., Chairman 1999 

Edwin P. Tripp, III 1997 

Richard A. Longo 1998 



-10- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1996 



Term 
Expires 



Term 
Expires 



WilminQton Arts Council 

David J. Maison, Chairman 1997 

H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 1997 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 1998 

Jane Crane, Rec. Sec. 1997 

Frances Keough, Corr. Sec. 1997 

Annette Campbell 1997 

Bruce E. Jope 1997 

Hinda Paquette 1997 

Francis T. Toohey 1997 

Daniel H. Ballou, Sr. 1998 

Carmelo J. Corsaro 1998 

Marguerite Elia 1998 

Evelyn C. Gibbs 1998 

Edith M. Michelson 1998 

Augustine E. Rice 1998 



Wilmington Election Officers 



Precinct 1 



Annually 



Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clk. 
Clarice J. Ross, Insp. 
Edith Ann Graham, Dep. Insp. 
Priscilla R. Ward, Dep. Insp. 
Joan Goulet, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 4 



Annually 



Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth L. Coville, Dep. Clerk 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Anita Backman, Dep. Insp. 
Lori Stewart, Dep. Insp. 
Dorothy L. Peters, Tally Clerk 



Precinct 2 



Precinct 5 



Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Dep. Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Shirley Pumfrey, Dep. Insp. 



Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Dep. Clerk 
Sandra Curtin, Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Inspector 
Melissa Nobile, Dep. Insp. 
Marion J. Woller, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 3 



Precinct 6 



Mary E. Woods, Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Ruth J. Bedell, Clerk 
Norinne M. Markey, Insp. 
Minnie Kirby, Inspector 
Beverly Vokey, Inspector 
Lorraine Hermann, Dep. Insp. 



Evelyn W. Conlin, Warden 
Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Warden 
Jean M. Draper, Inspector 
Marion C. Murphy, Inspector 
Ada Peters, Dep. Insp. 



-11- 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1997 



Accountant 


Michael Morris 


694-2029 


Administrative Assistant 


Margaret A. Tarantino 


658-3311 


Animal Control/Inspector 


Ellen G. Davis 


658-7845 


Assistant Tovm Manager 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658-3311 


Assessor, Principal 


Humphrey J. (Skip) Moynihan 


658-3675 


Constable 


Charles L. Ellsworth 


658-3078 


Elderly Services Director 


Edith L. Cunningham 


657-7595 


Emergency Management Director 


Daniel R. Stewart 


658-3346 


Finance Director 


Joseph R. Peters 


658-3531 


Pi TP Ch "i p f 






Housing Authority Exec. Director 


Karen DeJoie 


658-7595 


Inspector of Buildings 


Daniel W. Paret 


658-4531 


Ipswich River Watershed Association 


John Keeley 


658-8238 




Herbert D. Nickerson 


658-4207 


Librarian 


Christina A. Stewart 


658-2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 






Authority Advisory Board 


Michael V. McCoy 


658-3311 


Mass. Water Resource Authority 






Advisory Board Rep. 


Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Lynn G. Duncan 


658-8238 


Middlesex County Advisory Board 


Robert J. Cain 


658-4772 


Northeast Solid Waste Committee 


Michael A. Caira 


658-3311 


Planning/Conservation Director 


Lynn G. Duncan 


658-8238 


Plumbing and Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


658-3223 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 


658-5071 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


Roger J. Lessard 


658-3017 


Public Health Director 


Gregory P. Erickson 


658-4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Ann V. FitzGerald, R.N. 


694-2041 


Public Works Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


658-4481 


Reading Municipal Light Department 


Roger J. Lessard 


658-3017 


Advisory Board 


Kenneth Mastrullo 


658-5600 


Recreation Director 


Ronald N. Swasey 


658-4270 


Redevelopment Authority, Consultant 


Michael N. Matt 


657-5649 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


James J. Babineau (617) 


665-8301 


Town Clerk 


Kathleen M. Scanlon 


658-2030 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


658-3388 


Town Engineer 


Harold R. Gillam 


658-4499 


Town Manager 


Michael A. Caira 


658-3311 


Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


694-2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


Wiring Inspector 


Arthur T. Kelley 


658-4531 



-12- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2nd & 4th Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the Town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. Phone 658-3311 



James J. Rooney, Chairman 
Robert J. Cain 
Michael V. McCoy 
Daniel C. Wandell 
Michael J. Newhouse 



Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and recommend 
specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing 
the Town in all litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief 
Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive 
annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on 
behalf of the Town. 



Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the Town's health, workmans 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the Town's recycling program and insuring that the Town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town Manager 
serves as staff director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with 
the preparation of the annual budget and provides general assistance to the 
Town Manager in other areas of municipal administration. 



Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses, and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the Town records the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The Clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 



-13- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



Town Accountant - Michael Morris 



658-2029 



The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve Town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the Town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the Town and prepares other financial records and reports 
as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the 
annual budget . 



Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property 
within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, 
except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, 
agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: (1) the 
valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised from 
property taxation and (3) property classification. 



Finance Director - Joseph R. Peters - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the Town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Finance Director monitors 
the Town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The 
department serves as custodian of all Town funds. All municipal bank accounts 
are controlled by this office. The tax title and foreclosure proceedings for 
non-payment of taxes are handled by the Finance Director. 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation, and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review 
individual proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision 
regulations and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants 
related to planning and development . 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public interest issues 
related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection of 
public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention 
of pollution, protection of fisheries, and protection of land containing 
shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include reviewing and 
inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with the Town and 
State wetlands statutes. In addition the department manages several pieces of 
property throughout Town which have been placed into the Town's custody as 
conservation land. 



-14- 



Building Inspector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors, and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 



Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services 
include restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and 
schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In addition 
the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, 
septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizens 
complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and hazardous 
waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. This includes 
an annual rabies clinic for dogs, and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, 
polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and 
cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In addition the nurse provides home 
health care visits to elderly residents of the Town. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and 
extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety 
inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. All 
outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from the 
Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Fire fighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent patient transport. 



Police Chief - Bobby N. Stewart - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principal responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Superintendent - Robert P. Palmer - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas, and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 
problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the maintenance 
of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is 
responsible for the Town's public shade and ornamental trees and maintenance 
of the trees on the Town common. The Public Works Department is also 
responsible for the operation of the Town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 



-15- 



systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 
by the Water & Sewer Department. The Department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA) . 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program 
for many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and leaf 
disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services for 
all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the Town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete 
set-up at all Town elections and the annual and special town meetings. 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Elderly Services Director - Edith L. Cunningham - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counselling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 



Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library 
seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational library 
services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval . The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-six 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-six 
member towns . 



Recreation Direc i-. or - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots program, summer recreation program for children, ladies fitness, day 
trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and 
a number of other programs. In addition the Recreation Department offers 
resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney World. 



Veterans Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 

The Veteran's Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans 
and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a 
large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of cash grants to 
cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent 
also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other programs 
administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 



-16- 



Town Collector/Treasurer 



COMMITMENTS 



1997 Real Estate 


$26, 


606 , 358 


. 58 


1996 Real Estate 




1, 674 


. 32 


1997 Personal Property 




993 , 793 


. 95 


1 O Q ^ V 1 ^ A 




1, 


757, 329 


. 22 


xyyo EiXcise 






55, 249 


. 10 


1994 Excise 






76 


.25 


1993 Excise 






30 


. 00 


1989 Excise 






15 


. 00 


1988 Excise 






15 


. 00 


Ambulance 






281, 534 


. 00 


Apportioned 


Street Paid in Full 




6,404 


. 2 2 


Interest 






294 


.20 


Apportioned 


Sewer Paid in Full 




1,328 


. 80 


Interest 






514 


.63 


Apportioned 


Street 




2 , 424 


. 22 


Interest 






1, 049 


.23 


Apportioned 


Sewer 




30, 637 


. 94 


Interest 






21,677 


. 76 


Sewer Liens 






27 , 792 


. 89 


Water Liens 






113 , 672 


. 53 


Electric Liens 




6 , 460 


. 75 


TOTAL 




$29, 


908, 332 


. 59 


COLLECTIONS 










Real Estate 




$25, 8 


10, 792 . 


84 



Personal Property- 
Excise 

Water Betterments 
Street Betterments 
Sewer Betterments 
Water Liens 
Sewer Liens 
Interest & Charges 
Ambulance 
Lien Certificates 
Betterment Certificates 
Mark & Clear Fee 
Water Dept Collections 
TOTAL 



991, 393 .40 
1, 703 , 626 . 50 
3, 885.73 
12 , 076 .30 
56 , 444 . 90 
102 , 338 . 74 
28,510.83 
125, 089 . 14 
190 , 463 .69 
28, 352 . 00 
141 . 00 
11, 330 . 00 
5 , 086 ,407.22 
$34, 150, 852 .29 




Gazebo and Town Common in Early Autumn. 



-17- 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1997 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available) 

Total Deficit 

Special Education 

Energy Conservation 

County Retirement Assessment 

County Tax 

Mass . Bay Transportation Authority 
Air Pollution Districts 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Mosquito Control Project 
Amount Certified by Collector & 

Treasurer for Tax Title 
Overlay of Current Year 
Cherry Sheet Offsets 
M. W.R.A 

Final Court Judgements 
RMV Surcharge 



$33, 539, 382 . 00 












175 


00 









1, 032 


982 


00 


45 


989 


00 


412 


986 


00 


5, 


036 


00 


4, 


416 


00 


25, 


609 


00 


26, 


000 


00 


653, 


307 


00 


36, 


457 


00 


1,249, 


681 


00 









10, 


380 


00 



$34, 904 , 050 . 00 



3 . 503 . 018 ■ 00 
$38,407, 068 . 00 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 



1997 Estimated Receipts from Local 
Aid 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Penalties and Interest on Taxes 
Payments in Lieu of Taxes 
Charges for Services - Sewer 
Other Charges for Services 
Fees 
Rentals 

Revolving Fund 

Departmental Revenue - Library 
Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 
Other Department Revenue 
Licenses and Permits 
Special Assessments 
Fines and Forfeits 
Investment Income 
Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 



$4 , 900, 275 . 00 
1, 512, 752 . 00 
100, 000.00 
350, 000 . 00 
1, 669, 668 . 00 
160, 000 . 00 
40, 000 . 00 
6, 000.00 
4,500.00 
10, 000 . 00 
40, 000 . 00 
115, 000.00 
301, 000 . 00 
9, 000 . 00 
170, 000 . 00 
135, 000 . 00 
1, 972 . 00 
1,284,668.00 



10, 809, 835 . 00 
$27, 597, 233 . 00 



REAL ESTATE 



Residential 1,026,531,400 ® 13.18 p/t $13,529,684.00 

Commercial 117,619,200 ® 28.50 p/t 3,352,147.00 

Industrial 341,211,500 @ 28.50 p/t 9,724,528.00 

Personal Property 34,767,510 @ 28.50 p/t 990 , 874 . 00 

$27, 597, 233 . 00 



-18- 



Town Clerk 



vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended: 



Births - Actually recorded for 1996 315 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1996 104 

Marriages recorded for 1996 108 

Deaths recorded for 1996 229 



Chapter 46, Section 15: 



The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and 
registered hospital medical officers applying therefor, blanks for the return 
of births as required by law. 



Chapter 207, Sections 19, 20 & 40: 



Chapter 718, Acts of 1979 made changes to Sections 19 and 20 along with 
Section 4 and as stated before in each annual report anyone intending to 
marry should inquire of this office to see if any changes have been made in 
the laws as they are changing constantly. 



Chapter 207, Section 45: 



This chapter provides for the availability of marriage records. 



Chapter 114, Sections 45, 46: 



One hundred fifty-nine burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as 
Special Agent to the Board of Health for the year. Eighteen out-of-state 
deaths were reported and filed in this office. Thirty-eight Wilmington 
veterans were buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 



Flammable Permits and Registrations: 



Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk. 
Notice is sent to the owner or occupant of land where the storage is located 
on or about April 1st for renewal by April 3 0th of each year. Failure to 
register on time or to comply with the Board's regulations may result in 
revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Seventy- six Flammable 
permits were issued during the year. 



Permits & Recordings : 



Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 524 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 109 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 162 

Federal Lien Recordings 19 

Federal Lien Releases 14 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 496 

Pole & Conduit Locations 13 

Dog Licenses 1202 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 3 



Other Services : 



By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. 
In this capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular 
monthly meeting night, kept the minutes of same up to date, supervised the 
Annual Town Census by mail, kept the voting list up to date, and registered 
voters during the regular office hours of the Town Clerk. She also meets with 
the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify 
nomination papers for candidates. 



-19- 



Town Meetings & Elections 1996: 

Presidential Primary - March 5 

Annual Town Election - April 2 

Annual Town Meeting - April 2 7 

Special Town Meeting - October 28 



State Primary - September 17 
State Election - November 5 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts 
of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted 
in the Town Hall. 



The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32, and supervised the conduct of 
elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 63, 
all in accordance with the Town Charter and Inhabitant By-laws Revised of the 
Town of Wilmington. 

The Board also met many times for certification of signatures on nomination 
papers and assisted at all elections and town meetings. This year they also 
supervised and assisted at two recount elections. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up 
to date with the changing election and census laws. 

The calendar year of 1996 had a total of 12,812 registered voters from our 
listed 20,708 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned 
their census forms in 1996 and answered the By-law Study Committee survey 
without delay. A true census is an asset to the town. 

Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts: 

Presidential Primary February 1, 1996 

Annual Town Meeting and Town Election March 14, 1996 

State Primary August 19, 1996 



Special Town Meeting 
State Election 




October 8, 1996 
October 22, 1996 



f 



West Intermediate School became 
Wilmington's third polling place in 1996. 




-21- 



Fire Department 



It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the 
operations, activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department 
for the year 1996. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five Lieutenants, 
twenty-seven Fire Fighters and two civilian Dispatchers. Fire Fighter George 
Anderson rejoined the department after returning from disability retirement. 
Wilmington resident Bernice "Bunny" Collins continues to volunteer her time by 
entering information into the department data base. Her dedication is an 
inspiration to all of us. The Senior Tax Work Program provided services in 
the areas of small engine repair and data entry. Participants Phyllis 
Scannell and John Dukas are greatly appreciated. The department was saddened 
by the passing of retired Fire Fighter Augustus "Gus" Blaisdell last year. 

The following roster is provided: 

Departmental Roster 

Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Walter J. Sowyrda 

Lieutenants 



Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 
Edmund J. Corcoran, III 

Paul Welch 



John Brown, Jr. 
Joseph T . McMahon 



Robert J. Andersen 
Brian D. Anderson 
George Anderson 
David J. Currier 
Walter R. Daley 
Gary J. Donovan 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 
Kenneth P. Gray 



Fire Fighters 

Richard J. Hughes 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Andrew W. Leverone 
Richard T. McClellan 
John F . McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Alfred W. Meuse 
Christopher J. Nee 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 



Linda K. Abbott 



Christopher G. Pozzi 
Stephen D. Robbins 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P . Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatchers 

Robert L. Seiple 
The department responded to a total of 2,4 99 calls during 1996. 



Residential Buildings 


21 


Vehicles 


55 


Chimney, Fireplaces & 




Brush, Grass or Rubbish 


32 


Woodburning Stoves 


6 


Dumpster 


6 


Out of Town Assistance 


123 


False Alarms 


213 


Fire 


42 


Ambulance /Res cue 


1428 


Ambulance /Rescue 


80 


Service Calls 


559 


Haz Mat 


1 


Hazardous Materials 


7 


Commercial Buildings 


7 


Carbon Monoxide 


42 



Estimated value of property endangered was $20,191,300 
Estimated property loss $521,900 



-22- 



The following is a list of permits issued: 



Black Powder 
Blasting 

Class C Explosive 
Fire Alarm 
Flammable Liquid 
Oil Burner 
Subpoena 
Truck 



5 
32 
1 

125 
6 

142 
2 




Propane 
Report 

Smoke Detector 
Tank 

Miscellaneous 
Sprinkler 

Flammable Decorations 
TOTAL 



44 
50 
195 
77 

2 
53 



734 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, nursing 
homes, and flammable storage were inspected by the Fire Prevention Bureau 
under the direction of Lt . Joseph McMahon. Other inspections listed below: 



Shift personnel inspected 195 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with M. G. L. Ch. 148, Sec. 26F. 

Classroom grades K-5 were visited by fire fighters and discussed various 
safety issues. Fire Fighter Robert Patrie instructed fire prevention at the 
Abundant Life School. 

Community Partnership: Altron Incorporated assisted the department in 
upgrading our self-contained breathing apparatus with the purchase of 2 - 4.5 
air packs . 

CISD - The Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Team responded to requests for 
assistance from other fire departments during periods of crisis. Lt . John 
Brown has taken a leadership role in the program to insure it's effectiveness 
in helping fire fighters and their families. 

LEPC - The Local Emergency Planning Committee continued its mission of 
disaster preparation. One sub group consisting of the Town Manager and 
department heads continued to upgrade the comprehensive emergency response 
plan. Another group consisting of representatives from the business and 
industrial community worked to standardize Tier 2 reporting methods. 

New Fire Station - The Permanent Building Committee reconvened to study the 
need and feasibility of a new fire station in Wilmington. It was determined 
by independent consultants that the need is there and a plan is presently 
being developed to best achieve that goal. 

Safe Grant - The department received $5,500 from the Commonwealth toward fire 
safety education in the school system. The grant was written by Deputy Chief 
Walter Sowyrda and will be implemented by Lt . Joseph McMahon. 

Free Blood Pressure Screening to residents, please call for information. 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Paul Welch reports the following for 1996. All 
circuits and master boxes were tested and repairs made. Multi conductor 
communications cable was extended from the station to the Nynex Tower on Main 
Street. This tower will be the new home of the department's base radio 
station and repeater. There are now 171 master boxes along with 18 street 
boxes for a total of 206 on line. The following 10 master boxes were added to 
the system in 1996 : 



Construction Plans Review 

New Construction, Residential 

New Construction, Industrial 

Fire Inspection, Industrial/Commercial 

Underground Tank Removals 

Underground Tank Installations 

Oil Burner 

Propane 



1261 



38 
1 

142 
44 



98 
95 
18 



-23- 



Iz J4 


^\ 1^ ^1 1 O O ^ T O ^ A A 

usco jj IT uy , zuo riain ijcreet 




Koch Membjrane , 800 Main Street 






T O "3 "a 
J Z J J 




3298 


Analog Devices, 804 Wobum Street 


3416 


Acme Printing, 3 Industrial Way 


5313 


TUnetek, 50 Fordham Road 


6375 


Frito-Lay, Ballardvale Street 


6452 


Shea Concrete, 723 Salem Street 


6611 


Unifirst, 68 Jonspin Road 



Department priorities for the upcoming year include planning to build a new 
fire station, the continued upgrade of apparatus and equipment, improvement of 
in-house training programs and the continued analysis of staffing levels. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff, Assistant 
Town Manager, Department Heads and staff, the Board of Selectmen, and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. 

A very special thank you to the members of the Wilmington Fire Department for 
your support, participation and enthusiasm in providing a well rounded and 
highly professional level of public safety service to the Town of Wilmington. 




During the 4th of July festivities, residents can take part in a "tour" of Wilmington Ladder 1. 



-24- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year of 1996. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 1996; and, for the most 
part, the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police 
Department. During 1996 the total number of complaints and incidents reported 
to the Police Department increased significantly from 9,729 incidents in 1995 
to 14,618 during 1996. While this would appear to be a 50% increase in the 
number of complaints and requests for services received, these are for the 
most part not actual increases, but are, in fact, the result of improved 
records keeping. During 1996 the Police Department increased its incident 
tracking capabilities with an upgraded Computer Aided Dispatch System. The 
E-911 recording equipment and data base installed in December 1995 has also 
augmented the Department's records keeping ability. The employment of three 
Civilian Dispatchers in July 1996, made possible by a Federal Community 
Oriented Policing Grant, has provided for significantly improved data entry. 
It is difficult to determine the exact changes in the number of incidents 
reported; however, there are some indicators which show an increase of 
approximately twenty (20) percent. One such indicator is the number of 
complaints to which cruisers were dispatched. Cruisers were dispatched to 
9,625 complaints during 1996, an increase of 2,211 over the dispatches for 
1995. Several of the serious crime categories increased during 1996. 
Breaking and entering into homes and buildings increased by 4 9% from 72 
incidents in 1995 to 107 during 1996. The department will monitor this trend 
closely, however we are not overly concerned with these numbers. The 
department views this as an adjustment from a sharp decline in these incidents 
over the past five years; and, while they are higher than we would prefer, 
they remain significantly lower than the 199 such incidents in 1989. The 
number of armed robberies remained the same at 2 during 1996. Totals for 
assaults and batteries increased by 14% from 71 in 1995 to 81 in 1996. Motor 
vehicles stolen in Wilmington decreased by 1 from 61 in 1995 to 60 in 1996. 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continues to be a serious 
community problem. During 1996 the Police Department experienced a 22% 
increase in the motor vehicle accident rate. In 1996 motor vehicle accidents 
increased by 157 accidents from 704 accidents in 1995 to 865 during 1996. 
This increase was, to some extent, due to weather conditions during the winter 
months of 1996; however, the department has noted that approximately 6 0% of 
this increase is not weather related, and are most likely the result of motor 
vehicle law violations and roadway hazards. The Police Department has for 
several years placed a high priority on the enforcement of motor vehicle 
violations. During 1996 the department cited 2,205 motor vehicle violations. 
This is a decrease of 592 from the total violations cited during 1995. The 
following are the totals for some of the major areas of concern, speeding 
violations 613, operators license violations 147, unregistered and uninsured 
178; and, miscellaneous violations 1,060. Arrests for operating a motor 
vehicle under the influence of alcohol decreased by 4 from 75 in 1995 to 71 in 
1996 . 

Arrest for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 1996 totaled 415, a 
24% decrease. The Police Department continues to place a high priority on 
alcohol and drug related offenses. During 1996, arrest for liquor law 
violations decreased by 64 from 191 in 1995 to 127 in 1996; and, there were a 
total of 29 narcotics arrests made during 1996. In addition to motor vehicle 
and other criminal arrests, the department placed a total of 157 persons under 
protective custody. A total of 722 persons were taken into custody by the 
Police Department during 1996. 

In 1996 the department completed its second full year of the implementation of 
the Community Policing philosophy. While this is a long term process and 
requires significant changes in attitudes and expectation by both the police 
officers and the community, we have made substantial progress. During 1996 



-25- 



the neighborhood officers responded and followed-up on several hundred problem 
solving assignments in their neighborhoods. In many of these cases they were 
effective in eliminating the problems, and in doing so they have significantly 
reduced the number of repeat calls for those problems. In 1997 the department 
will increase the deployment of the officers into the neighborhoods, not only 
on problem solving assignments, but also at block parties or other 
neighborhood social events, in an effort to ensure that every resident has an 
opportunity to meet with their neighborhood officer. During 1996 all officers 
received additional training in problem solving techniques and in the use of 
bicycle patrols for special events and for directed enforcement efforts for 
chronic problems. In 1996 the department deployed bicycle patrols during the 
Fourth of July activities and throughout the summer in the Silver Lake area on 
weekends and holidays. The department believes that these patrols were very 
effective in reducing habitual problems in this area, and has received 
numerous positive comments from residents. The department's second Citizen 
Police Academy was conducted during 1996 and was viewed a success by both the 
participants and the officer instructors. 




Public Safety personnel respond to traffic accident. 



In 1997 the department will continue and expand our proactive involvement in 
each of the neighborhoods. The department will be conducting two sessions of 
the Citizens Police Academy where residents will be provided insight into how 
the Police Department operates; department policy and procedures in areas of 
interest such as use of force, motor vehicle pursuits, citizen complaints 
etc., and the elements of crimes which must exist before an arrest or 
prosecution is made. Residents will also be provided information regarding the 
Police Department's goals and objectives. As part of our planning for the 
future, the Police Department, working closely with the Citizens Advisory 
Committee, will review the role of the professional police officer in today's 
society; will review the types of incidents which require a priority response 
and those which should be referred to the neighborhood officer; and, how the 
available resources of the department can be more effectively used to address 
the future problems of the Community. 



-26- 



The following is a Departmental Roster of the Neighborhood Officers and their 
assignments . 



Wilmington Police Department 
Community Policing 
Neighborhood Assignments 

Supervisor Area 1 Sergeant James Rooney 

lA. Officer James White IB. Officer David Bradbury 

IC. Officer Paul Chalifour ID. Officer Charles Fiore 

Supervisor Area 2 Sergeant J. Christopher Neville 

2A. Officer Paul Krzeminski 2B. Officer David Axelrod 

2C. Officer Harold Hubby 2D. Officer Francis Hancock 

2E. Officer Joseph Waterhouse 

Supervisor Area 3 Sergeant David McCue 

3A. Officer Joseph Desmond 3B. Officer Stephen Mauriello 

3C. Officer David McCue, Jr. 3D. Officer Thomas McConologue 

Supervisor Area 4 Sergeant Robert Richter 

4A. Officer Paul Jepson 4B. Officer Brian Moon 

4C. Officer Louis Martignetti 4D. Officer John Bossi 

Supervisor Area 5 Sergeant W. Mark Jepson 

5A. Officer David Sugrue 5B. Officer Steven LaRivee 

5C. Officer Lawrence Redding 5D. Officer Jon Shepard 

Business and Commercial Areas 
Lieutenant Robert Spencer 



Area 1 
Area 3 
Area 5 



Det . Thomas Miller Area 2: (To be filled) 

Det. Patrick King Area 4: Det. Michael Celata 

Det. Michael Begonis 



Other members of the department include Deputy Chief Bernard Nally, Lieutenant 
Robert LaRivee, Sergeant William Gable, Patrolmen Chester Bruce, Joseph 
Harris, James Peterson and Robert Shelley, Police Clerk/Matrons Beth Lessard 
and Dawn Ganno and Dispatchers Julie Lambert, April Kingston and George 
O'Connell. The department makes note of personnel changes during 1996. 
Detective Michael J. McKenna retired after 27 years with the department. 
Police Clerk/Matron Margaret Perry retired after 22 years with the department. 
The department thanks Officer McKenna and Margaret Perry for the contributions 
made during their career and wishes both Mike and Peggy health and happiness 
in their retirement. Patrolman Ronald J. Alpers Jr. and Patrolman Anthony 
Fiore were appointed as full time officers. 

In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all boards and committees and all Department Heads and employees 
for their support and cooperation during 1996. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. 



-27- 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics 1996 







MOTOR VFHTPT.P* VTOT .aTTOMQ • 
I'lKj i.\Jms, vdnxv_xj£:i v x.wxji-ix XwIno • 










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ui soj: ae jT-Ly L.onauc u 


1 


c«ncidnge r x ng 


21 







xjcdvc o^ciic IT i.\j^xzi. L.y X'dilldgc 


/ 


j_jci.JL ^diy 






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/ X 




n 


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1 
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iNon,/ oLippoiL C 






o one 




n 

V 






Receiving Stolen Property 


3 


CITATIONS ISSUED: 




Robbery- 


2 






Sex Offenses 


U 


Warnings 


877 


Juvenile 


17 


Complaints 


87 


\J L. lie? 1. 


^ V/ ^ 


Mf^Ti — Ot"! nri ti ^ "1 


T Q 

O J -7 






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r X X dx 111 








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oy roxce 




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o n / A 

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XX 


Zi t" t~ omr^t" oH P JCP 
r\\^ Ucuip L-CU O ocXL 


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7 / Q 


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X / 






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ft U / 4 ft 


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TOTZiT Pr.P • 
XUlruj £3 6c XL . 


1 n 7 
X u / 


45/49 


9 






50/54 


7 


ROBBERY: 




55/59 


2 






6 Sc OVER 


1 


Firearm 


2 


TnTZiT O'^T'TTP 1 fl • 
\.\Jxr\lj \jy dt\ XO • 


X ^ o 


Ot" V» O T" Wo a T~iOTl 

v^UXiCX rvcd^^li 









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X D / 










XUiiiXj KUODCiKXEiO : 




bEA L.RiME.& : 




T 7\T3/^'U*'MT'C*C . 

LiAKLbNXbo : 




Rape 


2 


Pocket PxcKxng 




Indecent Exposuire 


Q 
O 


Fursc onaucnxng 


o 


Indecent A&B 


2 


Shoplifting 


17 


Other 





From Motor Vehicles 


45 






M/V Parts & Accessories 


19 


TOTAL SEX CRIMES: 


12 


Bikes 


24 






From Buildings 


82 






From Coin Machines 


1 






Other 


94 



TOTAL LARCENIES: 290 



-28- 



INCIDENTS REPORTED: 



Alarms Responded to 1,656 

Disturbances 1,941 

Domestic Problems 221 

Emergencies Responded to 64 7 

Fires Responded to 13 5 

Juvenile Complaints 304 

Missing Persons Returned 20 

Missing Persons/Still Missing 

Prowlers Reported 176 

Miscellaneous Complaints 9,625 

M/V Accidents 865 

Cruisers Dispatched 9,887 

Suicides & Attempts 4 

Sudden Deaths 10 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Restraining Orders Served 109 

Parking Tickets Issued 180 

Firearm I.D. Issued 70 

License to Carry Issued 209 

Dealer Permits Issued 
Reports to Ins. Co. and 

Attorneys 54 5 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN: 

Autos 4 8 

Trucks & Buses 6 

Other Vehicles 6 

TOTAL : 6 

RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES: 

Stolen Wilmington and 

recovered Wilmington 9 

Stolen Wilmington and 

recovered Out of Town 2 5 

Stolen Out of Town and 

recovered Wilmington 13 

TOTAL : 4 7 

HOMICIDE : 

Physical Force 1 




DARE car — u very familiar site at Wilmington Schools. 



Animal Control Officer 



Dogs Licensed 
Number of Complaints 
Number of Trips 
Number of Trip Hours 
Number of Animals Picked Up 
Number of Animals Returned to Owners 
Number of Animals Adopted 
Number of Animals Released Back to Wild 
Number of Animals Picked Up Dead 
Number of Animals Euthanized 
(7 wildlife, 6 cats, 1 dog) 
Number of Animals Quarantined 
Number of Barn Inspections 
Number of Dog Days at Kennel 
Fines Issued 

Reimbursement from County 
Total Working Hours 



1 , 


202 


1, 


088 




997 




692 




110 




66 




33 




11 




64 




14 




18 




39 




324 


$ 


215 


$ 


360 


1, 


714 



-29- 



Inspector of Buildings 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the Town of Wilmington Zoning 
Bylaw, and for maintaining all related records. In addition, all administrative tasks fo 
the Board of Appeals are handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Daniel Paret; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is William 
Harrison; the Wiring Inspector is Arthur Kelly. Joan Goulet, Toni LaRivee and Wendy 
Martiniello make up the clerical staff, which is shared with the Board of Health. 

In the new year, we will continue to make our office more community friendly. It is our 
goal to help people understand the regulations enforced by the Inspector of Buildings, andl 
how best to comply with them. Toward that end, we will create and revise permitting 
guidelines, provide updates when regulations, requirements, or procedures change, and 
generally strive to maintain a friendly atmosphere 
not hesitate to come and see us. 



If you have any questions, please do 



Dwellings (Single Family) 
Residential Garages 
Additions & Alterations - 
Residential 



No. 

190 
12 

325 



1994 
Valuation 
33 , 860, 000 
367, 900 



No. 

122 
13 



1995 
Valuation 
12 , 201, 100 
190, 500 



No. 
146 

6 



2 , 397 , 145 235 



2 , 426 , 679 226 



1996 
Valuation 
11, 092, 714 
82 , 000 

3, 205, 246 



( 



527 $ 36,625,045 370 $ 14,818,279 378 $ 14,379,960 



Industrial Buildings 


2 


$ 


1, 740, 000 


3 


$ 


7, 500, 000 


3 


$ 


1, 510, 000 


Utility Buildings 










3 




1, 393, 000 


4 




90, 200 


Additions & Alterations - 




















(Non- residential ) 


61 




6, 512,455 


77 




8, 423, 342 


72 




7, 635, 356 


Swimming Pools 


54 




248, 769 


42 




196, 653 


39 




162 , 899 


Signs 


20 




68, 700 


16 




35, 950 


25 




64, 050 


Public Buildings 


























Multi Family Dwellings 


























Sheds and Barns 


40 




48 , 759 


25 




67, 191 


18 




34, 776 


Wood Burning Stoves 


20 




16 , 705 


7 




14 , 698 


11 




11, 621 


197 


$ 


8, 635, 388 


183 


$ 


17, 630, 834 


172 


$ 


9, 508, 902 






$ 


45, 260,433 




$ 


32 , 449, 113 




$ 


23, 888, 862 


Renewals 


1 


$ 


60, 000 


1 


$ 


10, 000 





$ 





Demolitions 


25 




242 , 800 


23 




143, 250 


17 




303, 650 


Fire Damage 


3 




34 , 000 


2 




156, 000 










Foundations 


6 




199, 700 










65 




199, 100 


Temporary Trailers 


3 




10, 000 


2 















38 


$ 


546 , 500 


28 


$ 


309, 250 


82 


$ 


502 , 750 


TOTAL 


762 


$ 


45, 806, 933 


581 


$ 


32, 758, 363 


632 


$ 


24, 391, 612 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND 
TURNED OVER TO TREASURER 



Building Permits 


762 


$137, 493 


00 


581 


$156, 706 


00 


632 


$134, 424 


75 


Wiring Permits 


638 


34, 075 


00 


562 


36, 773 


66 


656 


38, 908 


25 


Gas Permits 


240 


7, 729 


00 


217 


7, 274 


00 


276 


9, 042 


00 


Plumbing Permits 


335 


12 , 584 


00 


304 


12, 491 


00 


338 


12, 240 


00 


Cert, of Inspection 


26 


1, 218 


00 


17 


713 


00 


37 


1, 741 


00 


Copies 




36 


20 




44 


80 




249 


20 


Court 










9 


00 








Industrial Elec. Permits 


25 


3 , 750 


00 


29 


4 , 350 


00 


35 


5, 250 


00 




2, 001 


$193, 135 


20 


1, 710 


$218, 361 


46 


1, 974 


$201, 855 


20 



-30- 



Planning & Conservation Department 



The department continues to provide a high level of service to the community 
in the areas of planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other 
community development activities. The department provides staff support to 
the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and Housing Partnership. The 
Planning Board is responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control 
Act and Site Plan Review, recommendations on zoning amendments and specific 
planning studies. The Conservation Commission is responsible for wetlands 
protection in accordance with the State Wetlands Protection Act. The goal of 
the Housing Partnership is to provide affordable housing for Wilmington 
residents through local initiatives and partnerships with private developers. 
The activities of each board are described in more detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

Goal 1: To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board through review 
of development plans, including coordination with developers and the 
Community Development Technical Review staff. 

Goal 2 : To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 

administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act. 

Goal 3: To provide assistance and information to residents. 

Goal 4: To assist with strategic and comprehensive planning efforts. 

Goal 5: To revise the zoning bylaws and zoning map to enhance the character 
of the Town, while encouraging appropriate economic and residential 
development . 

Goal 6: To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development. 

Goal 7: To develop and implement a stream maintenance program as an on-going 
town program. 

Goal 8: To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

Goal 9: To develop local wetland protection bylaws. 

Goal 10: To promote environmental awareness and education. 

Goal 11: To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership through 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, 
including town-owned land development, monitoring of on-going 
developments and review of local initiative projects sponsored by 
developers . 

Goal 12: To implement community development projects, including development 
and oversight of grant programs. 

Goal 13 : To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various 
state and regional forums. 

The Planning & Conservation Director is Lynn Goonin Duncan. John Keeley 
serves as Conservation Agent and provides technical assistance to the 
Conservation Commission. Secretarial support is provided by Senior Clerks 
Linda Reed and Joann Roberto. 

The Planning & Conservation Director staffs the Housing Partnership, chairs 
the Community Development Technical Review Team, and serves on the Town Center 
Committee and the Committee on Unaccepted Ways. The Director also serves as 
one of the Sexual Harassment Officers, the Fair Housing Coordinator, and the 
representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) , the 



-32- 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning 
Council (NSPC) , acting as the liaison between the town and the state on 
transportation and planning issues. 

Special Projects 

During 1996 the Planning & Conservation Director provided staff support and 
technical assistance to the Master Plan Advisory Committee which was appointed 
by the Planning Board and Board of Selectmen. The purpose of the Committee 
was to review the Eliot Master Plan and other town planning efforts to 
determine which recommendations of the Eliot Master Plan have not been 
achieved and are still relevant today, as well as recent issues that should be 
addressed. Upon completion of its work, the Committee recommended that the 
town appropriate funding to hire a consultant to work with the community to 
prepare a comprehensive plan. A comprehensive plan is a written document with 
maps that is a guide to the physical development of the town. It describes 
how, why, where, and when to build, rebuild or preserve the town. The plan is 
a method of translating the community's values into specific actions. It 
would identify existing conditions, community goals, and how to implement 
those goals. It includes all the functions that make a town work - 
transportation, housing, economic development, open space, public facilities 
and recreation - and the interaction among these functions. 

The Committee on Unaccepted Ways has met monthly since the fall of 1995 for 
the purpose of studying unaccepted ways to determine the cost of improving 
said ways in accordance with Planning Board standards and to determine if the 
town should undertake a program of construction for the purpose of accepting 
these unaccepted ways as public ways. The Committee is charged with reporting 
its findings and recommendations to the Annual Town Meeting in 1997. 

Community Development Program 

In 1996 the Town of Wilmington received a $400,000 Community Development Block 
Grant from the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development 
to establish a revolving loan program for Wilmington businesses, and to re- 
establish an employment assistance program. The program is under the 
jurisdiction of the Planning &. Conservation Department. 

The program offers below-market interest rate loans to manufacturing, retail, 
wholesale and service businesses for machinery and equipment, working capital, 
building improvements, purchase of inventory, fix up and similar projects. To 
qualify for a small business loan, the business must be located in the Town of 
Wilmington and either provide new jobs or retain current jobs for members of 
low and moderate income households. A microenterprise business, containing 
five or fewer employees, is eligible to receive a loan if the owner is a 
member of a low to moderate income household. In this case, no job creation 
is required. 

Baybank, Fleet, Lowell Five Cent Savings, MassBank, Medford Savings and the 
Reading Cooperative Bank are active lending partners in the town's program. 
The town' s loan dollars are able to serve more businesses with bank 
participation. The loan pool totaled in excess of $1,500,000. 

As of the end of 1996, four loans have been issued to The Sewing Bird, Keep it 
Clean, Custom Stitch, and RPM Diesel and Marine. The program goal is to make 
a total of eleven loans to eligible businesses. 

The employment assistance program offers a variety of services at the Job 
Resource Center, including training grants and career assessments for 
unemployed and underemployed Wilmington residents who are members of low and 
moderate income households; individual career counseling for any resident of 
the town in the areas of resumes, cover letters, interviews and training; and 
seminars and workshops which are also open to the Wilmington public. The goal 
is to assist 120 residents, including financial assistance for 20 training 
grants and 5 career assessments. To date, 73 residents have benefitted from 
these employment services, including six who have received training grants. 



-33- 




The program is an exciting and innovative approach to help meet the needs of 
the tovm's residents and small businesses. The program was funded for 
fourteen months and is scheduled for completion in July, 1997. The town does 
intend to apply for additional funding. Program staff who are available to 
assist with information or questions are: Eileen Marsan, Program Director; 
Cathy Beyer, Employment Counselor; and Patricia Sperandio, Secretary. The 
program is located at 10 Church Street, Wilmington. 

PLANNING BOARD 

A major effort of the Planning Board in 1996 was the development of an adult 
use zoning by-law which was approved overwhelmingly by the voters at the 
Special Town Meeting. The purpose of the adult use by-law is to regulate 
adult uses in order to minimize the negative secondary effects. Without such 
a bylaw, an adult bookstore, video store, paraphernalia store, theater or club 
could be located in any commercial district in town. By establishing the 
adult use district, the town is now able to limit where these uses will be 
allowed. The first amendment of the U.S. Constitution protects freedom of 
speech; therefore, the town could not legally prohibit this type of 
expression. The district is located on a portion of the northerly section of 
Ballardvale Street. The location provides sufficient area and access for 
adult uses. However, it is not adjacent to residential neighborhoods, schools 
or churches, the uses most negatively affected by an adult use. Access to the 
district will be from 1-93 and Ballardvale Street; there will be no traffic on 
local roads. The new overlay district will not interfere with the current 
industrial uses in the area. 

The level of permitting activity for definitive subdivisions saw a decrease in 
1996. Seven definitive subdivision plans were submitted, representing a total 
of 45 lots, in comparison with 12 definitive subdivision plans totaling 71 
lots in 1995. However, the level of commercial and industrial activity was 
significant, maintaining the 1995 level which was the greatest in at least 
five years, as indicated by the number of site plan review applications for 
commercial and industrial projects. A major site plan review project reviewed 
and approved by the Planning Board was the reuse of the vacant Wilmington Ford 
site for a new vehicular dealership. 

Subdivisions under construction during the course of the year included 
Stonehedge Estates I and II, Andover Heights, Apache Way, Avon Street 
Extension, Acorn Drive, Colonial Drive, Ashley Estates, Country Oaks, 
Blueberry Hill Estates and Evergreen Estates. 

Streets accepted at the 1996 Annual Town Meeting were Agostino Drive, Allgrove 
Lane, Amherst Road, Crystal Road, Fernbanks Road, Flynn Way and Towpath Drive. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five year 
terms. Planning Board members serving in 1996 were Carole Hamilton, Austin 
Rounds, James Diorio, Michael Roache and Karen Metcalfe. Chairman Richard 
Longo resigned in April after many years of dedicated service and leadership. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed and took action on the 
following subdivision plans: 



Subdivision 



Number 
of Lots 



Action 



Olmstead Avenue 1 

Ashley Estates 5 

Evergreen Estates 7 

Meadow Brook 1 

Mather, Walnut, Poplar, 3 

Polk Streets 

Cherokee Estates II 11 

Marion Estates IV 17 



Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Pending 

Pending 
Pending 



-34- 



Of the forty- three (43) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans that were 
submitted, the Planning Board determined that thirty-eight (38) plans did not 
require approval under the Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed; two (2) 
plans were denied; two (2) were withdrawn; and one (1) is pending. 

Site Plan Review 

The Board reviewed and approved eighteen (18) applications for site plan 
approval for commercial and industrial property. 

Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 4 OA, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings 
included in this Annual Report. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The Conservation Commission had a very busy year again in 1996, reviewing over 
119 wetland permit applications. Total applications again exceeded previous 
records. Public hearings/meetings to review these applications totaled 209. 

The Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act was passed in 1996. This legislation 
instituted a 200 foot "riverfront zone, " which is regulated locally by the 
Conservation Commission. Additionally, Commissioners and staff familiarized 
themselves with state regulatory changes in stormwater management and the 1995 
change in wetland delineation methodology. As always, the primary charge of 
the Conservation Commission is the administration and enforcement of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. Chapter 131, section 40), which 
requires that all activity within the 100 foot buffer zone of wetlands be 
regulated by the local Conservation Commission. 

A stream maintenance program was 
instituted in 1996 and was jointly 
administered by Conservation and the 
Department of Public Works. The 
stream crew removed tons of debris 
which clogged the town's waterways, 
polluting groundwater and causing 
flooding of residential properties. 

Conservation Commissioners are 
appointed by the Town Manager . Terms 
are three years. Commissioners Lynne 
Guzinski (Chairman) , William Gately 
and Gail Mahar left the Commission 
during 1996 after many combined years 
of service. Newly appointed 
Commissioners were: Lisa Brothers, 
Steven Finnerty and Jolene Lewis. 
Continuing to serve on the Commission 
in 1996 were: James Morris 
(Chairman) , Barbara Sullivan, Judith 
Waterhouse and Richard Patterson. 

Any questions about wetlands, laws 
and regulations, and filing 
procedures are welcomed by John Keeley, 

Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected $9,550.00 

Notices of Intent Filed 42 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 77 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held 

(including continuances) 2 09 

Extension Permits Requested/Issued/Denied 9/5/2 




The Stream Maintenance Crew wading through a 
brook to clean up debris. 

Conservation Agent. 



Enforcement Orders Issued 3 

Violation Notices Issued 29 

Certificates of Compliance Requested/Issued 35/28 

Decisions Appealed/Withdravm 3/0 

Order of Conditions Issued/Denied 41/3 

Emergency Certifications Issued 12 

Bylaw Subcommittee Meetings Held 

Request for Insignificant Change /Approved 15/13 

Negative Determinations/Positive/Withdrawn 64/12/2 

Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied 11/8/0 



Notices of Intent 
DEP 



FILE # 


APPLICANT 


LOCATION (MAP/PARCEL) 


DECISION 


344- 


477 


Earl Hupper 


Woburn St. Lot D & 


E - 58/19A 


Approved 


344- 


494 


Chester Hall 


Lot 2 Summer St . - 


84/64A 


Withdrawn 


344- 


495 


Chester Hall 


Lot 3 Summer St. - 


84/89 


Withdrawn 


344- 


515 


Supervalu 


340 Ballardvale St 


reet - R3/44 


Withdrawn 


344- 


521 


Theodora Trust 


West Street - 71/1 


6, 18, 111 & 112 


Pending 


344- 


522 


Paul Butt 


Woburn Street - 86 


/Part of Parcel 2, 


Approved 








2A,4,8B & 8C 




344- 


523 


Woodhill Realty 


Fernbanks Road - 1 


5/109 


Approved 


344- 


524 


Howland Develop. 


337 Ballardvale St 


. - R3/49 


Approved 


344- 


525 


01 in Corp. 


51 Eames Street - 


37/10 


Approved 


344- 


526 


Universe Const . 


Nottingham Dr. Lot 


4 - 18/pt 14 


Approved 


344- 


527 


Universe Const. 


Nottingham Dr. Lot 


5 - 18/pt 14 


Approved 


344- 


528 


Universe Const. 


Nottingham Dr. Lot 


6 - 18/pt 14 


Approved 


344- 


529 


Craig Newhouse 


13 Wabash Road - 8 


/28,28D & 28E 


Denied 


344- 


530 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


2 - 78/47 


Approved 


344- 


531 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


3 - 78/48 


Approved 


344- 


532 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


4 - 78/49 


Approved 


344- 


533 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


5 - 78/50 


Approved 


344- 


534 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


6 - 78/51 


Approved 


344- 


535 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


7 - 78/52 


Approved 


344- 


536 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


8 - 78/53 


Approved 


344- 


537 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


9 - 78/54 


Approved 


344- 


538 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


10 - 78/55 


Approved 


344- 


539 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


11 - 78/56 


Approved 


344- 


540 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


12 - 78/57 


Approved 


344- 


541 


Universe Const. 


Somerset Place Lot 


13 - 78/58 


Denied 


344- 


542 


Ross Spinelli 


6 Kendall Street - 


20/5 


Approved 


344- 


543 


Paul Butt 


Lot 4 Serenoa Lane 


- 86/2C 


Denied 


344- 


544 


Universe Const . 


Somerset Place Lot 


13 - 78/58 


Approved 


344- 


545 


Joseph Langone 


88 Burlington Avenue - 29/ptl5 


Approved 


344- 


546 


Paul Butt 


Lot 4 Serenoa Lane 


- 86/2C 


Approved 


344- 


547 


Paul Butt 


Lot 6 Serenoa Lane 


- 86/2E 


Approved 


344- 


548 


Paul Butt 


Lot 7 Serenoa Lane 


- 86/2F 


Approved 


344- 


549 


Paul Butt 


Lot 8 Serenoa Lane 


- 86/2G 


Approved 


344- 


550 


Joseph Langone 


12 Chestnut Street 


- 29/pt of 15 


Approved 


344- 


551 


James Mangano 


Evergreen Estates 


-87/3A&4 


Approved 


344- 


552 


Joanne Drew 


7 Cunningham St - 


69/122 


Approved 


344- 


553 


Sasso Const. 


231 Andover Street 


- Rl/110 


Approved 


344- 


554 


Olin Corp. 


W. of Main Butters 


Row - 26/2, 27/13, 












25/2 


Approved 


344- 


555 


Universe Const . 


Marion Street - 5/2 


Approved 


344- 


556 


Reading Municipal 












Light Dept . 


42 Industrial Way 


- 46/127 


Approved 


344- 


557 


H.B. Fuller Co. 


820 Woburn Street 


- 47/3 


Approved 


344- 


558 


NOT USED 








344- 


559 


Northeastern Dev. 


84 Burlington Ave. 


- 29/ptl5& 








Corp . 




IIZ 


Approved 


344- 


560 


Genuine Parts Co. 


840 Woburn Street - 


- 46/lA 


Approved 


344- 


561 


Marion Sibley 


19 Dadant Drive - 86/31 


Approved 


344- 


562 


Paul Butt 


Lot 5 Serenoa Ln. 


- 86/2D 


Approved 


344- 


563 


George Pratt 


11 Aldrich Road - 19/11 


Approved 


344- 


564 


81-FF Realty Tr. 


Polk Street Roadway - 6/roadway 


Approved 


344- 


565 


Daniel Brown, Esq. 


165 Chestnut Street - 15/13 & 14 


Pending 



-36- 



Amendments to Orders of Condition Recgiested 



DEP 

FILE # APPLICANT 

344-506 Paul Butt 
344-483 Olin Corp. 
344-489 Marcy Realty 
344-425 Joseph Langone 
344-495 Jera-Lyn 

Builders 
344-524 Rowland Develop- 
ment 

344-262 Norse Environ- 
mental 
344-475 Shawsheen Est. 
344-4 93 Ralph Newhouse 
344-538 Mario Marchese 
344-482 Attorney Daniel 
Brown 



LOCATION (MAP/PARCEL) 

Lot A 324 Woburn Street - 86/14 
8 Jewel Rd. 51 Eames St. - 3 7 
Somerset Estates - 78/1 
Cherokee Estates - 85/78 

4 Park Avenue - 34/17 

337 Ballardvale St - R3/49 

6R Railroad Avenue - 43/22 
Pouliot Place - 106/95,96,97,98 

4 Park Avenue - 34/17 

5 Somerset Place - 78/55 

White Pines Sub. - 68/1 



DECISION 

Approved 
Approved 
Withdrawn 
Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 
Approved 
Approved 
Approved 

Pending 





AddI icabi 1 itv Recruested 














APPLICANT 


LOCATION 


MAP /PARCEL 


ISSUED 


T.Z^M T? ^ c» o a y-r^ Vi 




Rl/30 


M^fT;^ 1~ "i ^rf^ 

1^CHC1.L.X vc 






^ O / Q 


INC^CtUXVc 


R P nil Pn 




41/122 


l^CMCtUX vc 




17 Oh-in c;f-rf=»fat- 


■J c /o 1 7 


INC^Cl.L'X VC 




*X ^ "'J XllW J_^X _L V c 


q-j /n CI 

J J / J. ^ X 


I^CMCIUX vc^ 




X ucwczx x/xxvc 










o n o 1 n 

Z U 3 , Z X u 


iMega u X ve 


jjavia narreuc 


/ OX o ve Ave . 


'iO / X X O 


Negat i ve 


ijemse oweeney 


i*iooxe oL-xeeL. 




jNegau ive 


Joseph Langone 


86 Buirl ington Avs . 


^ y / X D 


Pos i t ive 


Lester Chisholm 


Ao HopKins bcreet 


1 J./ fa Un 


Negat ive 


Craig Newhouse 


o wacasn Koau 


O / O T A 


Negat xve 


rirsc jsapcist 








Church 


i/o (_nurcn bcreec 


fa J / y 


Negat ive 




^ .J MJLLIXJLOII rvv^JdU 


/ 1 a 

J J / X D>i 


INcydUXVC 


Kerry Piro 


2 3 Buckingham St. 


10/8 


Negative 


Edwin W. Larkin 


1 Roosevelt Road 


7/89 


Negative 


LAM Research 


53 Sc 57 Jonspin 








Road 


R1/305&305A 


Negative 


Karen Rosania 


8 Towpath Drive 


28/8 


Negative 


Ajay Goyal 


3701 Pouliot Place 


106/79 


Negative 


Joanna Drew 


70 Cunningham 








Street 


69/122 


Positive 


Colonial Gas 


Woburn St . 








right-of-way 


77/00 


Negative 


Judith Callahan 


40 Marjorie Road 


70/59 


Negative 


Norman Willey 


33 Morningside 








Drive 


69/73J 


Negative 


Keith Houghton 


10 Federal Street 


65/21D 


Negative 


Sylvia Ghafari 


16 New Hampshire 








Road 


35/49 


Negative 


Lauralyn Frizol 


11 Castle Drive 


107/21 


Negative 


Joe Oliver 


69 Chestnut Street 


16/lB 


Negative 


Stephen Tetrault 


3 Fairview Avenue 


41/87A 


Negative 


Michael Bock 


9 Stone Street 


43/19B 


Negative 


Albert Fiorenza 


22 Fiorenza Drive 


R4/54 


Negative 


Marion Sibley 


19 Dadant Drive 


86/31 


Positive 


Brian Page 


4101 Pouliot Place 


106/2A 


Negative 


John Whalen 


34 North Street 


78/26 


Negative 


Zeneca Resins 


730 Main Street 


39/8 Sc 8A 


Negative 


Karen Butler 


11 Gushing Drive 


21/8A 


Negative 



-37- 



Determinations of Applicability Requested - 



(Continued) 









DETERMINATION 


APPLICANT 


LOCATION 


MAP /PARCEL 


ISSUED 


Robert Kelly 


2 Apache Way 


33 /6A 




Brian O'Neal 


6 Apache Way 


19/101 


H ^ ^ X. V w 


John Pacheco 


65 Roosevelt Road 


7/113 


Nscra t i vp 

w 23 ~* A V 


Jeffrey Curtis 


One Stonehedge 






Drive 


107/1 


LM^'^CL A. VC 


Wendell Holmes 


8 River Street 


44/150 




Miara Trans . 


140 West Street 


71/11&13 


Poc: "i h 1 v^a 

i W O Lr X V C 


Dawn Grinovich 


3702 Pouliot Place 


106/80 


Negative 


Karen MacMillan 


4 River Street 


44/149 


Necjat i VP 


Sven J. Wiberg 


42 High Street 


95/11 


NPCIri t" T VP 

^ L« ^ V 


Albert Fiorenza 


17 Fiorenza Drive 


R4/102 


NpcTr^ t" i VP 

A « OA ^ ^ V 


Albert Fiorenza 


19 Fiorenza Drive 


R4/85 


Wi t hdawn 


Albert Fiorenza 


24 Fiorenza Drive 


R4/55 


'T X L> 1 i-V^CX Wl 1 


John Stancato 


123 Glen Road 


54/8D 


Npct.^ t" "i VP 


John Tracey 


55 Houghton Road 


20/25 


Mpct^ t" "i VP 


Zeneca Resins 


730 Main Street 


39/8 




Jeffrey Miller 


165 Chestnut St. 


15 /13 &14 


Po "i t" "i VP 

C W O X L< -Jb V C 


John Pilcher 


47 Butters Row 


28/5B 


Mpct^^ t" 1 VP 


Christy Rhind 


86 Burlington Ave. 


29/15A 


Npq3 t i VP 


Lockheed Martin 


50 Fordham Road 


91/131&99/1 


Npcr^5 1" "i VP 


Thomas Marden 


2 7 McDonald Road 


84/67 


Pos it i ve 


Mario Marchese 


5 Somerset Place 


78/55 


Pos i t i ve 


Colonial Gas 


Middlesex Avenue 


Public Way 


Negat ive 


Frank Marabito 


9 Fernbanks Road 


15/104 


Negat i ve 


81-FF Realty Tr. 


5 Polk Street 


6/43 


Positive 


William Kent 


Hopkins & Shawsheen 








St . 


22/15 


Positive 


Scott Robichaud 


6 Houghton Road 


33/31 


Negat ive 


Richard Lee 


6 Railroad Avenue 


43/122 


Negat ive 


Rene Madore 


4 9 Burnap Street 


34/122 


Negat ive 


Colonial Gas 


High Street 


Public Way 


Negat ive 


Craig Newhouse 


Cochrane Road 


Right -of -way 


Negat ive 


Tennessee Gas 


687 Main Street 


39/10 


Negat ive 


Gregg Roberts 


106 Main Street 


45/141 


Negat ive 


Richard Mede 


72 Butters Row 


27/17 


Pos i t ive 


Joseph McMenimen 


14 Grace Drive 


36/146 


Negat ive 


Michael McCoy 


110 Lowell Street 


49/57D 


Negative 


JohnSons Realty 


382 Middlesex 








Avenue 


89/13B 


Negative 


Hazel O'Brien 


Baker Street 


45/4A-4E 


Positive 


Alfred R. Cunsolo 


18 Freeport Drive 


100/626 


Negative 


Alan Alt man 


400 Main Street 


42/15 


Pending 


Avalon Properties 


Ballardvale Street 


98/4 


Positive 


J . & S . Mahoney 


13 Gloria Way 


67/88G 


Negative 


PGA Realty Tr. 


265 Ballardvale 








Street 


R2/26C 


Negative 



Housing Partnership 



The creation of affordable housing for Wilmington residents continued to be a 
challenging process as experienced by the Housing Partnership during 1996, but 
with several significant successes. A second affordable home built on town- 
owned land was occupied in 1996 through a partnership with a local developer. 
The buyer was a Wilmington resident who was able to purchase his first home 
through this town- initiated program. Also, through the same program, plans 
were redesigned for two single family homes on Denault Drive, one of which 
will be affordable. Construction is anticipated in 1997. The affordable 
dwelling will be a colonial with farmer' s porch, a new housing style for this 
program. Saddle Oak Estates, an affordable housing development, consisting of 
35 single-family homes off West Street, was approved by the Board of Appeals. 
The Partnership had been actively involved in the review process since early 
1995. 



-38- 



The Partnership expended a significant amount of time this past year 
addressing issues at two on-going affordable housing developments. At 
Buckingham Estates, five of the six proposed affordable homes have been sold 
and are occupied. At Shawsheen Commons 48 of the 66 affordable units are 
occupied and a final lottery is planned for March 6, 1997 for the remaining 
eighteen affordable units. 

The Housing Partnership was identified by the State as one of the best housing 
partnerships state-wide. The Director of Planning & Conservation, Lynn 
Duncan, who staffs the Housing Partnership was invited to serve on a panel for 
a state-sponsored workshop on affordable housing with State officials. Also 
on the panel was a local developer, Linn Anderson, who is the developer 
working with the Partnership on the town- initiated developments. 

Active Housing Partnership members throughout 1996 were Chairman Mark Haldane, 
Vice-chairman Raymond Forest, Charles Boyle, Gregory Erickson, Carole 
Hamilton, Alfred Meegan, Jr., Rev. Herbert Taylor, Daniel Wandell and Lester 
White. Daniel Paret, Inspector of Buildings, was appointed to the board in 
1996. The Partnership meets the second Thursday of each month and welcomes 
interested residents to attend. 




Space for children to play at Buckingham Estates. 




Second affordable home constructed on Town-owned land through a public-private partnership between the 
Wilmington Housing Partnership and LA. Associates, Inc. of Wilmington. 



-39- 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Adams Street from 

Adelaide Street from 

Agostino Drive from 

Agostino Drive from 

Aldrich Road from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allenhurst Way from 

Allen Park Drive from 

Amherst Road from 

Andover Street from 

Andover Street from 

Andrew Street from 

Anthony Avenue from 

Apollo Drive from 

Appletree Lane from 

Arlene Avenue from 

Auburn Avenue from 

Ayotte Street from 

Baker Street from 

Baland Road from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Bancroft Street from 

Barbara Avenue from 

Beacon Street from 

Beech Street from 

Beaching Avenue from 

Belmont Avenue from 

Benson Road from 

Biggar Avenue from 

Birchwood Road from 

Birchwood Road from 

Blanchard Road from 

Boutwell Street from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brattle Street from 

Brentwood Avenue from 

Bridge Lane from 

Bridge Lane from 

Broad Street from 

Burlington Avenue from 

Burnap Street from 

Burnap Street from 

Burt Road from 

Butters Row from 

Buzzell Drive from 

Canal Street from 

Carolyn Road from 

Carson Avenue from 

Carter Lane from 

Catherine Avenue from 

Cedar Street from 

Cedar Crest Road from 

Central Street from 

Chandler Road from 

Chapman Avenue from 

Charlotte Road from 

Chase Road from 

Chestnut Street from 

Church Street from 

Clark Street from 

Clorinda Road from 



Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 2,915 

Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 666 

Gandalf Way 999 

Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 580 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 6,740 

Woburn Street 470 

Allgrove Lane to a dead end 430 

Woburn Street 1,161 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 2,319 
Shawsheen Avenue to end of cul-de-sac 1,500 

Salem Street 180 
Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 11,300 

Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 43 5 

Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 300 

Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 300 

Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 994 

Salem Street to Ella Avenue 3,754 

Shawsheen Avenue 755 

Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 24 



12 



Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 
Ballardvale Street 
Salem Street to Route 125 
Route 12 5 to Andover Line 
Liberty Street 

Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 
Church Street to Belmont Avenue 
Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 
Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 
Columbia Street to State Street 
Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 
Salem Street to Ring Avenue 
Shady Lane Drive 
Judith Road 
Kendall Road 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 

Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 
Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 
King Street 

Main Street to Burlington Line 
Grove Avenue 
Winchell Road 

Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 
Main Street to Chestnut Street 
Draper Drive to Evans Drive 



684 
540 
965 
000 
400 
850 
970 
1, 005 
440 
980 
616 
1, 282 
1, 197 
400 
625 
4, 144 
510 
950 
1, 066 
1, 017 
455 
754 
1, 377 
8, 588 
1, 145 
484 
1,653 
3 , 577 
600 



Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 
North Street to Marcia Road 
Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Norfolk Ave. 
Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Burt Road to Harris Street 
Pinewood Road to Judith Road 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Adams Street to Kelley Road 
Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 
Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 
Hathaway Road 

Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 11, 
Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 4, 
Main Street to Church Street 2, 
Agostino Drive 



1 , 



505 
268 
017 
411 
000 
687 
100 
552 
400 
575 
859 
297 
480 
285 
470 
887 



1908 
1976 
1979 
1996 
1894 
1993 
1996 
1994 
1971 
1996 
1894 
1894 
1985 
1966 
1971 
1990 
1966 
1945 
1947 

1945 
1972 
1894 
1894 
1952 
1966 
1915 
1947 
1959 
1933 
1971 
1975 
1952 
1953 
1989 
1894 
1933 
1933 
1945 
1938 
1894 
1894 
1954 
1894 
1953 
1945 
1945 
1894 
1971 

1939 
1960 
1961 
1957 
1966 
1945 
1963 
1950 
1957 
1951 
1971 
1953 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1979 



1984 



1970 



1978 



1985 



1960 
1943 
1943 



19 



1946 



1955 
1971 



1971 



1969 



-40- 









LENGTH 


DATE 


(S) ACCEPTED 




X rotn 


roxest. oureec l.o naDasn KoaQ 


800 


1947 






X X will 


v--iiuxv-.li o c , L.O jjcyono, oexmonc Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


1933 




f r om 


rcuLcxdx OL.XCCL. L.tJ iNLPx L.11 xvcduxn^ Jjine 


b , oO J 


1894 






f rom 


X'WI.COU OUXCCL. L.KJ DU.X X Xll^ UCJIl X1XII6 


y / / 


1 y J 9 






X X ^i^lll 


i*idxii ol^xccL. 




1946 






■F T"orn 

X X will 


XTduiidWdy iN.L'dU 


n f\ 


1951 




\^\J 1. y n V CI 1 LLC 


X X V^Ul 


v^diidX oL.XcrcrU U.vJ ^x dilU Cx 66 U 


c c 
Job 


1951 




r'i^vn^n 1 Pi ^r't^* 

VvWl. lie XX It X d ^ w 


from 




'~i An 

1 'k 1 


T Q O T 

X y oz 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




^X(Joo OL.XCCL. 


X X will 


i*idxxi OL.XCCU Xicjwcxx ouxeeu 


by/ 


1 8 94 




L.xySUa.X KOa.Cl 


f rom 


wojjux n 1, X eec uo ena ox cux - ue - sac 


8 95 


1996 






f rom 






1 Q /I 

X y 4 4 


xyb^ xybj 


V_U.oXi.Xli^ x/xxvc 


"F T~^Tn 

X X KJill 


OlidWoilCdi r\V dlLlC 


Q Q A 

y yu 


1 Q Q "3 

xy y J 




cypress oureeu 


from 


oXen KOdQ 


260 


1951 




JJaQdnU JJxX Vc 


- 

X rom 


iNOxun otreeL. uo woxun ocreet. 


1 , / b U 


1 y b 4 




L/d.VXo IvOdU 


f rom 


iMdXIl OL.XCCL. 


c n n 
D U U 


X y Dz 






f rom 


xldL-lidWdy Kv^dLl 


X / U 


X y D X 




UQ±± JJxxVe 


f rom 


dux X iny uon Avenue 


X , / y 4 


T c o 

xy bo 


1971 




f rom 


Ma in Cf"VQ£i^ 
l*ld Xll oUXtJtiL. 


Q rt 
^ o U 


T Q -7 Q 

X y / y 






f rom 


vjx cii ivvjdva Lo iJc y uiici v^dx A V enue 


1 /I n o 
X , 4 U z 


1 Q C /I 

X y b4 




Dorchester Street 


from 


Bill erica Line 


1, 214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1, 490 


1960 




JJOU.^ X do i-i V crlXLLc: 


f rom 


irdXIllcX Wdy 


X , U X / 


1 Q Q Q 

X y o y 




urdper jjx x ve 


f rom 


Vjiiiiuc X ^0x1 KOdu. CO cj vans ux x ve 


1 c c n 
X , o o U 


1 Q C Q 

X y D y 


X y / X 


urury Jbane 


from 


oxen KOdQ CO ocnoox ocreec 


"3 'i 
D ^ J 


1 Q £r T 

X y o J 




Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


c n n 
I) U U 


X y o X 




jjunuon KOdQ 


f rom 


INdoodU, A V 6X11-1.6 


^ A Q 
D ft 


1 Q C 

X y D D 




iLdlllco oL.XtrcL. 


X rom 


ludXXl OCX66U L.\J WCX'U.XiX OL.X66L. 


7 9 n n 


1 ft Qd 

X O -7 *i 




ILdXXCo £\.CJW 


f rom 


1301 1 1" 


ft 9 n 
o ^ u 


1 Q Q A 

X y y 'I 




Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


450 


1947 




Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1, 043 


1978 




Elwood Road 


from 


rOxesc 0CX66C 


^ A 
O rt Z 


1 Q ^ ft 

X y D o 




Ctv* V <r< M O fr* "v* f~ 


from 


r dUXK.XX6x AV6I1U6 CO VJdJ^WOOQ KOdU 


^ Q n 

D 2? U 


1 Q c; 1 

X y D X 




XLii^ XcrWWt^v^ X'XXVc 


i- L. cm 


IN.dlWv^^\X XfX X V C 


4 R R 

*X ^ 


1 Q71 

X ^ / X 




civans Uxxve 


from 


0UIXQ6X oOIl KOdU CO X^x d^6x X^X X V6 


Z / U / X 


1 Q 7 1 
X y / X 




Everett Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 


id o n 

fi O U 


1 Q "7 Q 

X y / y 




rdXxXXcXQ KOdQ 


£ rom 


l*ld XII C X 6 6 C 


X / Z J7 J7 


X y *± D 




rdXxinedQOw KOdQ 


f rom 


iN X CnOX oCx66C CO XNX CXIOX i3 C X 66 C 


9 9 ft 


1 Q c;ft 

X J7 O O 




Fai rmont Avenue 


f rom 


rlOXXOy KOaQ 


Q 9 


1 Q 7 1 

X y / X 




Fair view Avenue 


from 


ocac6 oCxeec 


O O 






raneuxx jjxxve 


from 


i^ldooddlU.06 CCo AV6X1L16 












CO U6yOXlQ ridXVdXQ i-lV611Ll6 




1 Q R 

X ^ w 




FauiKner Avenue 


from 


ijxen KoaQ co uacoDs ocreec 




X -7 *± *i 


J- -? J -5 


ray bcreec 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


1 XH 


T Q "5 ft 

X y ^ o 


X -7 *i D 


reaerax facreec 


f rom 


MXQQxesex Avenue co woDurn ocxeec 


7 A n 


1 ft Q A 
X O ^ *i 




Ferguson Road. 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 




X y D / 




Fernbanks Road 


from 


Mill Koaa L.O ena or cux-ae-sac 


n 

3 D u 


1 Q Q 

X y y D 




rxayscarr Koaa 


from 


Nichols Street 


Rft 7 


1 Qft Q 

X _7 O 1/ 




Fletcher Lane 


from 


KixmarnocK bcreeu co rioryan Koa.a. 


7 Q 9 


1 Q 7 7 




Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


^^9 7 


1 Q7n 

X -7 / W 




Flynn Way 


from 


Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 


680 


1996 




Fordham Road 


from 


North Reading Line 


3 , 714 


1971 




rorest btreet 


from 


liurxingcon Avenue co Axuricn Koau 


4 inn 


1 H 

J. o ^ ^ 


1976 


Fox Run Drive 


from 


nign bcreec 


97 5 


198 9 




Franklin Avenue 


from 


Arxene Avenue co Arxene Avenue 


7 Q 


1 <57R 

-L ^ / O 




Frederick Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


X , u / u 


± J7 o o 




Freeport Drive 


from 


FarK bcreec co jjucaya v_ircxe 


^ / <-/ O u 


1979 






i- X. will 


m fan Rnad t"n Acro"5tino Drive 


549 


1979 




Gatehouse Lane 


from 


Towpath Road 


380 


1994 




Gearty Street 


from 


Ring Avenue 


627 


1989 




Glen Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6, 870 


1894 




Glendale Circle 


from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1, 304 


1952 




Glenview Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 




Gloria Way 


from 


Broad Street 


770 


1989 





-41- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE ( S ) ACCEPTED 


Gowing Road 


from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 






Grace Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 


2, 514 


1966 






Grand Avenue 


f rom 


v^orey /wenue 


O 1 D 


1 ^ b Z 






Grant Street 


from 


Federal Street 


780 


iy43 






Great Neck Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


536 


T Q O (*i 

1 y o y 






Grove Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4, 147 


1910 






Grove Street 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1957 






Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1, 506 


lyby 


1966 




Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


T Q O 

1 y O Z 






Hanover Street 


from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1 Q O O 

1 y o o 






Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


lyb y 






Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


T Q R 1 

-L y D X 






Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1 Q Q 

J. o y D 






Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1, 312 


± y / 1 






Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


X y 4 D 






Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1 Q C T 

X y o X 






Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1 Q C T 

X y 3 X 


1 Q C "3 

xy b J 


1 Q C Q 

X y b y 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1 Q c £r 
X y o b 






Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1, 286 


1979 






Henry L. Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


651 


1993 






riiyn bureec 


f rom 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


"3 C O C 

J , J o o 


1894 






Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 






riixiuop Koaa 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


'i C A 

o o 4 


1 Q C Q 

X y b y 






Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1, 560 


1 Q /I C 

X y fi D 


X y b X 


T Q C O 

X y b.i 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3, 051 


xo yi 


X y / z 


X y / b 


Houghton Road 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1, 702 


T Q O C 

X y b 






Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4 , 430 


1974 






Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


T Q T O 

X y J o 


194 9 


X y b X 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1, 248 


196 8 






Jewel Drive 


from 


Eames Street 


1, 303 


1 Q O C 

X y o b 






Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


X y 4 u 






Jonspin Road 


from 


Andover Street 


3 , 800 


1 Q Q "3 

X y y o 






Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1 Q c: "3 

X y D J 






Ka j in Way 


from 


Woburn Street 


455 


1 Q O Q 

X y D y 






Kelley Road 


from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 






Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1, 420 


1945 






Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


T T O C 
1 , /ZD 


1 Q T n 
X y / u 


X y / X 




Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1 Q Q 

X y D o 






Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1, 840 


1 O Q ^ 

X o y 4 






King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2, 400 


1 o /I n 
X y 4 u 


X yi b 




King Street Ext. 


from 


Glen Road 


487 


T Q T Q 

X y / y 






Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


X y b X 






Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3 , 855 


X o y 4 






Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


X y b^ 






Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


X y b (J 






Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1 y b 6 






Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4, 013 


1956 






Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


toco 

X y b y 






Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 714 


X y /4 






Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


X y 4 J 






Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


X y 4 i 






Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1, 760 


X y b 






Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 050 


1951 






Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 






Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 






Lorin Drive 


from 


Swain Road 


560 


19 92 






Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1 Q 1 
X y D J 






Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10, 152 


1894 


1978 




Lowell St. Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 


1958 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2 , 469 


1979 






Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 






Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 






Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 







-42- 







T. no ATT DM 


J_iCjINO 1 Jtl 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Main Stireet 


from 


Tewksburv Line to Woburn Line 


91 fi 7 
^ X / JO / 


1894 




M^^yciri Road 


from 


North Street to bevond Carolvn Road 


9 ft nfi 


1962 


1971 


i id 1- VvUO xxwCl.^ 


from 


f^owi ncr Ro^^H 


^ / X o 


1958 




I ICL^ ^^J. ^ V C 


from 


WoVii 1 T~n t" t" o hp von H (^i inHpT"c;on Poa H 


1 c: 9 
X / 3 z ^ 


1961 


1966 


M;^ "T 1 on St'Tf^'f^^t" 


from 


Burl inert" on Avpniip to hpvonH 

^•f M X ^ ^ X x^ v« ^^xx V \^ X X ^ x_/^ v ^^/x xVaX 












Clifton Street 


1 876 


1945 




Mafion Street 


f rom 


Marion St wps ter 1 v to Marion ^ t Tppt" 

1 Xu X. ^ WX X ^ k« ■ W ^ ^ ^ X X y ^ \J 1 Xd X X \JL X O X C ^ ^ 


^ / J 


1995 




Y~~i OT"i p T?o^H 


f rom 


M^ 1 n ^t"T"PPt" 
1 Xd XXX L» X C C L« 


1 7 Q9 

X , O J7 Z 


1951 




Mra c c a pVll 1 t" t" ^ A VP 

11 CI. 1^ ^ d X X l_X ^ ^ ^ 1^ V ^ 


from 


Main Street to bpvond Bts t tip ^tTPPl" 


ft 1 n 


1945 




Mr'Tlon^^lH Po;^d 

11^ wl Id X \^ X\. Wd V>A 


f rom 


Salem Strppt 


9 fi9 1 


1944 




Mp^dow T.anp 


from 


Suncres t Avenue 


364 


1957 




MpI oHv Tianp 


from 


Sh^iw^hppn Avpmip to r?r";^r'P r)r"i vp 

XXCA rV X X^ ^X X V \^ X X \^ \^ \J X d W ^ Xf XXV 


^ 1 ^ 


1966 




Mi HHl p^px Avpniip 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12 14 


1894 






from 


M/5 in StT'ppt to HoViQon A vpm ip 

i id XXX X C ^ la. ta. w X XW J»/ O WX X V C X X 


J O w 


X ^ *x ^ 




Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 












Wpdcrpwood Avpniip 

*i \^ VaXV"j ^ «v v_/ ViiiX rx V ^^x X u 


1 , 528 


1967 




MoT"cr;^n Ro^id 

1 X dX 1 X\. W d U 


from 


Ki 1 mr3 Tnook" StTPPt 


653 


1977 




Mo yn TTinQTHp nT"i vp 


f rom 


T iPV "i ncr t" on ^t"TPPt" t~o P^tt'^tpIH Po^H 

XIC^XXX^^WXX hJL'XCC^ L-W xdXXXXCX xxWd^^ 


O ^ J 


1974 




MoT"C3tfa AvpniiP 


from 


WohiiTn Styppt to bpvonr^ Tij^wn *^1"r"ppt" 


1 360 


1939 




MvQt" 1 c AvpniiP 


f rom 


M"i HHl pcitfav" Avpmip 


X 1 ^ J7 O 


1908 


1988 


"Waecaii AvPmiP 
IN d o o d Li £^ V d 1 d c 


f rom 


^h^wQhppn Avpm 1 p t" o Finn Y on P o;^ H 

O XXd W OXXC CXX /"LVdXLX^ \^\J J_/LXXXL«W11 X\^dV^ 


1 56 6 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1, 057 


1971 




Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 801 


1894 




KT 1 V' o v~ G Zi^r^nii^ 


X X \Jil\ 


WPGt" Qi-r"PPt* 


Q 

17 3 J 


1947 




IN 1^ i. i_ ikJ X j\. n V d i Ll c 


F T"(^m 

X X 


r^aT~t'^T~ T.an^ \' r\ KTa g g a 1 1 Zi Tron 1 1 

VvdX C X J_JdXXC \^\J XNdOOdLX ^~lvcxxlxc 


R 7 


1954 




North Street 


f rom 


Middl esex Avenue to Marc ia Road 


3,515 


1945 




No Wa cilri ncr t on Avp 

x*! > ricAh?xx^xx^ \^\i^xx \^ 


from 


Acro^t ino Dtivp 


858 


1979 




Ni m n P o ^ H 


f rom 


TCpI 1 Pv RoaH 
x\cxxcy xw^dVaX 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




0;5k'H;5lp RoaH 

wd/VVnAd X C xVtWdV^ 


from 


^hort StTPPt to .TiiHith Road 

XXW XLv k^^XC^Lv L« \J \J \JL.\Ji X k« X X x\i Vu/d ^ 


2,301 


1950 




0^5k"T*"i Hnp t"o1 p 

WdlV X X ^ V. X X ^ X C 


f rom 


r^owi nn RoaH t"o fiowi ncr PoaH 

wwWXXX^ XN.WdV.X VjWWXXX^ x\.<^dVaX 


1,730 


1958 




0;^VwooH Po^^H 


f rom 


"i n ^t"T"PPt' t~ o bpvonH T^mpycjon Qt"T'PPt" 


O "J v 


1946 




Ol cjon ^tTPPt* 


from 


Phiirrh strppt 

NvX X LXX^XX OL^XC W L« 


122 


1957 




OvV^ow Dyi vp 

W^i—* W W X/ X X V ^ 


from 


Wobi 1 T'n ^ 1" r*ppt" 


1 751 


1994 




xrdxiii^x iHidy 


f rom 


M"i HHT pc^tf^v AvpmiP 


1 4 3 7 


1989 




IrClXJS. oL.xc:.czL. 


f rom 


rVUxJu.XII OL'XcrcL' Lw INO . iN.t:::clLxXxi^ XtXxxc 


^ , J. o U 


1895 




Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blacks tone Street 


2,000 


1919 




Pat" Vi o G Pr^Ti H T .a n ^ 


f rom 


(^ViOGt~mit~ Cf-T-oot" Y r\ a /^^aH 

VviXC ola-XllXC OCXCCU l—^ d luXOdU. CXX<uL 


X , X o 


1990 




Pat'y'i 1 a r^*i v/^l o 
xTduxx^^xd VwXXV^xc 


F T*rMn 

X X wlU 


npl 1 Flvi TT'P 

ia^CXX Xa/XXVC 


R 9 '^ 

^ ^ 


1958 




PoT*cViinrT Q'hvoo't" 

IrCX oilXi 1^ O L. X C C L. 


f rom 


rcdCXdX ouxc^tru 


79 


1943 




Phi 1 1 1 "Dci Avpmip 

X 1 X X X X ^/ O /A V d 1 


f rom 


Wild Avpnnp to bpvond Rv^Icpt" ?!tr"ppt 

V* X X r\ V CX X V>X^ w \J *J^^ V Va/XXVaX XJd/V w X W X ^ ^ L« 


1,519 


1946 


1954 1981 


P "i 1 oViPT* F)vi VP 

xrXX ^XIC^X l^X X V C 


f rom 


f-Vip pnH O'F r^PAT't"v ^t"ypp1" 

l.^XXC ^XXU WX d XL.y Ol,rXCCU> 


410 


1989 




Pt 1 1 iTi(T Pi^aH 

XT X X X XiiM x\.V,^dU 


f rom 


T-Ia +~ Vi a wa \t P <^ 
xxd L« Xid wd y x\.<u>du 


^ ^ ^ 


1959 




XT XiXC r\v dlLlC 


F Vi^m 

X X will 


Ma"i"n Ct~T'o^t~ i~r^ c on ZlTrtini i o 

I'ld XiX OUXCCL. L.W nWX/O Sa^Xi V dX LtC 


ft n 

.J O w 


1945 




PinpT'iHrrP PoaH 


F T"om 

X X will 


Nror'1"Vi c;t-r*ppt~ 1~o T.Tnr^;=» Poj:5ri 

X>1WX l^XX OL>XC^\^l.r I— ^ J_lXXXUd xWa^dU 


914 


1960 




Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 




Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1, 364 


X J7 J ** 




Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 




Powder House 












J. X X c 


L rom 


I^IX UUX C o C i-i V c^xlLlC 


71 n 

/XL/ 


1954 




r^x c o xUCIlL. X dX JJx . 


f rom 


1 1.7^ "1 1 Ci~>"oot~ 
OtJLlUWCXX OLxCcL. 


B "? 
o ^ o 


1977 




D ^ /~'\ /~r Q TaT "a t y 

r X X c £3 o ricL.y 


from 


xnQUScrxax way 


n 

o ^ u 


1974 




Ol ia"il Piin 


X rom 


rVi^ULlXll Ol^XcrCL. 


500 


1992 




KdUCXxxZ KOdQ. 


L rom 


Coii^Vi C^vo^^ ^o Poncon Poai^ 
OOUuIl OUxccL. L.^^ OCxXoWli I\.<^dU. 


^ ^ 
o ^ ^ 


1971 




Pai T >^i^a/^ 
x\.clXXx\JdU /-iVcXlLlC^ 


f rom 


^XdXiV OUXCCL. 


650 


1909 






f rom 


Oal^T»TOOi^ Poa^ 


^ X ^ 


1979 




Redwood Te r race 


f rom 


Kenwood Avenue 


fid 
O 1 o 


1970 




Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 


1, 090 


1971 




Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


1, 817 


1989 




Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 800 


1973 




Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 




Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1, 150 


1975 




River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


453 


1962 





-43- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE{S) ACCEPTED 



Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1, 861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1, 980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3 , 343 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1, 043 


1951 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond 










Ballardvale Street 


8, 895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from 


North Reading Line to beyond 










Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 


Sarafina's Way 


from 


Hopkins Street 


450 


1995 






southerly through cul-de-sac 






Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Ave . to beyond Drury Lane 


1, 139 


1915 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2 , 904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richmond Street 










to Billerica Line 


11, 845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1, 021 


1951 


^ Vi T*wrinH Ro^H 


f r om 


^wX^OL> k^l^XCCL. L^v^ V. J. 11. d i J. C Z\.\^CL\X 


4 d 
*± *i 3 


1 Q7 1 


silver Lake Ave. 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Sparhawk Drive 


from 


Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 


Sprucewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from 


Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


St rout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1, 246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2 , 290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1, 986 


1938 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 








9 7 
\j ^ J 


1 Q n 7 
J. J \j / 


Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 




f JTom 




^ X ^ 


1 Q Q n 

-L 17 ^ VJ 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracy Circle 


from 


Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


1. i. LilllCtil XxWCa V_l 


i. i- Will 


Ma t~ a Ta?^ \f T? H 

XlCX L. iiCt WCL y XKKJCLyji 


3 00 


1 q ^ 7 
^ ^ ^ J 


Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1, 105 


1954 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1, 650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8, 372 


1894 


West dale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1, 211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1, 050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5, 290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1 , 146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23 , 122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1, 174 


1969 



1963 



1958 



1971 



1929 



1978 



1978 



-44- 



Middlesex Canal Commission 



The Middlesex Canal Association held it's annual spring and fall walks along 
the Woburn and Billerica sections of the canal. These educational walks are 
open to the public and are announced in the local newspapers. 

The Middlesex Canal was built over a ten year period (1793-1803) . The fourth 
of ten scheduled events to commemorate the two hundredth birthday was held in 
the North Woburn Library. Lectures by David Dettinger of Winchester and 
Woburn Historian, Tom Smith illuminated the roles Massachusetts Governor, 
James Sullivan and Colonel Loami Baldwin played in the conception and 
construction of the Middlesex Canal . 

The Middlesex Canal Commission was reactivated under it's new Chairman, Thomas 
Raphael of Winchester. This committee has a state mandate to raise funds and 
to apply for grants through ISTEA (Internodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act of 1991) to preserve and restore sections of the canal for 
public use (e.g. walkways). Grant applications are underway for numerous 
sections of the canal including those in Wilmington. 

Redevelopment Authority 

Early in 1996, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority completed 75% 
engineering plans for the Route 3 8 Roadway Improvement Project and received 
approval from the Massachusetts Highway Department to complete the 100% design 
and construction plans for the project. 

At the close of 1996, the Authority received approval of the 100% construction 
plans for Route 38 from the Massachusetts Highway Department. It is 
anticipated that the roadway improvements and the town's sewer construction 
plans will be advertised for construction bids in March of 1997. 

In addition to current projects the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority has 
provided the Town of Wilmington with continuing benefits from its investment 
in the Jewel Drive Industrial Park for the past 20+ years. At the end of 
1996, there were 10 businesses operating in Jewel Park employing a total of 
1,000 workers. Based upon Fiscal Year 1996 data provided by the Assessor's 
Office, the total assessed value of the Park was $13,813,300 and the annual 
tax revenue to the Town of Wilmington totalled $381,901.49. 

In 1996 Mr. John Ritchie was appointed to fill the vacancy created by the 
death of Authority member, Leo Campbell. The current officers of the 
Authority are as follows: Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman; Charles Gilbert, Vice 
Chairman; Patricia F. Duggan, Treasurer; John Creeth, Secretary and John 
Ritchie, Member. 

Cable T.V. Advisory Task Force 

Task Force members continued the process of cable license renewal during 1996. 
As part of the effort to obtain comments from residents about Continental's 
performance and their desires for improvements or changes in cable service, 
the Task Force conducted a final ascertainment public hearing on February 6th. 
The public hearing was well attended and led to a variety of comments 
including a strong desire for an institutional network for town government and 
the schools, support of local access programs through WCTV and a request for a 
senior discount off the price of cable service. 

Informal negotiations between representatives of the Task Force and 
Continental Cablevision took place during late April and May. As a result of 
the limited progress made during those negotiations, the Task Force decided to 
issue a request for proposal (RFP) to Continental Cablevision. This RFP 
outlined the terms and conditions which the Task Force was seeking for a new 
license and requested detailed information concerning its services and 
financial history. Upon receipt of Continental's response to the RFP in 
October, the Task Force entered into formal negotiations with Continental over 
the terms for a new license. 



-45- 



Cable negotiations have been ongoing through November and December. Issues 
being discussed include the provision of an institutional network, maintenance 
of a location in Wilmington to pay bills and exchange equipment, a discount 
for senior citizens, funding for WCTV, regulation of volume and sound quality 
between programming and commercials and parental control of cable viewing. 

Since the current cable license expires February 27, 1997 the Task Force and 
Continental Cablevision are working to reach a tentative agreement prior to 
the deadline. The Task Force will present a final recommendation to the Board 
of Selectmen who, as the Issuing Authority for the cable license, are vested 
with the responsibility of executing a new license agreement. 

Board of Health 

The Board of Health consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager 
for three year terms . The Office of the Board of Health is located in the 
Town Hall in Room #5 and the Public Health Nurse's office is located off the 
foyer of the Town Hall. Serving on the Board in 1996 were Chairman James 
Ficociello, D.D.S., One Fletcher Lane, Mr. Joseph Paglia, 101 Nichols Street, 
Mr. Milton Calder, Sr., 14 Hobson Avenue. Mr. Paglia's final term ended in 
April of 1996 and Mr. Stephen Peterson was appointed to fill that position. 
The Board of Health extends it's gratitude to Mr. Paglia for his 31 years of 
loyal service to the Town of Wilmington. The Director of Public Health is 
Gregory Erickson, R.S., C.H.O. The Health Inspector is Shelly Williams, 
C.E.H.T., and the Public Health Nurse is Ann FitzGerald, R.N. The Animal 
Inspector is Ellen Davis. The secretarial staff (which is shared with the 
Inspector of Buildings and Board of Appeals) consists of Joan Goulet, Toni 
LaRivee and Wendy Martiniello. 

Field inspections included restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and in the schools, mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks, 
the Fourth of July activities, caterers, the Farm Stand and other temporary 
food stands such as at athletic events. Other duties are percolation tests, 
soil evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal inspections, nuisance complaints, 
hazardous waste spills, leaking underground storage tanks, housing 
inspections, lead paint determinations, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, 
lake water quality sampling and other miscellaneous inspections. 

The administrative duties of the office include the licensing and the 
enforcement of many of the above items, including issuing permits, enforcement 
orders and citations, holding hearings, attending meetings and court actions. 
Other administrative duties include the creation of health or risk prevention 
programs and distributing information on various health issues. 

The Board of Health was awarded a grant of $22,064 by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the continuation of the Tobacco Control 
Program. This program employs a part-time director and clerk, and has as its 
goal the reduction of tobacco use in the Town of Wilmington by 50% by the year 
1999 . 

Our radon detection and survey program continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public as a result of an ongoing two year contract wherein 
residents of the Town of Wilmington have been able to purchase radon detection 
test kits (2 tests per kit) for $17.00 at the office of the Board of Health 
and receive important information for the reduction of radon and the 
associated risk of lung cancer caused by the radiation effects of radon gas. 

A total of 287 animals were vaccinated at the annual rabies clinic for dogs 
and cats during Rabies Awareness Week in May. 

The Public Health Nurse participated in three health fairs. Business Expo 96, 
as well as four Senior Health Day events. Breast Health Awareness Workshop and 
a prostate screening sponsored by Winchester Hospital and the Wilmington Board 
of Health. The nurse participated in "To Your Health, " a video presentation 
on immunization sponsored by WCTV, Winchester Hospital, Wilmington Round Table 
and the Wilmington Board of Health. 



-46- 



The joint pediatric program for Wilmington's uninsured children is still 
available through Wilmington Pediatrics and the Board of Health which provides 
free pediatric immunizations. Influenza and pneumonia clinics were held as 
well. The Medicare-B, Massachusetts Immunization Program will reimburse the 
town for the administering of vaccine to eligible senior citizens. Mantoux 
skin tests for T.B., M.M.R. and T.D. clinics were held at the Wilmington 
public schools. Adolescent Hepatitis B vaccine clinics were held for 11 year 
old students at the middle schools. 

The public health nurse continues to participate in the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health Community Health Network Area (CHNA) #15. The 
group of hospitals, Boards of Health, agencies and providers in the region 
have a common goal of raising public awareness concerning the severity and the 
impact of domestic violence on residents in each of 18 cities and towns 
involved in the network. The nurse has attended programs for professional 
development on low vision, updated immunization and T.B. practices, and 
continues to serve as a member of the Community Roundtable at the Wilmington 
Family Medical Center and for the Resource Center. 

A. Communicable Disease Control : 



1. 


Immunizations administered 
Office-Flu vaccinations administered 
Home-Flu vaccinations administered 
Clinic-Flu vaccinations administered 
Pneumovax administered 
Hepatitis B vaccinations administered 
Fees Collected (Medicare B) 
Flu distributed 


TOO 
1 

252 
44 

94 
81 

556 
$830. 94 

700 


2 . 


Communicable Diseases Reported 
Home Visits 


56 



3 . 


Tuberculosis Cases 
Office Visits 
Home Visits 


3 

132 
2 


Public Health Nursinq: 




1. 


Premature births /Newborn Report 





2 . 


Morbidity-V.N. A. Calls/Office Visits 


9 


3. 


General Health Supervision/Home Visits 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 
Telephone/Health Conference Call 


147 
141 
164 


4 . 


Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 


522 


5. 


Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 
Fees Collected 


24 

$24 . 00 


6 . 


Other Screenings 
Breast Self -Examinations 
Blood Pressure 
Mantoux 



74 
37 


7. 


Senior Counseling/Drop- In Center 

Number of Sessions 

Hypertension Screening 

Diabetic Screening 

General Health (injections) 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screening 

Fees Collected 


41 
657 
35 
14 
59 

$35 . 00 


8. 


Blood Lead Testing 


9 



-47- 



9. Blood Analyzer Testing Clients 45 
Total number of tests 55 
Fees Collected $215.00 

10. Meetings 72 

11. Vaccine Distribution 78 

12. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $1,105.94 
C. Environmental Health: 

1. Transport/Haulers $4,400.00 
Stables 585.00 
Miscellaneous permits 1,860.00 
Percolation testing 9,350.00 
Sewage system permits 21,275.00 
Food establishment permits 8,585.00 
Installers permits 2,600.00 
Sub-Divisions reviews 400.00 
Massage Therapy/Funeral Directors 550.00 
Copies 134.40 
Court witness fees 18.00 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $49,757.40 

2. Meetings Attended 126 

3. Disposal Works Construction Inspections 323 

4. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 129 

5. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 103 

6. Food Establishment Inspections 

Food Service Inspection 65 

Retail Food 24 

Residential Kitchen 1 

Mobile Food 15 

7. Food Establishment Re- Inspections 

Food Service 23 

Retail Food 9 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 

8. Nuisance Complaint Inspections 94 

9. Nuisance Complaint Re- Inspections 55 

10. Housing Inspections 12 

11. Housing Re- Inspections 6 

12. Percolation Tests 248 

13. Court Appearances 13 

14 . Hazardous Waste Investigations 3 

15. Camp Inspections 1 

16. Miscellaneous Inspections 73 

17. Lead Inspections 

18. Tobacco Control Program Inspections 65 

19. Title 5 Inspection Reports Received 292 



-48- 



Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR 
(Code of Federal Regulations) ; Chapter 3 OB of the State Procurement Law, and 
State and Federal Code of Ethics. All state and federal programs are audited 
on an annual basis. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting of four 
elected and one state appointed member, oversees the Authority's policies and 
procedures. The Executive Director is charged with the administration of 
these procedures . 

The Authority, originally consisting of 4 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) families and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 Certificate and Voucher Programs. 

The state leased housing program has been severely curtailed and the Authority 
is seeking other ways in which it can provide housing for both senior citizens 
and families. Currently, all programs are leased at 100%. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough housing 
for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally independently but 
who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington Housing 
Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive home 
care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed and another program currently being 
pursued by the Authority is housing for frail elders, which would provide 
housing, meals, medical care and other services, while allowing seniors to 
maintain private quarters . 

There were numerous vacancies in 1996 for the Senior Housing Development. 
There were six vacancies in the low income properties. The elevator was 
installed for our seniors at Deming Way Extension. In 1997 in conjunction 
with Colonial Gas Company's Small/Medium Commercial and Industrial Partners in 
Energy Efficiency Program, new high efficiency boilers will be installed for 
the seniors at Deming Way. 

The Share Program was instituted in 1993 and since that time has doubled in 
size. A great deal of thanks to Dot Butler, Grace Rosa and Anna Stanley, the 
organizers of this program and to the many seniors and other community 
activists that make this program work. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. Also to Michael Caira, Town Manager, and all the 
town employees who bring a better quality of living to our tenants. 

BOARD MEMBERS EXPIRATION OF TERM 



Dorothy Butler - Chairman April 1998 

Alfred Meegan - Vice Chairman April 1997 

Charles Fiore, Jr - Treasurer April 1998 

Robert DiPasquale - Vice Treasurer/State Appointee March 1998 

Melvin Keough - Secretary April 1999 



-49- 



Town Counsel 



On January 1, 1996, there were pending the following actions by or against the 
town (exclusive of actions in which the town was merely summoned as trustee, 
and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in 
the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board) . 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira, et__al, 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari for 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) 

Ruth E. Marranzini, et al v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

William Baldwin, p. p. a. et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L.c.93) 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa, et al v. William Clifford, Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford, v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L.c.22 9, s.2 and third party 
claim G . L . c . 231B) 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #87-3541 
(action for appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under the 
Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U.S.C.) 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court) 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court) 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning Official Map (c.41, s.81E)) 

Scott C. Reinold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#91-4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging to tortious acts by the 
Wilmington Police Department) 

Priscilla Collins, Administratrix De Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court, #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) 

Joseph P. McMenimen. et al v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts., et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #92-6822 (appeal from further decision of Housing Appeals 
Committee) 

Mildred F. Woods, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Land Court (petition to 
determine zoning relevancy) 



-50- 



Pesidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board . Land 
Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G.L. c. 41, 
S.81BB) 

Ruth Tkachuk, et al v. Wilmington Board of Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #195418 CDJ, ZJA, ZBJ (action for zoning relief) 

Robert P. Magliozzi, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-7141 (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a 
variance) 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas , et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516 
(complaint for judicial review of zoning decision) 

Joanne M. Cuoco, et al v. Gregory Erickson, et al . Woburn District Court 
#945cvl090 (appeal from decision of Board of Health) 

Velma Emery v. Richard A. Luongo. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-5527 
(Appeal from the decision of the Planning Board) 

James J. Piro, et al v. Donald F. Sughrue, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#94-6399 (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

Town of Reading Municipal Light Department v. Town of Wilmington, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #95-0534 (action to compel the town to implement 
electric light liens on town residents) 

George A. Anderson, Jr. v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#95-2288 (action for reinstatement of employee as fire fighter) 

New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals . Land Court #219125 
(action pursuant to G.L. C.40A, s.l7 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) 

New England Landevelopment, Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #219126 
(action pursuant to G.L. C.40A, s.l7 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) 

William E. Leatham, III, et ux v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #95-4539 (complaint in ten counts alleging negligence and other 
matters contained in the complaint) 

Clifford Preble v. Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration Association #11 
390 02450 95 (claim for holiday pay) 

Jarrett Amicone v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#95-5760 (complaint for alleged violation of state and federal civil rights 
and assault and battery and ancillary damages) 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association #11 390 02527 95 (class action grievance and claim for grievance) 

Michael's Place, Inc. v. Board of Selectmen , Hearing at Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Commission (appeal to Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission from 
denial of application of a liquor license) 

Town of Wilmington v. J. Tropeano, Inc., et al , Middlesex Superior Court #95 
53CV0829 (action against general contractor and suit on the bond) 

State Ethics Commission v. Arthur R. Smith. Jr. . State Ethics Commission No. 
522 (hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) 

State Ethics Commission v. James Russo , State Ethics Commission No. 523 
(hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) 

******************************** 



-51- 



During the year 1996, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

lAFF. Local 1370 (McClellan and Bradbury) v. Town of Wilmington . American 
Arbitration Association #113900017796 (grievance concerning payment of fringe 
benefits) 

Lorinda Kacamburas v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court #95-5542 
(claim for personal injury) 

Joseph C. Langone, Trustee of Sacco Realty Trust v. Wilmington Conservation 
Commission , Department of Environmental Protection #96-002 (adjudicatory 
hearing concerning Order of Conditions) 

Albert A. Cuoco, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Land Court #226211 
(petition for Declaratory Judgment or to Remove Cloud on Title) 

James Piro v. Board of Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington . Woburn District 
Court #9653CV0320 (Petition for Review Under G.L. c.140, s.157) 

Therman L. Wilson, et al v. Officers Richter and Bossi . Middlesex Superior 
Court #96-1579 (claim for violation of Title 42, section 1983, et al) 

Esis, Inc. and Amtrack v. Town of Wilmington . Quincy District Court #96CV0804 
(claims for property damage and personal injury) 

Brandon Cave v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5017 (claim 
for personal injury) 

New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #231224 
(action pursuant to G.L. c.41, S.81BB for judicial review of a Planning Board 
decision) 

Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5584 
(action for declaratory judgment and claim pursuant to administrative 
procedure act) 

Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , State Fire Marshall's Office (appeal 
of cease and desist order) 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association (claim of grievance for working out of classification) 

James Joseph Randall, et ux v. Daniel P. Murphy, et al . Land Court #231644 
(claim for declaratory judgment and adjudication of rights concerning 
so-called paper street) 

Kevin F. MacDonald v. Town of Wilmington Planning Board . Middlesex Superior 
Court #96-6416 (complaint for equitable relief concerning surety bond filed 
pursuant to G.L. c.41, s.81U) 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Ethics Commission , 
Middlesex Superior Court #96-6682 (motion by the town to intervene, allowed) 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Civil Service Commission 
(claim for grievance relative to suspension) 

************************** 

During the year 1996, no new actions were brought by or on behalf of the town. 

**************************** 

There are pending as of January 1, 1997, separate petitions for abatements 
before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for several different 
years . 

******************************* 



-52- 



During the year 1996, the following actions by or against the town were 
disposed of : 

James J. Piro. et al v. Donald F. Sughrue, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#94-6399 (disposed of by agreement for judgment of the parties annulling the 
decision of the Board of Appeals) 

Velma Emery v. Richard A. Luongo, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #94-5527 
(disposed of by stipulation of dismissal, with prejudice, by agreement of all 
counsel) 

Robert P. Magliozzi, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-7141 (disposed of by Superior Court deciding that Board of Appeals 
exceeded it's authority in granting the variance) 

lAFF, Local 1370 (McClellan and Bradbury) v. Town of Wilmington , American 
Arbitration Association #113 900017796 (disposed of by compromise agreement) 

Joseph C. Langone, Trustee of Sacco Realty Trust v. Wilmington Conservation 
Commission , Department of Environmental Protection #96-002 (dismissed by 
decision of the Administrative Law Judge ordering finality of superseding 
order of conditions dated December 28, 1995) 

AFSCME Counsel 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association #11 390 02527 95 (disposed of by American Arbitration deciding the 
town did not violate Article 13 of the collective bargaining agreement by its 
implementation of a seniority-based overtime policy) 

George A. Anderson, Jr. v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#95-2288 (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal) 

Michael's Place, Inc. v. Board of Selectmen , Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Commission (case remanded to the Board of Selectmen for further hearings) 

Clifford Preble v. Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration Association #11 
390 02450 95 (alleged grievance denied after hearing before an arbitrator) 



Historical Commission 



In April of 1996, the Wilmington Historical Commission was proud to put on 
sale the publication, "WILMINGTON: A RETROSPECTIVE." This book, funded by 
the Historical Commission, was the culmination of years of research by Gerry 
O'Reilly. As a result of this, the Historical Commission acquired many 
priceless Wilmington photos for the town's historical archives. 

The Historical Commission participated in the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce's 
Expo called, "Getting to Know You" by providing a photographic exhibit of 
early Wilmington. 

The Wilmington Town Pound located on Glen Road has been properly marked "Town 
Pound 1814." This inscription is etched in a large boulder at the front of 
the pound. Wilmington's Pound, once used to keep stray animals until their 
owners could claim them, is only one of three in New England still on its 
original site. 

The Historical Commission sponsored the Colonial Concert folk singer on 
"Liberty Pole Weekend" in June. 

An inventory was compiled of items at the Harnden Tavern showing the origin 
and value of over 500 objects. 




The Colonial 
Joshua Harnden 
Tavern is open 
for free tours 
on the first 
Sunday of the 
month from 2:00 
p.m. to 4 : 00 
p.m. The 
Commission also 
hosted students 
and civic groups 
on private tours 
of the Tavern. 

The Friends of 
the Harnden 
Tavern held 
their annual 
Strawberry 
Festival and 
Christmas Social 



Renovations to the Harnden Tarvem. 



Memberships in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic 
Massachusetts have been renewed. 

The Historical Commission is grateful to the Public Buildings Department for 
their hard work in replacing the chimney and roof on the Old West School . We 
are also thankful to the Public Works Department for rejuvenating the historic 
Town Pound . 

The Historical Commission is thankful to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager 
and Assistant Town Manager for their support. 

The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month in Room 4 of the Town 
Hall. 



-54- 



Carter Lecture Fund 



The Carter Lecture Fund Committee, consisting of five Wilmington residents, 
screen many suggested programs in order to choose one which they feel will be 
most enjoyable and informative to an audience. This fund has been made 
possible because of a bequest left by a prominent citizen, Sarah J. D. Carter 
in 1910. In April of 1996, the selected program proved to be of great 
interest to the large and appreciative audience. 

The lecture by Mr. Gregory Deyermejian, an avid explorer, brought Peru to the 
audience through his enlightening lecture and slides. He has made nine trips 
into the jungle in an effort to find Paititi, believed to be the last refuge 
of the Incas . Mr. Deyermejian is a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society, a 
member of the Explorers Club, and a member of the Andean Explorers Foundation 
and the Peruvian Foundation for the Conservation of Nature. 

In the spring of 1997 the committee will present another lecture. 



Public Buildings Department 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town 
and school buildings. We are responsible for the cleaning and sanitary 
conditions for town employees, school children and personnel and the general 
public . 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
1996 . 

The Harnden Tavern was given a fresh coat of paint. 

The Arts Council (old Town Hall) was also given a fresh coat of paint. 

The Little West School House has a new roof installed on the main section 
of the building. 

New section of roof was installed on the Woburn Street School. 

During the summer all schools were prepared for a successful opening 
in September. 

Voting machines were programmed and set up for all elections. 

High School gym and auditorium were set up for Town Meetings. 

Renovation was done to the West Intermediate School Metal Shop 
for use as a regular classroom. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for 
musical concerts and plays. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Town Departments, School Administration and especially all the employees of 
the Public Buildings Department for their continued help, support and 
cooperation in making 1996 a productive year. 

Permanent Building Committee 

The Permanent Building Committee has been designated to look at the space 
needs of both town and school buildings and recommend what is needed for both. 

The Permanent Building Committee has been meeting for the past 11 months with 
Archetype Architecture, Inc. and various town officials to try and help with a 
recommendation to alleviate some space concerns both on the municipal and 
school sides of government. We have held over 20 meetings and put in 50 hours 
of public meetings. 



-55- 



After consulting with the Police Chief and Fire Chief, it is the 
recommendation of the Permanent Building Committee for Phase I of the Space 
Needs Study to construct a public safety building to house both police and 
fire at the corner of Adelaide and Church Streets. This project was estimated 
by the consultant to cost five million dollars. 

When the public safety building is finished it is recommended to demolish the 
old police station and move the Public Buildings Department, presently located 
at the Whitefield School site, into the old fire station. 

The Permanent Building Committee has had numerous meetings with school 
officials and the consultant. The one option that the school department 
wanted was a new high school. This project needed a 30 acre parcel. The 
committee looked at various sites and eliminated different sites because of 
wetlands and problematic areas of concern. The last site available was the 
Town Forest site at Ballardvale Street. After meeting with the safety officer 
and taking traffic counts on Ballardvale Street, it was voted by the Permanent 
Building Committee to eliminate the Town Forest which ended the high school 
option. 

The School Committee voted to go with a 6-8 grade middle school. They felt it 
was the best educational option to serve the needs of all the middle and 
elementary students. They said they could only support the 6-8 grade middle 
school at this time. 

After numerous discussions with members of the School Committee, the Permanent 
Building Committee is recommending for Phase I of the Space Needs Study that 
the town construct a 150,000 sq. ft. 6-8 grade middle school to be located by 
the West Intermediate School. The consultant estimated this project would 
cost 23.4 million dollars. 

The Permanent Building Committee will be meeting in the future to determine 
the best recommendations for Phases II and III as necessary. 

We gratefully acknowledge the help and support from all town officials, 
Department Heads and the Town Manager in helping us decide which is the best 
way to eliminate the space problems for our Phase I recommendation. 




-56- 



Recreation Department 



The Recreation Department completed its 26th year with a full-time Director. 
Along with a full-time Director is a full-time Senior Clerk. The department 
office is located in room 8 in Town Hall. Office hours are 8:30 to 4:30 p.m., 
Monday thru Friday. 

Assisting the department is the Recreation Commission. This volunteer board 
acts in an advisory and policy making capacity. Members are: William Savosik 
(Chairman) , James Buckley (Secretary) , Charles Burns (Vice Chairman) , Larry 
Noel and Jay Tighe . Commissioners are active in various related capacities in 
and around town. For example: Jay Tighe is Chairman of the Master Plan 
Advisory Committee. Jim Buckley and Mike Burns are members of the ever-active 
Lions Club. Jim was recently honored as Wilmington's "Good Guy" for 1996. 
Larry Noel and Bill Savosik are involved with the Elks and other 
organizations . 

Even though the Recreation Department remains small, with only two full-time 
employees, it represents the second largest industry (leisure) in our country. 
The department offers, on a year round basis, an ever-changing slate of 
activities for all ages of local citizens. 

The department keeps in mind the following guidelines as it plans recreation 
opportunities for the town: 



provide opportunities for self-expression 

offer programs which develop a sense of personal worth 

provide activities that allow for personal achievement and 

accomplishment 

provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a 
certain amount of challenge to participants 

teach skills in various activities that will have carryover value in 
later life 

provide a variety of healthy and diversified programs 
make programs as accessible to all as possible 




A town-wide 
recreation 
survey taken 
three years ago 
also provided 
valuable 
information and 
direction . 
Survey results 
showed that: a) 
family 

satisfaction 
with recreation 
was moderate, b) 
respondents 
placed 

recreation as a 
high priority 
public service, 
c) our 

dependence upon 
user fees with 
tax support is 

the desired way of financing the department, d) most respondents participate 
in a recreation program, e) age groups, in order, needing more recreation are 
junior high age, middle age then pre-school. 

Our departmental funding comes from a variety of sources. The town 
appropriated budget provides for a full-time director and clerk, a summer 
special needs day camp and some supplies. Program fees and donations heavily 



Fishing at Silver Lake. 



supplement the tovm funded budget. We are pleased with our continued ability 
to offer high quality programs at very reasonable costs. We are able to do 
this because we utilize fund raising methods which are services too. These 
services are: various trips and programs. Town Hall Pepsi and snack machine, 
sale of Wilmington sweatshirts and t-shirts, sale of Entertainment Books, sale 
of Ski Books and canoe rental. Shawsheen Tech sometimes helps us with 
printing and related services. Volunteers, as always, play a key role in 
providing two dollars worth of service for every dollar spent. We utilize 
volunteers in varying capacities in many of our programs. They provide a 
valuable service and gain much themselves in this capacity. We also receive 
much help from local businesses and organizations. Some of these invaluable 
contributors are: Lions Club, Kiwanis, Chamber of Commerce, Wilmington Town 
Employees Association, Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks, Knights of Columbus, Police 
Association, Custodial Union, Dunkin Donuts, Analog Devices, Stelio's 
Restaurant, F & R Auto Supply, McDonald's, Burger King, Sweetheart Cup, Dandi- 
Lyons, Auxiliary Police, Pepsi Cola, Tootsie's Kitchen, DeMoulas, Textron, 
MASSBANK for Savings, Shriners, Agfa and Ski Haus . We will continue to search 
for new and innovative ways to generate needed funds to keep costs low for the 
consumer . 

The Recreation Department is involved, in varying degrees, with other 
recreation oriented groups. In this capacity, we serve as a quasi-consulting 
agency. We also loan recreation equipment to families and groups for various 
functions. We program use of the Shawsheen Tech pool for scouts and other 
groups. We also use this pool for our summer swim lessons program. We are a 
diverse information source and referral agency answering a wide variety and a 
large number of questions every day. 

Our basic programs were: Santa's Workshop, Horribles Parade, Elks Christmas 
Party for Special Kids, Basketball League, Adult Gym, Swimming Lessons, CPR, 
Gymnastics, Aerobics, Cinema Discounts, Discounts to Other Commercial 
Recreation Enterprises, Discount Coupons, Disney on Ice at Boston Garden, 
Florida Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg Hunt, Circus Tickets at Fleet Center, 
Bruins Tickets, Summer Playground, Tiny Tots, Special Needs Day Camp, Public 
Beach Lifeguard Supervision, Canoe Rental, Horseback Riding Lessons, Tennis 
Lessons, Concerts on the Common, Fishing Derby, Co-Ed Volleyball, Free Loan of 
Fishing, Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, Aerobics, Hawaii and other VCR tapes. Video 
Camp, Guitar Lessons, Intermediate Ice Skating Party, Police Association Beach 
Day, Easter Coloring Contest, Sale of Entertainment Discount Books, Special 
Needs Trips to the Shriners Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom and Country Western 
Dancing Lessons, Kinder Karate, Junior Basketball, Topsfield Fair Tickets, 
Rafting, Big "E" Tickets, Sale of Ski Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball 

League and 
Clinics, Golf 
Lessons, Letters 
from Santa, Town 
Park Softball 
Leagues, Sale of 
Tickets to Water 
Country, Baby 
Sitting Course, 
Kids Crafts 
Classes, Adult 
Craft Classes, 
Junior and 
Intermediate 
Bowling Leagues 
and Flower Show 
Tickets. Our 
trips continue 
to grow in 
popularity. Day 
trips included: 
Flower Show, St. 
Paticks Day 
Party in NH, 
Olympic Figure 
Skating Show, 

Learning to fish. Old Deerfield, 

-58- 




Boston Duck Tours, N.E. Revolution Soccer, Major League Soccer Championship, 
Reebok Women's Basketball Classic, Newport, Christmas Shopping in New York 
City, Spring trip to New York City, Cranes Beach Sand Castle Day, Red Sox, 
Connecticut Casinos - Ledyard and Mohegan Sun, Martha's Vineyard and Roller 
Skating for Intermediate students. During the summer we took playground, tiny 
tots and special needs camp participants on many field trip excursions. 
Theatre trips included: Boston Pops, Jesus Christ Superstar, Christmas Carol, 
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Goldilocks, Crazy for You, Peter 
Pan and Phantom of the Opera. Overnight trips included: Atlantic City, Las 
Vegas, Bermuda Cruise, Myrtle Beach, Disney World and Vermont Fall Foliage. 

We try to remain versatile and receptive to new ideas and trends. Due to 
change in demand and other factors, we change our offerings to the tune of 10- 
20% each year. We continue to see an increase in the number of participants 
in many of our programs especially youth programs. Our trips for adults and 
families provide much needed revenue. These trips are in great demand. Arts 
and crafts programs for children and adults continue to expand also. 

Some of the other groups that offer leisure type programs in Wilmington are: 
Little League, Elderly Services Department, Youth Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure 
Skating Club, Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, Tennis Club, July 4th Committee, 
Community Schools, Council for the Arts, Scouts, Campfire and the Skating 
Rink. Schools and churches round out the active recreation picture. The 
emergence of the independent Youth Center at St. Thomas is a big plus for 
teens . 

The lack of commercial recreation in Wilmington, such as bowling centers and 
movie theaters and the lack of agencies such as YMCA' s and Boys/Girls Clubs 
stresses the importance of town support for this department, especially now 
with a growing youth population and a growing demand for recreation 
opportunities . 

Veterans Services 

Veterans 
Services is 
governed by the 
General Laws of 
Massachusetts , 
Chapter 115, as 
amended, with 
strict 

compliances to 
this chapter, 
the rules and 
policies govern 
the disbursement 
of aid. 
Benefits are 
available for 
the needy 
veteran and his 
immediate family 
who have been 
subjected to 
unforeseen 
needs . Final 
approval of 
benefits come 
from the 
Commissioner of 
Veterans Services, 



-59- 




Total expended for aid to veterans and their families for the entire year was 
$9,856.00. The balance of the first six months of 1996 from previous 
appropriations was $2,548.00. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1996 
was $10,000. Additional benefits expended by the Veterans Administration 
directly to the veteran population in Wilmington was $1,320,220 for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1996. This represents the amount of tax dollars not 
required to be expended for those who, because of circumstances, find it 
necessary to apply for aid. 



Library 

In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, the Memorial 
Library's Annual Report for 1996, with accompanying statistics, is herewith 
submitted . 

The Memorial Library made progress in 1996 toward meeting the goals and 
objectives of the library's five year Long Range Plan. Headway was made 
toward the goal of "improving access and use of the library's collection and 
services" as seen daily in the increased expectation and use of the library by 
the public. Residents read about library services, programs and news in 
weekly press releases and by way of local cable TV. The staff developed book 
lists and handouts to guide patrons to the library's collection and services. 
Library staff continued to meet quarterly with Wilmington school librarians to 
discuss and develop better ways to meet the needs of students. 

Increased interest and use of the library's Internet connection was also 
evident during the year. Librarians Christina Stewart and Eileen Broderick 
presented the program, "Introduction to the Internet" during National Library 
Week in April and staff assisted patrons daily in getting on the Information 
Superhighway. Laurel Toole, Head of Technical Services, indexed the two 
weekly Wilmington newspapers providing access to information which will become 
Wilmington's history. 

The Children's Department has been especially impacted by the dramatic 
increase in service demands from the preschool through middle school 
population. During 1996, over 3,000 children participated in programs 
presented by the Children's Department. The opening, in October, of the 
Abundant Life Christian School and Learning Center located next door to the 
library also added to the buzz of after school activity when the Children's 
Room is filled to capacity with students doing research. 

The goal of "improving the library's materials collection to better serve the 
interest and needs of the community" is one where we saw progress in important 
areas. A core video collection for children and adults became available in 
January. In late summer, a compact disc collection in the adult department 
began circulating. The staff continued to update the collection by 
identifying outdated material and replacing it with current information. 

The library collection and its services were enhanced by monetary gifts from 
individuals and organizations and by volunteers who donated their time. The 
Books on Tape collection and the descriptive video collection were increased 
by donations from the Wilmington Lion's Club. Individuals contributed to 
Memorial Funds, made matching gift donations through their businesses and 
responded to the fund raiser, "Plug into Literacy" sponsored by Continental 
Cablevision. The popular museum pass program was sponsored by several 
organizations: the Wilmington Community Fund, the Wilmington Elementary 
School PACs, the Wilmington Council of the Arts and the Wilmington Garden 
Club. A special thanks to Pat Dennis for her hard work in coordinating the 
fund raising efforts for this program. We thank the following volunteers who 
gave their time to the library: Greg Anderson, Megan Falzone, Kristin 
Finnerty, Estelle Fugere, Charlotte Hauray, Daniel Oreper, Jeremy Oreper, 
Arlene TenDyke, Kristin TenDyke, Keri TenDyke, Elaine Tohmc, Karen Tohmc, 
Chris Vaillancourt , Karen Whitfield, and Lauren Whitfield. We acknowledge the 
valuable hours of service to the library provided by the two Senior Citizens 
who participated in the Town's Property Tax Work Off Program. As Circulation 
Aides, Estelle Fugere and Janna Corsetti were helpful and enthusiastic in 
assisting staff. 

-60- 



Time and effort were invested toward 
meeting the goal of "developing a 
skilled and knowledgeable staff." 
Librarians responsible for providing 
reference service participated in 
Internet training workshops 
throughout the year . Four members of 
the library staff attended Windows 95 
classes in December at the Shawsheen 
Valley Technical High School. Two 
more library employees will be 
attending these classes in January, 
1997 . 

A primary goal of the library's Long 
Range Plan is to "improve the 
library's physical facilities." The 
Town of Wilmington : Space Needs 
Study prepared by Archetype 
Architecture, Inc. confirmed that the 
present 15,000 square foot building 
is inadequate to meet the needs of 
the present and future Wilmington Town Officials attend retirement celebration for 

population. During 19 96, the library Sally Rueter 

implemented some short-term solutions 

to solve the space problems created by a changing and growing collection and 
new technology. Creative solutions will continue to be sought in the coming 
year. We look toward 1997 for the completion of a "library building program" 
which will provide the detailed analysis of the library facility and required 
expansion and renovation needs. 

Major changes in personnel took place throughout the year. Library Director, 
Sarah L. Rueter, retired on September 27, 1996. As Children's Service 
Librarian for 23 years, Mrs. Rueter developed one of the best children's 
collections in the Merrimack Valley. She introduced hundreds of children to 
the joys of reading through preschool story times. With her expertise in 
children's literature, she also provided personal assistance to parents and 
their children for many years. 

In September 1994, Sarah Rueter became Library Director at the Wilmington 
Memorial Library. During her brief two years as Library Director, Mrs. Rueter 
revitalized the public library through her energetic dedication and 
professional leadership. Her contributions include an improved materials 
collection, new technology, weekly press releases, and the development of a 
long range plan for the library. On September 24, the Board of Library 
Trustees and the library staff hosted a Retirement Ceremony for Mrs. Rueter. 
The generous response from local businesses who contributed to the successful 
event and the many library patrons who attended the ceremony not only 
indicated the high regard in which Mrs. Rueter was held but that the community 
appreciates and supports its public library. 

Christina Stewart, Reference and Adult Service Librarian and a member of the 
library staff for twenty- two years, was appointed Library Director on 
September 30. Eileen Broderick, Children's Services Librarian resigned in 
August, and Sharon Ruetenik was appointed Children's Services Librarian in 
September. Laura Hodgson, Circulation Librarian, was appointed Reference and 
Adult Services Librarian in October. Linda Callahan joined the staff as 
Circulation Librarian in November. Part-time Library Assistant, Keith Didion, 
resigned in the summer and was replaced by Linda Berlik. The entire library 
staff is once again acknowledged for their dedication, hard work and friendly 
service . 

During 1996, it became evident that the Wilmington Memorial Library is a 
positive force in the community. We look forward in 1997 to the challenge of 
responding to this role while keeping in mind that "the mission of the 
Wilmington Memorial Library is to ensure that all people of Wilmington have 
free and open access to information and ideas." 




-61- 



LIBRARY STAFF 



Administration : 
Christina Stewart, Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, PT Administrative Assistant 

Adult Services: 
Laura Hodgson, Reference and Adult Services Librarian 
Linda Callahan, Circulation Librarian 
Linda Berlik, Gena Lawson, PT Library Assistants 
Eric Brassil, Benjamin DeGennaro, PT Library Pages 

Children's Services: 
Sharon Ruetenik, Children's Librarian 
Susan MacDonald, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, PT Library Assistant 
Arlene TenDyke, Story Hour Assistant 
Chantal Auger, Elizabeth Berlik, Maya Persuad-Dubey , Kristen TenDyke 

PT Library Pages 

Technical Services : 
Laurel Toole, Head of Technical Services 
Anna Percuoco, Technical Services Assistant 
Dorothy Wiberg, Technical Services Assistant 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1996 



Hours Open Weekly 
Winter 



Summer 



Monday through Saturday 9-5 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 

Monday through Friday 9-5 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 



Population 

Registered Borrowers 

Holdings and Acquisitions 

Number of Volumes 
Books 

AV/Non- Print 
Volumes per capita 

Subscriptions 

Newspapers 

Periodicals 

Microfilm 

Museum Passes 

Circulation 

Circulation per capita 

Inter library Loan 

From other libraries 
To other libraries 

Reserves 

Reference and Reader's Services 
Meeting Room Reservations 



89, 492 
1,889 
4 .41 



7 .27 



2, 001 
2, 448 



56 



48 



20, 708 
15, 414 

91, 381 



8 

149 
12 



150, 364 
4, 449 

4, 969 
18 , 140 
80 



-62- 



Library Programs 152 

Pre-school 78 

Summer Reading Program 1 

Group visits 21 

Special programs 34 

Adult programs 18 

Total attendance at programs 3,177 

Pre-school 1,196 

Summer Reading Program 843 

Group visits 384 

Special programs 621 

Adult programs 133 

Exhibits and displays 46 

Children's Department 28 

Adult Department 18 



Elderly Services Department 

In 1996 we celebrated the lOth Anniversary of the Buzzell Senior Citizen 
Center. On January 26, 1986 the seniors reached their goal of renovating a 
boarded-up school into a Senior Citizen Center. At the dedication ceremony, 
the chairman of the committee stated, "this center will not only be for the 
senior citizens today, but for all those who will enjoy this building for many 
years to come." She was absolutely right. The majority of those seniors who 
worked so hard passed away a few years after seeing their dream come true. At 
the 10th year celebration, the remaining members of the renovation committee 
were honored: their attorney, James Banda, carpenter, Joseph Filipowicz, Ann 
Maclnnis, Margaret McNeill, architect, Richard Medeiros and carpenter, Raymond 
Miner . 

This gift to the town of a spacious Senior Citizen Center has allowed us to 
implement over 20 programs and classes. This year we added three new 
programs. A monthly sing-a-long, weekly sewing, knitting and crocheting 
classes and a bi-monthly nutrition class, all instructed by volunteers, well 
trained in what they are teaching. 

Again this year we were faced with many cases of elder abuse. The majority 
were psychological, coming from financial exploitation. More and more elder 
parents are moving in with children to help pay for household expenses . In 
some cases, this became a travesty for both parties. Arguments begin between 
family members and the senior over money. Tempers flare, the result elder 
abuse. I was able to remove a few who were unable to straighten out their 
difficulty, into elder housing, with the agreement of both parties. For them 
it is working out fine. 

Another type of abuse against elders this year was medical care through HMO's. 
Refusal of needed medical treatment for an ill patient and too early release 
of a senior after an operation have caused more serious medical problems or 
death for others. I joined other elder groups in protesting against HMO 
administrators depriving seniors of needed medical care. As a group, we 
requested the help of the Attorney General and Medicare Administration. Some 
progress was made, but not enough. I talked with attorneys from Elder Legal 
Services, Mr. Abbott the administrator of Medicare in Lowell, along with 
several politicians on behalf of a few of our seniors being abused by an HMO. 
I was instrumental in getting treatment for some and additional recuperating 
days in a hospital for others. I will continue to work with other directors 
in 1997 to put an end to HMO abuse of elders by depriving them of needed 
medical care. 

As Director of Elder Services, I met the needs of our seniors for financial 
help, through referrals to the Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions Clubs, Social 
Security (SSI) , Welfare Office (food stamps and Medicaid) , Community Teamwork 
(oil, gas or electricity, furnaces repaired or replaced with new ones), 
Deming Way for elder apartments, Minuteman Home Care (homemakers, protective 



-63- 



services) , Alzheimer and stroke support groups, mental health, drug and 
alcohol abuse, visiting nurse (in-home nursing care) . I held many counseling 
sessions, made home visits to shut-ins living alone with problems needing 
help. The Respite Care provider responded to all calls pertaining to 
transportation to medical appointments for seniors living alone with impaired 
vision and hearing, those in wheelchairs or with the aid of a walker. 

In 1996 we received 5,366 telephone calls. Transported 6,018 by minibus to 
medical and other elderly appointments, shopping and to the center, traveling 
15,104 miles. The Respite Care Provider transported 823 unable to use the 
minibus. We delivered 13,983 meals to home-bound seniors, traveling 22,107 
miles. At the lunch site 2,659 meals were served. We processed 149 
applications for fuel, weatherization, oil burner repairs or replacement. 




Ceramic Class at the Senior Center 



A total of 5,052 seniors were kept physically fit through our weekly exercise 
classes, dance class, walking on our treadmills and stationary bikes. The 
Senior Center had 5,286 participate in our activity programs and classes. 
1,616 in our medical programs, while 3,224 received assistance through our 
social programs. 

To the following we extend our thanks for enabling us to deliver the above 
services : 



The Taxpayers for approving our budget $121,146 

Community Teamwork 68,546 

Executive Office of Elder Affairs Grant 8,358 

Senior Citizen Fair 3,675 

Minuteman Home Care 333,124 
(covering 1,155 referrals) 



Federal, state and municipal departments. Town Manager, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Accountant, Board of Health, Public Buildings and Public Works for their help 
when requested. 

We also thank the Town Manager for his help and guidance and the following for 
their donations to the senior citizens: 



The Lions Club for their catered holiday dinner to shut ins. 

Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks for their annual dinner dance and donation 
toward the rental of their hall for our therapeutic socials. 



-64- 



Kiwanis Club for their $30 monthly donation to our needy seniors, and 
their annual shut-in dinner. 

Rotary Club for their $50 monthly DeMoulas gift certificate for a needy 
senior . 

Maple Meadow Gardens for their annual donation of a Christmas tree for 
the center. 

Dunkin Donuts for their yearly supply of donuts and filter fresh coffee. 
Analog Devices for their catered holiday dinner to shut-ins. 



Thanks to all the many 
seniors who volunteered 
hundred of hours visiting 
seniors in their homes, 
hospitals and nursing homes, 
instructing activity 
programs and classes and 
those who volunteer on odd 
jobs at the center and in 
homes for low income 
seniors. To all who helped 
in any way in making the 
lives of the elderly 
residents in Wilmington more 
meaningful in 1996, we are 
very grateful. 




Senior Citizens march in the Memorial Day Parade. 



Commission On Disabilities 

The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities was established to address the 
issues and concerns of the disabled community, their families and other 
interested parties. 

We are pleased to announce the appointment of a new commissioner, Mr. George 
O' Connell . 

One of the main accomplishments of the Commission during 1996 was our ability 
to work with the Wilmington Board of Selectmen in adopting a Policy on Conmon 
Victualer Licenses - Accessibility To Premises . This policy mandates that all 
applications for new and transfer of Common Victualer licenses shall be 
approved by the Board of Selectmen subject to the determination of 
accessibility of the premises to the public. In addition, the policy also 
states that applications for the renewal of Common Victualer licenses shall be 
approved by the Board of Selectmen subject to the determination of mandatory 
handicapped accessible parking with proper signage. The Commission will also 
be informed of any licenses to which the Board of Selectmen has granted 
exception . 

The Commission was also asked by Selectman James Rooney to participate in the 
Saint Thomas of Villanova Youth Center project. The Commission was invited to 
review handicap accessibility and building issues and offer recommendations. 
On-site surveys were conducted to ensure that all handicap specifications were 
up to code. The youth center is completely handicap accessible and barrier 
free . 

The Commission, in conjunction with the Massachusetts Office on Disabilities, 
sponsored a Community Access Monitor Seminar. This Seminar was conducted at 
the Shriner's Auditorium and was a complete success. 



-65- 



A continuing project of the Commission is to ensure an up-to-date Handicapped 
Resource Manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide to the community a 
complete reference of handicap services. The Commission is in the process of 
doing its annual update and would like your assistance. Anyone interested in 
having services listed, or having change in location, phone number or contact 
person, please feel free to contact any of the Commissioners. 

We have a continuing positive relationship with Wilmington' s ADA Committee, 
Wilmington Committee for Citizens with Disabilities and the Wilmington Special 
Needs Advisory Council. We look forward to working with these organizations 
to provide a better life for the disabled. 



This committee is responsible for providing recommendations to the Town 
Manager with respect to issues which are affected by the Americans with 
Disabilities Act (ADA). The act requires businesses, including 
municipalities, to make reasonable accommodations to ensure that their 
facilities, programs, services and employment opportunities are equally 
accessible to people of all abilities. 

In 1996 the Committee made several recommendations with respect to town 
services and operations. The ADA Committee recommended that the Board of 
Selectmen adopt a policy which would affect applications for new and 
transferred common victualer licenses and applications for renewal of common 
victualer licenses for establishments which serve food. The granting of such 
common victualer licenses would be conditioned upon the establishment's 
compliance with accessibility statutes. 

The Board of Selectmen adopted this recommendation in October. Factors which 
can now be considered by the Selectmen when reviewing a common victualer' s 
application include provisions for handicapped parking, proper signage, 
accessible bathrooms, ramps and curb cuts. 

Committee members also recommended that the town replace the existing Elderly 
Services van with a van which is handicapped accessible. The Town Manager has 
accepted this recommendation and is seeking funding in the fiscal year 1998 
budget to purchase a handicapped accessible van. 

Roger Lessard, Public Buildings Superintendent, updated the committee on the 
progress being made to make municipal buildings handicapped accessible. 



The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights & Measures 
for the year 1996. 



ADA Advisory Committee 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



Scales tested and sealed 
Truck scales tested and sealed 
Gas meters tested and sealed 
Adjustments to gas meters 
Apothecary weights tested and sealed 
Oil trucks tested and sealed 
Jewelry scale tested and sealed 
Random weights of commodities 
Complaints acted on 
Random sign checks 



60 
8 

162 
7 

116 
4 
1 

300 
1 
6 



Fees Collected 



$2, 386 . 00 



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Board of Appeals 



The Board of Appeals members are appointed by the Board of Selectmen for 
three-year terms. Associate members are appointed for one-year terms. The 
current members are Charles Boyle, Chairman, Louis Farkas and Philip Fenton 
Associate members are Anita Backman, John Forrest and Robert Doucette. The 
following cases were heard in 1996. 



Case 1-96 Craig S. Newhouse Map 8 part of Parcel 2 7A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient width for a single 
family dwelling for property located on Wabash Road. 

Granted 



Case 2-96 Loring Realty Trust Map 29 part of Parcels 15A,11Z 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 authorizing a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Chestnut Street. 

Granted - no more than two hcunmerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage 
and the lot shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 3-96 James E. Mahoney Map Rl Parcel 18F 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.8.11 Limited Service Restaurant for 
property located on 16 Upton Drive. 

Granted - must be established within one year and if not used for one year, 
special permit will lapse. 



Case 4-96 Charles G. Crescenzo Map 84 Parcel 57D 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for 
an inground pool for property located on 7 McGrane Road. 

Granted - no closer than 20 feet from the rear yard lot line and 24 1/2 feet 
from the side yard lot line for the life of the pool. 



Case 5-96 Vincent A. Chiricosta Map 107 Parcel 32 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback 
for a single family dwelling for property located on 4 Nottingham Drive. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 6-96 Wilmington Arena Authority Map 53 Parcel 178 & 178D 

To amend Case #54-94 by reducing the number of paved parking spaces from 250 
to 168, the current number of paved parking spaces for property located on 190 
Main 
Street . 

Granted - reducing number of paved parking spaces to 168 with additional 

parking in the unpaved overflow area and landscaping in the front 
of the building to be completed. 



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Case 7-96 



Marcia Armstrong 



Map 66 Parcel 72B 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 to allow an existing porch and shed to remain as 
situated in the side yard setback for property located on 8 Lawrence Street. 

Granted - to remain as situated in the side yard setback for the life 
of the porch and shed. 



Case 8-96 Paul Fitzpatrick Map 67 Parcel 75B 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback on 
Gorham Street for an addition for property located on 31 Cary Street. 

Granted - no closer than 31 feet from the front yard lot line on Gorham St. 



Case 9-96 Mark Minghella Map 60 Parcel 29 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard 
setback for property located on 216 Wildwood Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 10-96 Ralph A. Petrosino Map 11 Parcel 37 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback on 
Third Street for an addition for property located on 37 Albany Street. 

Granted - no closer than 16 feet from the front yard lot line on Third St. 



Case 11-96 William Smillie Map 41 Parcel 138 

A variance from Sec. 6.3.5.3 (Sign) proposing a 96.58 sq. ft. - 18 ft. high 
ground sign where a 50 sq. ft. - 15 ft. sign is allowed for property located 
on 579 Main Street. 

Granted - 50 sq. ft. not to exceed the height of 15 feet. 



Case 12-96 Wilmington Partners J.V. Map 71 Parcel 16 & 18 

A comprehensive permit in accordance with MGL, CH. 40B, to develop the parcel 
into 3 5 single family housing lots in accordance with the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and Wilmington Housing Partnership "Affordable Housing" programs 
for property located on 111 and 121 West Street. 

Granted - will expire twelve months from the date of the document unless 
substantial construction has commenced. 



Case 13-96 Craig S. Newhouse Map 8 Parcel pt 27A 

A permit in accordance with the official map, Sec. 8.3.4 authorizing the 
construction of a single family dwelling on a lot not having frontage on a 
road or street presently shown on or made part of the official map for 
property located on Wabash Road. 

Granted - applicant must make repair to Cochrane Road. 



Case 14-96 David M. McCue, Jr. Map 9 Parcel 63 

A permit in accordance with the official map, Sec. 8.3.4 authorizing the 
construction of a single family dwelling on a lot not having frontage on a 
road or street presently shown on or made part of the official map for 
property located on Buckingham Street. 



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Granted - 



The applicant must repair any portion of the existing roadways 
disturbed during the construction of this lot. 



Case 15-96 Kristin M. Palkowski Map 19 Parcel 13A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 to allow an existing deck to remain as situated 
within the rear yard setback at property located at 74 Aldrich Road. 

Granted - 14 feet from the rear yard lot line for the life of the deck. 



Case 16-96 James Newhouse Map 9 Parcel 75 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a pre-existing lot having insufficient rear and side yard setbacks 
for property located on Wakefield Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 17-96 Scott & Denise Winn Map 84 Parcel 36 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for 
an above ground pool for property located on 8 McDonald Road. 

Granted - no closer than 15 feet for the rear yard lot line and 15 feet from 
the side/front yard lot line on Hooker Street, for the life of the 
pool . 



Case 18-96 E. Michael Gautreau Map 19 Parcel 15 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard 
setback for an above ground pool for property located on 84 Aldrich Road. 

Granted - no closer than 12 feet from the rear yard lot line and 15 feet 
from the side yard lot line, for the life of the pool. 



Case 19-96 Joseph Parella Map 9 Parcel 61 

A permit to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having frontage on a 
constructed road which is not on or made part of the official map/Buckingham 
Street . 

Granted - any damage to the road during construction must be repaired by the 
applicant . 



Case 20-96 Edward White Map 34 Parcel pt 159A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient frontage 
and width for a single family dwelling for property located on Lake Street. 

Granted - Lot is split by Wilmington/Tewksbury Town Line. Lot has required 
frontage in Wilmington. Meets zoning except for lot width. Shape 
of lot presents hardship. 



Case 21-96 Alfred F. Rolli Map 10 Parcel 11 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for 
an in ground pool for property located on 22 Buckingham Street. 

Granted - no closer than 15 feet from the side yard lot line with 

stipulations stated in a letter from the Wilmington Board of 
Health dated September 4, 1996. 



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Case 22-96 Sven Wiberg Map 95 Parcel 1 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for 
a barn for property located on 42 High Street. 

Granted - no closer than 13 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 23-96 Michael Buonopane Map 55 Parcel 94 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for 
an existing pool for property located on Everett Avenue. 

Granted - to remain as situated 8 feet from the side yard lot line and 17 
feet from the front yard lot line on Everett Avenue. 



Case 24-96 James & Maria Assetta Map 55 Parcel 238 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard 
setback for a shed for property located on 6 Walker Street. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the side yard lot line and 8 feet from 
the rear yard lot line for the life of the shed. 



Case 25-96 I. Fred DiCenso Trust Map 56 Parcel 122 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.2.8 to construct a communications 
tower for property located on 65 Industrial Way. 

Granted - not to exceed a height of 190 feet, no guide wires and the Fire 
Department to be located on tower for free. 



Case 26-96 Frank Olson Map 20 Parcel 27 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback 
for a farmer's porch for property located on 18 Hardin Street. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the front yard lot line. 



Case 27-96 Homan's Associates, Inc. Map 79 Parcel 31 

A variance from Sec. 6.3.5, 6.3.5.1 and 6.3.5.2 (Permitted Signs) for property 
located on 3 55 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - 4 - 12" x 6' signs and 1 - 58" x 15' 6" sign. 



Case 28-96 Wilmington 4th of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

A special permit for a carnival from July 2 through July 7, 1996 for property 
located on Church Street. 



Granted 



Case 2 9-96 Michael Buonopane Map 5 5 Parcel 94 

A permit to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having frontage on a 
constructed road which is not on or made part of the official map for property 
located on Everett Avenue. 

Granted - any demiage to the road during construction must be repaired. 



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Case 30-96 



Willard M. Swan 



Map 65 Parcel 5B 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot hav 
for a garage for property located on 246 

Granted - no closer than 20 feet from 
closer than 37 feet from the 
a paved turnaround in front 



ing insufficient front yard setback 
Middlesex Avenue. 

the side yard on Colonial Drive and no 

front yard on Middlesex Avenue, with 
of the garage. 



Case 31-96 James & Karen Pettigrew Map 36 Parcel 206 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for 
a pool for property located on 4 Flagstaff Road. 

Granted - no closer than 15 feet from the side yard lot line for the life of 
the pool. 



Case 32-96 Joseph Guzzo Map 23 Parcel 8 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback 
for a porch for property located on 510 Shawsheen Avenue. 

Granted - no closer than 36 feet from the front yard lot line, with the 
stipulation, cannot be closed in. 



Case 33-96 Aaron Brown Map 72 Parcel 26 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 to subdivide a lot into two 
nonconforming lots for property located on 20 Nickerson Avenue. 

Pending 



Case 34-96 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Map R2 Parcel 20D 

A special permit from Sec. 5.2.8.1 for a communications tower to be 150 feet 
high at property located on 195 Ballardvale Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 35-96 Rickshaw Express Map 4 Parcel 6 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.8.5, Limited Service Restaurant, 
for property located on 35 Lowell Street. 

Pending 



Case 36-96 Thomas J. Marden Map 84 Parcel 67 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for 
an addition for property located on 27 McDonald Road. 

Granted - no closer than 13 feet from the rear yard lot line. 



Case 37-96 Richard Stone Map 19 Parcel 13D 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for 
an aboveground pool for property located on 8 Bailey Road. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the side yard lot line and 10 feet 
from the rear yard lot line for the life of the pool. 



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Case 37-96 CM Realty Trust Map 43 Parcel 4 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.16 to operate a vehicular 
dealership at 275 Main Street. 

Granted - a Special Permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.16 of the Wilmington 
Zoning By-laws to operate a vehicular dealership at 275 Main 
Street . 



Case 39-96 Miklos & Gloria Szabo Map 7 Parcel 42A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for 
a garage for property located on 17 Roosevelt Road. 

Pending 



Case 40A-96 Russell Stanton Map 83 Parcel 24 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 to allow a single family 
dwelling to remain as situated on a lot having insufficient area, frontage, 
lot width and side yard setback for property located on 9 Cobalt Street. 

Denied 



Case 40B-96 Russell Stanton Map 83 Parcel 24 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 to allow a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient area, frontage, lot width and side yard 
setback for property located at 9 Cobalt Street. 

Denied 



Case 41-96 Shawsheen River Estates Map 106 

To amend the Comprehensive Permit Case #46-88 for property located at 
Shawsheen River Estates. 

Granted - with stipulations as proposed by the Planning Board and the 
Board of Appeals. 



Case 42-96 Jerry Tuzzolo, Supervalu Map R3 Parcel 44 

A variance from Sec. 6.3 to add a second sign to property located at 340 
Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - for second sign to be no closer than 10 feet from the front yard 
lot line. 



Case 43-96 Spring PCS Map R3 Parcel SOB 

A special permit for relief from Sec. 5.2.8.1 to allow construction of a 150 
foot tall PCS wireless telecommunications tower on property located at 375 
Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - For 150' tower with conditions set at site plan review. 



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Council for the Arts 



The month of April in 1996 marked the tenth anniversary of the decision by 
voters at the Annual Tovm Meeting in 1986 to develop the vacant "Old Town 
Hall" as a center for the arts. Culturally and socially the town has been 
enriched by the programs and events sponsored by the Wilmington Council for 
the Arts at this center in the ensuing ten years. It was indeed a judicious 
vote! Concerts, classes in painting, art demonstrations, art exhibitions, 
lectures, dance and drama classes, musical recitals and weekly rehearsals of 
the Merrimack Valley Chapter of "Sweet Adelines," a vocal music group, poetry 
readings, a spectacular Annual Hobby Show, and the holiday presentation of the 
"Festival of Trees" with the Garden Club were all presented during 1996. 

The Wilmington Council is in part supported by the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council whose purpose is to raise funds to be used for community arts. Their 
objective is to promote cultural resources, to ensure the continued 
contribution of these resources to local communities, and to involve as many 
citizens as possible in some aspect of cultural activity. To this end in 
1996, the Council distributed $5,879 in grants to applicants. Passes to the 
Museum of Fine Arts and the Gardner Museum were awarded to be distributed by 
the Wilmington Public Library. A grant, as requested by the Wilmington 
Council, to permit their continuation of the Arts Center (programming, 
classes, art exhibitions and demonstrations, art purchases and upkeep) was 
approved by the state council. 

The Sixteenth Annual Art Exhibition was held on Saturday and Sunday, June 22 
and 23. Much effort goes into this yearly event on the part of council 
members; the workers under the supervision of Roger Lessard, Superintendent of 
Public Buildings, who were responsible for a professional floor refurbishing; 
those who did the hanging of most of the 150 pieces of artwork: David Maison, 
Joseph Moreau, Fran Nola, Lou Doto, Jane and Roy Crane; and Gussie Rice who 
compiled and printed the programs. 



Margurite Elia 
won the John D. 
Brooks award for 
her acrylic 
"Ogunquit Surf" 
and this 
painting also 
won second place 
in 

oils/acrylics . 
The "Most 
Popular" vote 
went to Ruth 
Laider for her 
pastel, "Tulips" 
which also won 
first place in 
pastels, pen and 
ink. In 
Watercolors , 
awards were won 
by Evelyn 
Anderson, David 
Maison, Carol 
McBride, and 
merit awards 
were given to 
Jane Crane, 
Carol Wilson and 
Madeleine 
DeSesa . 




Demonstration of pastel painting at the Arts Council. 



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In Oils and Acrylics first, second, and third prizes were awarded to Mary 
Saija, Marguerite Elia, and to Ed Manzi for his still life. The Council 
purchased this still life for its permanent collection, and Mr. Manzi made a 
generous donation to the Council by a liberal reduction in the price of the 
painting . 

After Ruth Laider's first place for her "Tulips" second place was awarded to 
Paul Savage for his pencil/pen and ink and third place went to Lexie Donahue 
in this medium. In Photography, Barrett Bacall, Olivia Zambon and Ian 
Davidson were awarded first, second and third prizes. 

In the students' exhibition, first, second and third prizes were awarded to 
Jane Crane, Carol Wilson and Marilyn Sullivan. 

Three professional artists judged the show: 

Peregrin F. Schwarzer of the Frederick Gallery, Littleton - Custom Framing. 
Laura Elkins-Stover of Gloucester - Artists, Oils and Pastels, founding member 
of the Saltbox Gallery of Topsfield. Michelle Rossi-Voorhees of Manchester, 
Naimo Gallery Director/Curator. 

Classes in watercolor instruction were provided again this year by our long- 
time popular teacher, Louise Anderson. And in addition to Louise Anderson's 
two classes on Fridays, Carolyn Latanision, well-known talented artist held 
two classes in watercolor on Mondays. 

An important lecture with SRO was presented by the Council on Saturday, April 
13, by Mr. Charles Movalli of Gloucester. His subject was John Singer 
Sargent. There are many who think of Sargent as an English artist, but he 
was, in fact, American, having been born to American parents in Florence, 
Italy in 1856. Mr. Movalli has demonstrated and lectured on both this 
continent and in Europe. He has edited nine art books and written over 60 
articles as a contributing editor to American Artist magazine. 

Four demonstrations were held throughout the year by Caroline Doucette, a 
watercolorist of Nashua, NH; Nancy Davis Johnson, watercolorist of Windham, 
NH; Laura Elkins-Stover of Gloucester, an artist in oils and pastels who was 
one of the judges for the Sixteenth Annual Exhibition in June. On November 
3rd, Rebecca Kemp, an artist versed in wildlife and fantasy art gave a very 
informative and interesting demonstration of her work in acrylics. 

Acting classes for youngsters were again sponsored this year. Miss Judith 
Durkee was director. 

The Second Annual Model Show under the direction of Mr. Roy Crane was held on 
April 20th. These shows are spectacular with boats, planes, cars and trains - 
- breathtaking in their detail and size. 

For the first time a poetry reading was presented at the Arts Center. 
Although inclement weather forced the cancellation of the reading on Sunday, 
October 20, the event rescheduled to November 10 was most successful. Those 
participating in the reading were Anne Buzzell, Dan Murphy and Hinda Paquette. 
Students reading were Stacey Kendall, William Kent and Anthony Cucchaia. On 
Sunday, December 15, 1996 an English handbell concert featuring the Handbell 
Choir of the Wilmington United Methodist Church was sponsored by the Arts 
Council. Sacred and secular selections and a community sing, all in the 
spirit of the holiday season, were enjoyed by the audience. 

And again this year the Arts Council joined the Garden Club in the "Festival 
of Trees" on Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3. The beautiful Arts 
gallery was transformed into a virtual fairyland with trees decorated by 
various clubs and groups. Just Beautiful! 

Although not sponsored by the Arts Council, the Arts Center was the scene of a 
happy gathering by the Wilmington Women's Club at a formal tea in the 
observance of their 95th Anniversary. It was held on Saturday, September 7. 
The beauty of the gallery was enhanced by elegant table appointments and a 
special art exhibition. 



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The Council very much appreciates the assistance of town departments under the 
direction of Roger Lessard and Bob Palmer. 

Officers of the Council for the Arts are: David Maison, Chairman; Elizabeth 
White, Assistant Chairman; Anne Buzzell, Treasurer; Jane Crane, Recording 
Secretary; Frances Keough, Corresponding Secretary/Publicity. 

They are grateful for the support of the townspeople. 




Members of the "Strings Attached" group perform at the Arts Council. 




Metropolitan Area Planning Council 



MAPC's list of activities and accomplishments for 1996 is a long and varied 
one. The agency is completing one of its most productive years with both 
staff and Council members continuing to work hard to keep up with the 
opportunities and challenges as they are presented. 

Perhaps the single most notable achievement in 1996 was the successful 
restructuring of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) . The MPO which 
has been composed of six agencies (four state agencies plus the MBTA Advisory 
Board and MAPC) is responsible for allocating financial resources from the 
federal government to various transportation projects in the metropolitan 
region. MAPC has argued for years that the organization needed to be changed 
in order to have better representation by local communities. When a 1995 
federal review of the organization found substantial deficiencies in the 
existing process, the agency played a major leadership role in working with 
the other five MPO members to design the new organization. In addition to the 
existing members, the new MPO will include the City of Boston, the Turnpike 
Authority and three cities and three towns. The new agreement also provides 
that at least $40,000,000 will be made available for local highway projects in 
the MAPC region. The community representatives to the MPO will have the 
decision making power for how that money is to be spent . 

Elections to fill the six new community positions will take place in early 
1997 at a MAPC Council meeting. Candidates must obtain the nomination of the 
chief elected officials from five communities to be on the ballot. With the 
exception of the Inner Core subregion, no subregion may have more than one 
community on the MPO. Local communities now have a voice and a vote in this 
important transportation process. 

MAPC's GIS Lab has continued to grow and provide new services to its 
communities. The staff conducted a series of eight workshops on GIS data 
automation. The focus of the workshops was on assessor map automation. In 
addition to working on defining policy areas for MetroPlan 2000, the staff is 
also putting together a map of existing and potential bike paths throughout 
the MAPC region. 

The agency continues to produce the Planner's Exchange series. This year 
there were two reports; "Community Reuses of Failed Septic Systems" and 
"Development Guides." 

Among the several hundred meetings that the agency sponsors each year, there 
were several of particular note. MAPC brought in a noted national authority 
on Transit Oriented Development (TOD) . As a result of that meeting, the 
agency has formed a TOD advisory committee that will be working to encourage 
more concentrated development throughout the region. Another of these special 
meetings was an informational session on the Governor's Executive Order 384 
which provided for the sunsetting of state regulations after a review process 
to determine which regulations were determined to be outdated or obsolete. 

The agency continued its affiliation with the Challenge to Leadership program. 
This program sponsors a forum every fall for business, educational, religious, 
labor and government leaders to explore civic issues. The forum for this year 
was "Youth and Jobs in the 21st Century: Is Massachusetts Ready for the New 
Millennium? " 

Another in a series of MAPC sponsored Community Dialogues was presented. The 
focus was also on job training. MIT, UMass, the Federal Reserve Bank of 
Boston and Boston Edison were partners with the agency for this event. 

MAPC's efforts in the legislative arena continued to be productive. Much of 
the agency's priority legislation was passed into law. The agency also 
continued to work with the Massachusetts Audubon Society to draft legislation 
which will serve to coordinate and streamline the participation of federal, 
state, regional and municipal agencies in a statewide land information system 



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institution utilizing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) . On the federal 
level MAPC began working with other organizations across the country on the 
process of reauthorizing the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act 
(ISTEA) . 

Planning continues on the Inner Circumferential Project and the North and 
South Rail Link. MAPC is active in both of these projects. The agency also 
continues to expand its help to communities on a diversity of transportation 
projects such as the Enhancement Grant Program and Transportation Demand 
Management Grant Program. 

The eight subregions of the agency also continued working on their numerous 
projects. Several documents were produced this year as part of the 
Subregional Special Project program. Among those reports of region wide 
interest are: "The MAPC Grant Source," "Revitalizing Inner Core Commercial 
Areas and Squares" and "Environmental Tourism Strategies for the North Shore. 
Copies of these reports are available at the agency. 

The nine communities of the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) meet 
monthly to discuss issues of mutual concern. One of the priority issues for 
the group for this past year has been updating their subregional water supply 
protection study. The group also continues its very active interest in 
transportation issues. Route 3 North, the interchange at Routes 128 and 93, 
and the Route 1/114 corridor study continue to be issues of critical concern 
for the group. Additionally, NSPC reviewed the TIP, the regional 
transportation plan and the new bicycle plan. The group heard special 
presentations on the new DEP initiatives and economic development issues at 
their regular meeting. They have also continued to hold some of their 
meetings in the evening to make it possible for more local officials to 
attend. 

Staff provided the community's consultant with demographic information. 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the Annual Report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Department of Public Works for the year 1996. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, 
Cemetery, Parks and Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. The coordinating 
of all the activities of all divisions allows the town the optimum use of 
manpower, equipment and materials which control cost. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 

All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as 
sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the roadsides, picking up trash 
along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Safety Projects : 

The finish hot top was installed on the Nichols Street sidewalk from 
Fairmeadow Road to the Tewksbury line on the east side and from Fairmeadow 
Road to Flagstaff Road on the west side. 

The preliminary survey work has been completed for the third phase of the 
town's reinstituted sidewalk construction program. The construction will 
begin in the spring. 

The sidewalks are proposed on Adams Street to Parker Street a distance of 
1,883 feet; Parker Street to Lowell Street a distance of 1,778 feet; Shawsheen 
Avenue in the area of Ferguson Road to Carter Lane a distance of 860 feet; and 
Carter Lane to the West Intermediate School for a distance of 1,411 feet. 



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The construction of these sidewalks will improve the safety of school children 
who walk to school and will expand our network of sidewalks for the safety of 
all residents. 

Intersection Improvements: Improved the site distance coming out of Gushing 
Drive and Shawsheen Avenue by removing the trees, shrubs and regrading the 
property of Mr. & Mrs. Enos at 227 Shawsheen Avenue. I would like to take the 
opportunity to publicly thank Mr. & Mrs. Enos for allowing the Department of 
Public Works onto their property to correct this safety problem. 

Chapter 90 
Improvements : A 
finish course of hot 
top was applied on 
Clark Street and 
Railroad Avenue. 

Drainage: Drainage 
ditches, systems and 
culverts were 
installed, repaired, 
flushed or extended at 
the following 
locations: Lowell 
Street, Burlington 
Avenue, Brattle 
Street, Concord 
Street, Aldrich Road, 
Jonspin Road, Nichols 
Street, Glen Road, 
Adams Street, Jere 
Road, Railroad Avenue, 
Woburn Street, 
Pinewood Road and 
Boutwell Street. 

The Town placed a special emphasis on cleaning out the wetlands. 

Stream Maintenance 
Program : The town 
implemented a stream 
and brook maintenance 

program during the summer. A crew of five and a supervisor were hired to 
clean by hand some of the streams and brooks throughout town. The stream and 
brook maintenance program evolved from a joint effort between the Department 
of Public Works and the Conservation Department with its goal to restore the 
quality of the streams and brooks and reduce flooding. The stream and brook 
maintenance program was a great success and has been included in the FY98 
budget for funding. 

Snow & Ice Removal : The Highway Division recorded 116.75" of snow for the 
winter of 1996 - 1997. The average snow fall is 54.0." The 116.75" of snow 
is the most we ever recorded. Snow & Ice removal is very expensive. It cost 
over $580,000 to keep our roads safe and free from ice and snow. 

Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying and tree removal. We removed 43 roadside trees that were 
dead or interfered with public safety. Hornet nests were removed upon request 
from residents. The Town Common was illuminated again this year with a fine 
display of Christmas lights. 

Dutch Elm Disease : We removed 6 Dutch Elm diseased trees. 

Mosquito Control : The town contracts its mosquito control out to the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project, who currently provides services to 28 
cities and towns throughout Middlesex and Worcester counties. 




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The project's headquarters is located at 111 Otis Street, Northboro, MA. 
Tours of the headquarters or visits to field work sites may be arranged by 
calling the office in advance. Telephone (508) 393-3055. 

The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito Management (IMM) , blending state of 
the art methods and techniques with expertise, experience, and scientific 
research to provide member communities with modern, environmentally sound, 
cost effective mosquito control. 

The Mosquito Awareness Program which is offered to elementary schools in our 
district has become very popular. Project staff meet with students and 
teachers to discuss mosquito biology, mosquito habitat, and control 
procedures. Much of the presentation is directed towards what the children 
and their families can do to prevent mosquitoes from breeding around their 
homes. Live samples of mosquito larvae are included with the presentation, 
and are left in the classrooms so that students can watch them develop. 
Slides, videos, handouts, and coloring books help to make this an interesting 
program. 

As part of the effort to reduce the need for pesticides they continue to 
expand their water management program. By cleaning clogged and overgrown 
waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are restored, and water 
quality is improved. 

BTI mosquito larvacide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are found. 
They routinely check known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to 
notify them of any areas they suspect could breed mosquitoes. Field crews 
will investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 

The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or 
larviciding but it is recognized that there are times when adult mosquito 
spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases residential and 
recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted 
sprayers . 

The project's surveillance program monitors adult mosquito and larval 
population density and is the backbone for prescribing various control 
techniques. Rain gauges are set out and data collected by surveillance crews 
in an effort to predict when mosquito breeding will occur. 

The project's video "Working for You" is available to anyone interested in 
learning about mosquito control and the services provided by the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, foundations for 
monuments were poured, etc. 

Burials 



Died in Wilmington 26 

Died Elsewhere 70 

Non-Residents 52 

Cremations 14 

Infants 4 

166 

Reserve 



Sale of Lots $38,308.00 



Receipts 

Interments $53,986.00 
Foundations for $ 4,234.50 

monuments 
Deeds $ 95.00 

Copy of Deeds ^ 4 . 00 

$58, 319. 50 

Trust Fund 

Perpetual Care $44,631.00 
TOTAL $141,258.50 



-79- 




Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, marking ballfields for baseball, softball, football, 
field hockey and soccer. Also, all fields and parks were fertilized. 

The Boutwell 
School and 
Wildwood School 
tennis and 
basketball 
courts have been 
upgraded, sealed 
and painted. 

The driveway at 
the Shawsheen 
School was 
relocated to 
allow for a new 
traffic flow for 
the safety of 
the children. 



The Glen Road 
fields were 
upgraded . We 
installed an 
irrigation 
system and 
hydro- seeded the 
fields . 

The Woburn 
Street School 

fields are being reconstructed and are about 70% complete. We installed an 
irrigation system and regraded the fields. They will be completed in the 
spring . 

Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions 
with engineering related projects, such as, but not limited to: 

Highway Division: With the layout and construction specifications for 
sidewalks and with solutions to drainage problems and other engineering 
related work. 

Planning Board & Conservation Commission: Reviewed subdivision plans and made 
recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction . 

Household Rubbish Collection. Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 

The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works. If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

I would like to compliment and thank the 60% of the residents who are 
recycling, and the other 40%, please start! Every ton that is removed from 
the waste stream and recycled saves the town $130.00 in disposal costs. 




Parks and Grounds personnel prepare fields for play. 



Water & Sewer Division (658-4711) 

Water : The wells located at Brown's Crossing, Barrow's, Butter's Row, and 
Chestnut Street lA were cleaned and refurbished. The pumps were tested and 
repaired to maximize pumping capacity. 



-80- 





Curbside recycling at work in Wilmington. 



The Department has begun replacing 2 inch galvanized iron water mains with 8 
inch ductile iron using the towns work force. This allows us to upgrade the 
water system and install fire hydrants at a reasonable cost to the town. 

A contract was awarded to Weston & Sampson Engineers to design and construct 
the raw water main from the Shawsheen Avenue Pump Station to the Butter's Row 
Water Treatment Plant . 

New chlorinators were installed in the Butter's Row Water Treatment Plant. 
These chlorinators replace the sixteen year old existing chlorinators. This 
piece of equipment injects a predetermined amount of chlorine gas into the 
finish water. This ensures that no live bacteria is present in the drinking 
water supply. 

During the spring months, a comprehensive water main flushing and valve 
exercising program was performed. This program aids in removing sediments in 
the water mains, identifies which fire hydrants need repair and helps ensure 
that the water gates in the system remain in good working condition. Needed 
repairs on the identified broken hydrants and water gates are also performed 
during this time period. 

The department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
town. In addition, the department removes the snow around fire hydrants and 
assists the Highway Department with roadway snow removal . 

The water rate, by vote of the Water and Sewer Commission, was reduced 13.1 
percent. This changes the rate from $2.83 per hundred cubic feet to $2.46 per 
hundred cubic feet . 



Pumping Statistics: 



Maximum Gallons Per Day 5,111,700 

Maximum Gallons Per Week 32,078,700 

Maximum Gallons Per Month 123,453,400 

Average Gallons Per Day 3,145,963 

Average Gallons Per Month 95,689,720 

Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 1,148,276,650 

Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 1,219,408,800 



-81- 



Precipitation Statistics: 



Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 
Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 

Consumption Statistics: 



Municipal Use 
Percentage of 
Residential Us 
Percentage of 
Industrial Use 
Percentage of 
Total Metered 
Percentage of 
Unaccounted fo 
Percentage of 



(Gallons) 
Total Pumped 
e (Gallons)* 
Total Pumped 

(Gallons) 
Pumped 

Use (Gallons)** 
Total Pumped 
r Use (Gallons) 
Total Pumped 



61 . 90" 
116.75" 



5, 726, 575 
01% 

541, 799, 079 
47% 

377, 741, 586 
33% 

925, 267, 240 
81% 

223, 009,410 
19% 



Residential use includes all residences and small commercial users 
using 5/8 inch meters. 

The difference between water pumped and water metered represents 
unaccounted for water use and consists of water used for flushing mains, 
main breaks, fighting fires, street sweeping, etc. 



Water Distribution System: 



The following new water mains were constructed in 1996: 

Location Length Size Hydrants 



Veranda Avenue 


295' 


6" 


1 


Burnap Road 


270' 


6" 





Park Avenue 


225' 


8" 


1 


Birch Road 


1800' 


8" 


3 


Westdale Avenue 


480' 


8" 


2 


Presidential Drive 


800' 


8" 


2 


Serenoa Lane 


720' 


8" 


3 


Somerset Place 


1600' 


8" 


3 


Wakefield Avenue 


150' 


8" 


1 


Cherry Street 


200' 


8" 


1 


Colonial Drive 


395' 


8" 


2 


White Pines 


440' 


12" 





Upton Court 


750' 


12" 


2 



Total water mains installed in 1996 were 565 feet of 6 inch, 6,370 feet of 8 
inch and 1,190 feet of 12 inch. There were 21 hydrants and 118 services 
installed . 



Sewerage Collection System: 



Sewer : The department visually inspected all sewer manholes in town to 
determine if the mains needed cleaning. It was determined the sewer system in 
the southern part of town did need cleaning. The sewer mains on Main Street, 
Eames Street, Woburn Street, and Industrial Way were flushed of debris and 
sediments to restore maximum flow capacity. 

The Lowell Street sewer design is nearly complete. This project will be 
reviewed and if approved will be constructed with the Lowell Street 
improvement project. 

The Water and Sewer Commission has reduced the sewer rate for the fourth 
consecutive year. The rate decrease for FY97 was 13.2 percent, changing the 
rate from $3.11 per hundred cubic feet to the new rate of $2.70 per hundred 
cubic feet. 



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The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 1996: 



Location Length Size 

Park Avenue 250' 8" 

West Jamaica Avenue 22 5' 8" 

Cherry Street 200' 8" 

Cunningham Street 720' 10" 



Total sewer laterals installed in 1996 were 675 feet of 8 inch and 720 feet o 
10 inch. There were 87 new sewer service connections made to the system. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Police Department for keeping the Department of Public Works informed during 
the winter months of the road conditions, between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 
6:30 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays and all various departments for 
their cooperation extended during the year. I would like to thank the Town 
Manager, the Assistant Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their 
support throughout the year. Last but not least, to the employees of the 
Department of Public Works who made 1996 a very productive year, my sincere 
thanks and appreciation. 




New street sweeper cleans streets after a snowy winter 



-83- 



Wilmington Public Schools 



The Strategic Plan of the Wilmington Public Schools states that our mission is 
to "provide a student -centered education which fosters critical inquiry 
enabling the individual to be a productive citizen, respectful of self and 
others, capable of adapting to a changing world and its technology." The 
eight (8) strategies in the Plan are designed to systematically improve the 
school system to enable us to realize our mission. Toward that end, goals are 
set each year with the Wilmington School Committee. 

Two major goals address needs in the areas of curriculum and staff 
development. The position of Curriculum Coordinator was added to the 
Wilmington Public Schools. Dr. Lore Nielsen assumed her responsibilities for 
curriculum, instruction, and professional development in August. Some key 
accomplishments in the past five months include the following. 

o A leadership retreat for all administrators and directors exploring 

issues of change related to the district's strategic plan. 

o The formation of a Mathematics Task Force that has assessed the current 

status of secondary mathematics instruction, recommended a new textbook 
series for grades six through eight, and defined a secondary mathematics 
course of study. 

o The development of a five year Technology Plan to give direction to the 

district's implementation of technology infrastructure to support 
instructional and administrative functions. 

o Assessment of the current status of the total curriculum, development of 

a long-term improvement cycle, and recommendation of emergency textbook 
needs . 

o Establishment of a Professional Development Committee to make program 

and budget recommendations for the district's staff development program. 

o Expansion of the PALMS (Partnerships Advancing the Learning of 

Mathematics and Science) to include all schools and to implement a 
comprehensive set of action steps for 1996-1997. 

o Recommendation and plan for implementation of a districtwide 

standardized achievement test beginning spring 1997. 

Completing the central office team is the new Director of Administration and 
Finance, Bradford Jackson, who brings four years of professional experience as 
a school business administrator to the position as well as extensive community 
service in Wilmington. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

As 1996 came to a close, the high school was finalizing a number of new 
initiatives as we continue to implement the Education Reform Act of 1993. In 
the spring of 1997, two different models of block scheduling will be piloted 
with one of them being finalized and implemented in the fall of 1997. 
advanced placement classes are in preparation to begin in the fall of 1997 
also, with designated teachers making their plans in the fall of 1996 and 
spring of 1997. 

The High School worked on a technology plan and has submitted it as part of 
the system's overall plan. It includes replacing typewriters with word 
processors, establishing some classroom labs and providing students and 
teachers with access to computers, programs and research through the Internet. 

Seven teachers spent two days at a "Facing History and Ourselves" workshop 
that dealt with prejudice and decision making. Plans are to develop this into 
an interdisciplinary course as well as several units to be woven into the 
present curriculum. 



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The academic climate has improved using positive reinforcement as well as 
tighter discipline with a revised in-house suspension program for those 
students who violate school rules. This has been complimented by an increase 
in school spirit as witnessed by the first ever Spirit Week, which was a huge 
success. A new student recognition program went into place called Student-of- 
the-Month. Each department selects a student per month who had exhibited 
outstanding work. The student gets honored with a Wildcat Pride Pin, a 
certificate, coupons at Burger King and their photo displayed in the school's 
main lobby. 

English Department 

In response to the curriculum frameworks recommended by the state, the English 
Department at Wilmington High presents challenging opportunities for all 
students to become lifelong learners in four critical areas: understanding 
the dynamics, nature, and history of the English language; responding 
thoughtfully to all forms of spoken and written literature; writing clearly, 
coherently and with personal engagement; and becoming effective users of 
electronic media. 

The English Department offers a summer reading program, a verbal S.A.T. 
preparation course in the spring and in the fall, and opportunities for public 
performances through the drama club. Students participate in local and 
national writing contests and are frequently published in The 21st Century . 
This year three students were winners in the VFW Voice of Democracy Essay 
contest . 

Social Studies Department 

Robert Cripps has been appointed as the new chairperson of the Social Studies 
Department. We have also added a new teacher to our department staff in the 
person of Sarah "Sally" Zimmerli. The new advanced placement course has an 
enrollment of twenty-two dedicated students. 

The department has been very active in social studies happenings throughout 
the year such as a realistic "Mock Election" for state and national offices, 
complete with the town's voting machines. Students have participated in a 
major essay project at Framingham State and the Student Government Day program 
that takes place at the State House. We have also developed a program in 
observation of Memorial Day and the Social Studies Student-of - the-Month 
Program. Advanced placement students will be heavily involved in the National 
History Day 1997 contest to be held at Salem State. 

The Department has also taken the lead in helping prepare the teachers of 
tomorrow, with two student teachers doing pre-practicums and two doing their 
actual student teaching at the High School. 

Science Department 

In 1996 the Wilmington High School Science Department continued its work 
toward updating the curriculum for grades 6-12. A study group grant from the 
Department of Education was used as a funding source to bring middle and high 
school science teachers together to examine existing course content for 
alignment with the Massachusetts State Curriculum Frameworks in Science and 
Technology. This effort was most helpful in highlighting areas in which the 
existing curriculum is strong and identifying other areas which need 
fortification. The ongoing efforts of the district's PALMS Leadership Team in 
establishing a systemic improvement plan for both math and science education 
helped to provide guidance for the curriculum renewal process. 

One of the more publicized activities which grew from Science Department 
involvement was participation in the US FIRST Robotics Competition. Textron 
Systems Division of Wilmington sponsored a team consisting of 25 honors 
physics students along with members of the Robotics Club organized by Mr. 
Arthur Haynes . For six very intensive weeks the students worked side by side 
with 18 engineers and several machinists from Textron to develop a robot for 



-85- 



the competition. The RoboCats finished in sixteenth place in a field of 48 
teams in the New England Regional Competition held at New Hampshire College. 
An awards ceremony was held at Textron in the spring to honor each of the 
RoboCats . 

Science faculty and students from both the North Intermediate and West 
Intermediate Schools participated in the Future Scientists and Engineers of 
America program (FSEA) sponsored by Analog Devices. The after-school program 
engaged students in hands-on activities which incorporate science and math 
concepts with technology education skill development. Students constructed a 
variety of devices, such as fan-powered cars, and then competed in races to 
evaluate the strength of their designs. 

Science fairs were held for all students enrolled in science grades 6-12. 
Prizes for the high school science fair were provided by Winchester Hospital. 
Five of the top high school contestants went on to compete at the Region IV 
Science Fair at Somerville High School. 

A team of five teachers was selected in the spring for participation in the 
Simmons College EnviroNet Project. The project involves the development of an 
environmental science curriculum with strong telecommunications involvement. 
As the curriculum grows, students will be networked with others across the 
state via the Internet to share collected field data and communicate insights 
and conclusions about a variety of environmental issues. Miss Jennifer Woo, a 
graduate student from Simmons College, will work throughout the year with the 
EnviroNet Team as a full-time intern. 

Mr. Blair Cochran was added to the High School science faculty to teach both 
physics and biology classes. 

The chemistry program at the high school has been fortified with the addition 
of Microscale Chemistry laboratory equipment. Microscale labs are designed to 
use the smallest quantities of reagents to promote student safety, student 
understanding of concepts, environmental protection, and cost savings. 

A new 12 station computer lab was added to the high school Science Department. 
The computers are used by science students and faculty for writing, data 
analysis by spreadsheet development, simulation programs, and multimedia 
programs. Future plans call for the addition of microcomputer-based 
laboratory tools to allow students to use the computers for data collection 
and manipulation. 

World Language 

The World Language Department enthusiastically welcomed Miss Karen Aruri to 
the High School staff. This year we are once again able to offer non-honors 
Spanish III and non-honors Spanish IV. The department is hoping to bring back 
Latin. The department is also considering advanced placement language courses 
for seniors . 

All World Language teachers have been actively involved in previewing texts to 
update our books . 

Mrs. Joyce Beckwith began an exchange program with a school in France. In 
February a group of our upper level French students spent two weeks in France 
living with a French family and visiting many famous places. In April we 
welcomed a group of French students who stayed with high school students and 
attended classes with them. 

Miss Judith Nowak and Mrs. Linda Bavuso are reestablishing Wilmington's 
relationship with Nacel in the hopes that many students will either host a 
Spanish student or spend a month in the summer living with a family in Spain. 



-86- 



Mathematics Department 



The 1996-1997 school year started off with the formation of the Wilmington 
Public Schools Math Task Force. All of the high school and middle school 
mathematics teachers are working together to evaluate new texts books and to 
agree upon a direction for the mathematics curriculum based on the state 
frameworks. We enjoy working together and agreeing on common goals. 

The high school mathematics offerings are in the process of being revamped for 
the next school year. We are taking the Department of Education Mathematics 
Frameworks into consideration as well as the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics standards. 

Technology in the classroom is a big part of the frameworks. We have two sets 
of scientific calculators and one set of graphing calculators available for 
use in the classrooms. Also an increasing number of our students have 
purchased their own scientific or graphing calculators as recommended by the 
department. We no longer have an IBM computer lab and the two computer based 
courses (Personal Computer Applications and Computers in Society) have been 
eliminated. The equipment, which is over ten years old, has been passed along 
to the business department. They are using this equipment to replace broken 
parts and to keep their lab operational . 

All of the high school and middle school teachers are involved in course work 
and workshops to keep current with the new standards for teaching mathematics. 

Guidance Department 

The Guidance Information System (GIS) is a computerized source of national 
information about four-year and two-year colleges, graduate and professional 
schools, as well as civilian and armed services occupations and sources of 
financial aid. Freshman and sophomore students were provided an opportunity 
to participate in the computerized Career Decision Making System which assists 
students in making career and educational choices. Junior and seniors were 
provided an opportunity to explore career and college plans. Students 
received a computerized printout of their information and met with their 
individual counselors to review the results. This service was provided to 
students upon individual request or staff referrals. 

The Guidance Department screened a variety of scholarship information and 
contents received during the year from state, national, private and college 
affiliations. Two booklets of scholarship information were prepared for 
student use in the office and library. All appropriate department heads 
received information pertaining to their specific areas. Students were 
informed about scholarships through daily bulletins, newsletters, and during 
the two Financial Aid Workshops. At the December Financial Aid Workshop, 
Carol Rubel, Director of Financial Aid at Wheelock College and Educational 
Loan Officers of Bank of Boston and Fleet Bank provided valuable information 
and assistance in completing the financial aid forms. 

A college information night for college-bound juniors was held in March. The 
meeting provided college-bound juniors and their parents with specific 
directions and information to assist them in the college application process. 

1996 Postgraduate Plans: four-year college/university 70%, two-year 
college/university 12%, less than two-year 2%, career entry 14%, military 1%, 
other 1%. 

School -To -Work Program: 

An exciting new educational initiative entitled School-To-Work has been 
instituted throughout the school system. 

At the elementary level SCANS competencies are being addressed through the 
curriculum . 

Within our middle schools all students take Career Awareness and Exploration 
classes in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade. Partnerships with Marshall's and Analog 
Devices have brought about mentoring opportunities for students. Future 



-87- 



Scientists and Engineers of America is funded by Analog Devices. The goal of 
this project is to encourage all students to develop interest in the sciences 
and engineering as a career focus while working with Analog engineers. 

The high school curriculum is focused on School -To-Work activities as the 
result of a summer curriculum workshop that involved English, social studies, 
science, and business teachers. This past school year, Textron Systems 
Division paired 18 engineers and 25 students to work together designing, 
building, and testing a robot for the U.S. First Robotics Competition. 
Through the Wilmington School/Business Partnership a pilot job shadowing 
experience was offered to seniors. Forty- two students and sixteen companies 
teamed up to make this project an overwhelming success. A two year 
partnership with Winchester Hospital has enabled high school students to work 
with job site mentors through eight to ten week community service projects. 
Additionally, four students are currently serving internships in 
communications through Wilmington's community access television station. The 
students are learning new software applications, working on a Web site 
development project, and working on developing programming for the community 
and high school. Efforts are continuing to develop business partnerships to 
expand career pathways and the associated work based and school based learning 
activities . 

NORTH AND WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 

The North and West Intermediate Schools began the new year with an emphasis 
upon improved student performance. Addressing the curriculum requirements of 
the community, educational reform and preparing for the future important 
goals. Dr. Lore Nielsen, Curriculum Coordinator and Bradford Jackson, 
Director of Administration and Finance join Dr. Geraldine O'Donnell as a team 
committed to working with the middle schools to upgrade curriculum. The math 
curriculum has been the first to benefit. Meeting national standards and 
expanding advanced and inclusionary opportunities at all grade levels, new 
textbooks, manipulatives and the integration of middle and high school staff 
has raised expectations and better defined systemwide goals. Developments in 
language arts will be next followed by the adoption of curriculum frameworks 
statewide in all areas in the months to come. 

Both schools 
have added 
opportunities in 
technology 
education, study 
skills and 
increased staff 
to meet the 
needs of an 
enrollment 
increase of 9.8% 
for the 1996- 
1997 school 
year. As we 
continue to 
grow, we strive 
to maintain an 
atmosphere 
focused and 
responsive to 
our young 
people . 

6th Grade Students from the North Intermediate School. The School 

Councils at both 
schools are an 
integral part of 

our school community. Allocating resources, providing information and working 
on school improvement plans that identify needs, increase awareness, establish 
goals, and provide budget input, their active participation is strengthening 
the role of middle school education in the community. 




-88- 



School improvement plans for both schools seek to provide resources for 
appropriate after school activities, technology opportunities and 
applications, positive school environments, parent/school program 
communications and preparation for high school. 

The School Council, Parent Advisory Council and staff continue to bring 
educational activities and exploratory programs for this most curious and 
exciting age. Efforts at avoiding at-risk behavior can be better served when 
students have alternatives or involvement in school based programs . A sample 
of what the North and West provided the past years is listed: Marshall's 
School Business Partnership, DARE, Take Your Daughter to Work Day, Peer 
Mediation, FSEA-Analog, Project SEED-Northeastern University, Grade 8 
interdisciplinary program on immigration: Ellis Island and Lowell Mills Field 
Trips, Grade 8 Washington, D.C. trip. Science Fair, Memorial Day Program, 
Fifth Grade Parent /Student Orientation, School Opening Orientation, Pride 
Program, Cultural Awareness Day, National Geography Bee, Lowell Sun Spelling 
Bee, Foreign Language Week, Yearbook, Book Fairs, Variety Show, Show Choir, 
Community Food Drive, Adopt -A- Grandmother Program, Student of the Month, 
Honors Assembly, Grade level Newsletters, Grade 8 Farewell Night, Junior 
Achievement, After-School Activities Program, Publication of Student Writing 
Samples, Grade Level Field Trips. 

Lastly, anticipating more students, we continue to explore options for our 
facilities and resources, exploring also professional development, raising 
expectations and maintaining a professional staff committed to our young 
people . 




West Intermediate students at Ellis Island. 



-89- 



SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



The Shawsheen School has been immersed in tremendous growth this past school 
year. Not only are we growing in student population but we are growing in the 
depth of our commitment to our students. This year's theme is "A Year of 
Respect . " For the last several years our parents have responded to our Needs 
Assessment that their greatest concerns for their children lie in the 
development of social values. In an effort to address these needs we have set 
as a goal the teaching of responsible behavior as a priority for the school 
year 1996-97. Every aspect of our program revolves around the teaching of 
respect as a primary concern. 

During the past school year, our parents volunteered to offer a full program 
of computer instruction to all children of the school. Our computer lab was 
staffed entirely by parent volunteers under the direction of faculty member 
Robert Boucher and parent volunteer Mrs. Anne Hassey. Mrs. Martha Mahoney, 
Media Specialist, offered parents a rich opportunity to become involved in the 
school's library and Mrs. Audrey Riddle had a rich resource in parents 
assisting as aides in the school's administrative office. Classroom teachers 
rely heavily on parents helping in the classroom as enrollments soar. 

The strength of the Shawsheen School rests in the support of the Parent 
Advisory Committee. The PAC supports an Enrichment Program that brings 
artists and educators to the children, directly supporting the programs being 
taught in the classroom. The PAC offers to the faculty member the opportunity 
to enrich their program through the generosity of the PAC. 

For the very first time a family picnic was offered by the PAC to the families 
of the Shawsheen School . 

The Harvest Craft Fair held during November is one of the largest in the area. 
Hundreds of parents and children visit our school during this fair to 
participate in the offerings of the PAC. 

A major goal of the Shawsheen School was accomplished this past school year as 
every classroom was fully cabled and outfitted with a color television, cable 
and VCR. Our attention has now been focused on fully wiring the school to 
accommodate computer access to the Internet and the networking of each 
classroom within the building. All programs undertaken in the school are 
accomplished through the combined efforts of parent volunteers and 
participation of parents within the community. 

The specialists at the Shawsheen Elementary School, Michael Donovan (Music), 
Lillian Favreau (Art) , Sue Hendee (Physical Education) , and Martha Mahoney 
(Library/Media) worked with third and fourth grade students in presenting 
their first interdisciplinary production of The Tropical Rain Forest. The 
Rain Forest production in May brought together all of these disciplines in a 
creative, fun and entertaining performance enjoyed by teachers, students and 
parents . 

Ms. Yolanda Girouard, Grade 5 teacher, presented a weekly Shawsheen School 
News program on WCTV. Ms. Girouard' s classroom wrote, produced and videotaped 
a weekly television program that outlined the happenings of the Shawsheen 
School. Children canvassed the building as reporters, collecting news from 
each grade level . 

Third grade students at the Shawsheen School have had the opportunity to go on 
an annual tide pooling field trip for the past ten years. Each year the 
students participate in a month- long unit on tide pool organisms and 
environments. At the conclusion of this unit, all third grade students and 
their Dads are taken on a tide pooling field trip to Odiorne Point State Park 
in Rye, New Hampshire. 

Mrs. Martha Mahoney, Media Specialist, reported that the children of the 
Shawsheen School read over 5,000 books while participating in the Electronic 
Bookshelf Program run by the school's library. This program encourages 
children to select, read, and then be queried on the text via a specialized 
computer program in the library. 



-90- 



We have focused many of our resources on achieving reading literacy by grade 
three this school year. Mrs. Nancy Stouffer and Mrs. Eileen Willey, Reading 
Specialists » are working with three Educational Tutors, Mrs. Roseann Priolo, 
Mrs. Anne Hassey and Mrs. Lynne Martell, in grades one, two and three to 
enhance reading literacy and understanding. These specialists are 
collaborating with the classroom teachers to provide more individual 
instruction to children. It is our goal to make sure that by grade three 
every child is on grade level . 

There are many and varied projects ongoing at the Shawsheen Elementary School. 
We are developing our own "Backyard Nature's Classroom" using the land 
adjacent to the school. A meeting area has been constructed, pathways cleared 
in the woods and an owl's nest placed high in the trees. A mini course is 
being taught at the fourth grade level that focuses on integrating reading, 
math, critical thinking skills, science, computer technology, and research 
skills centered around the theme of "immigration." 

A "Net Day 97" is planned when parent volunteers will wire the school for 
computer networking and we are working to develop our own "home page" for the 
school . 

Children's needs are increasingly being met within the classroom. Fewer 
children are leaving the classroom to receive instruction in "special" 
classes. At each grade level inclusive classrooms make it possible for 
children with special learning needs to have those needs addressed within the 
traditional classroom setting. Teachers working together are better able to 
meet the many needs of children in the classroom providing individual and 
small group instruction at the learner's level. 

A Building Based Support Team has been established to assist teachers in 
meeting the needs of their students. As problems develop within a classroom 
the Building Based Support Team is available to meet with individual teachers 
to discuss specific problems related to how children learn. The "Team" is 
comprised of classroom teachers, the guidance counselor, and a school 
administrator . 

Many challenges face us as we move toward the next millennium. Space is the 
critical problem at the Shawsheen School. It is important for the community 
to work together to provide learning environments that will support excellent 
teachers and young children with a hunger for learning. 

BOUTWELL SCHOOL 

The Boutwell School began its second year of operation as an Early Childhood 
Center when school opened in late August . 

The Wednesday early release day was eliminated this school year, and our 
kindergarten students now attend school on all five days. 

The Extended Day Program continues to be very popular with parents. 

An additional integrated preschool classroom was also added to the school to 
provide an early childhood experience for more students. With this added 
classroom the school increased the capacity to teach thirty more preschool 
students. Every room in the building is now fully utilized. 

To celebrate literacy, several celebrities visited the Boutwell School on 
National Family Literacy Day to read to the students. Some of the people 
included: Senator Kerry's mother and his sister, Peggy; Scott Bailey from the 
Boston Bruins; and Kerry Minior, Representative Miceli's Aide. 

The kindergarten staff worked on completing an informational packet for every 
parent. This booklet is a handy reference for kindergarten parents and 
contains pertinent information, which is easily accessible. 

The kindergarten staff together with teachers from first grade have discussed 
ways to improve the transition from kindergarten to grade one. This 
information sharing and discussion will continue during the next few months. 



-91- 



The kindergarten and preschool teachers organized a Whole Language Study 
Group. Teachers shared ideas and practices, along with discussion of 
philosophies and theories. 

The School Department purchased five (5) Performa computers for the 
kindergarten students. To further the technology available for students, the 
Parent Advisory Council (PAC) donated two (2) Performas for the remaining two 
(2) kindergarten classrooms. In addition, the PAC purchased a printer for 
each classroom. 

WILDWOOD SCHOOL 

During the past year physical improvements have continued at the Wildwood 
School. The windows have been replaced in one section of the upper wing, 
allowing for much improved lighting. New floor tiles have been installed in 
an additional fifth grade classroom. Both tennis courts have been resurfaced 
and additional basketball hoops have been installed. 

Space continues to be an issue at the Wildwood School. The students move from 
three grade three classes to two fourth grade classrooms, making the 
teacher/student ratio problematic. Tutors continue to support both the 
students and teachers at this grade level . Work areas for teachers are at a 
premium with many staff members utilizing closet space for their offices. 

Once again the Wildwood School is offering a reading incentive program for the 
students at all grade levels. The students are enjoying a Pagemaster Theme 
whereby they are rewarded for reading several types of literature. This year 
we are trying to broaden the students' home reading to include selections from 
many different genres. Special books autographed by a visiting author will be 
presented to all students who achieve this goal. 

The school has established a State Assessment Study Group to study this 
important issue and make recommendations to the remainder of the staff and 
school community. 

The Parent Advisory Committee continues to work closely with the staff and 
students at the Wildwood School to support the entire Wildwood community. It 
offers a variety of family events, conducts fund raising activities, and 
volunteers for many jobs throughout the school. In addition, the PAC provides 
the students with several enrichment programs during the school year. Once 
again the PAC has purchased homework organizers to assist the students. 

With the hiring of two additional educational assistants, the students 
continue to be supported in the classroom. In addition to providing academic 
support to students and reading instruction for "at risk" readers, these 
educators are providing quality assistance with the implementation of our 
writing program. 

The Wildwood School Council is once again implementing an ambitious school 
improvement plan which was shaped by responses from parents and staff as well 
as information obtained from surveys. This year's school improvement plan 
recommends the following actions: 



o Conduct a family math night 

o Enhance physical appearances around the school including improved 

paving, planting and playground equipment 

o Purchase Quick Word reference dictionary to assist students with 

their writing 

o Provide staff development opportunities with Quick Word, 

portfolios and the Rinehart Writing Program 

o Continue to study and make recommendations to improve the lunch 

program. 

o Create and distribute new elementary handbook 



-92- 



o Address safety concerns related to the voting at the school 

o Promote love of reading by offering the following activities: 

reading incentive program, book swap, reading "sleep over, " 
visiting author. 




Wildwood School 5th grade class display entries for the build a bridge contest. 



WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

The students and faculty of the Woburn Street School have been actively 
engaged in numerous educational experiences that involve both individual and 
group oriented projects and other special and noteworthy events this past 
academic year. 

A major focus of the Woburn Street School has been to continue to expand our 
technological resources and to develop interdisciplinary curriculum units that 
will incorporate the use of technology on a daily basis. Due to this 
initiative, we were selected to be one of the EnviroNet pilot sites throughout 
New England. 

The EnviroNet Project is a two year program, sponsored by the National Science 
Foundation and Simmons College, that encourages a community approach to 
environmental science education using on-line telecommunications. Students 
participate in one of the many environmental monitoring projects such as Acid 
Rain, Birdwatch, and BatNet . They collect specific data for these studies and 
send their results to the EnviroNet network. The students then analyze and 
compare their data with other schools involved in the program. The students 
also learn on-line researching skills by searching for information that will 
support or enhance their data, and by developing science pen pals at the other 
sites . 

The Woburn Street School is just in the beginning stages of this exciting 
pilot project. We have begun to involve local community agencies such as the 
Conservation Committee and the Ipswich Water Shed Project to join in our 
effort to incorporate this project throughout the entire Wilmington Public 
School system. 

This past summer, Principal Kate Conway, art specialist Karen Larrabee, and 
librarian Barbara Beaucher were among the 168 teachers and administrators 
selected from across the country to participate in the 1996 Teacher Institute 



-93- 



on French impressionist and post- impressionist art at the National Gallery of 
Art in Washington, D.C. This institute provided the team an opportunity to 
develop interdisciplinary learning experiences for the Woburn Street students 
that will become a source of excitement, creativity and inspiration in the 
classroom. 

The Woburn Street School is developing their own art gallery by collecting 
various pieces of art which will be displayed in the cafeteria/gallery 
scheduled for a grand opening the spring of 1997. Long range plans for this 
program include expanding the gallery with works from other artists and 
incorporating visits to the Museum of Fine Arts and other local galleries and 
museums . 

Our school continues to sponsor schoolwide educational opportunities for 
parents to visit, explore and join in the fun of being a Woburn Street 
student. Some of these events were Young Author's/Technology Night, Science 
Fair, Social Studies Fair, Creating Inventions Evening, Field Day, and the 
Read-A-Thon. 

First Grade: Weather 
person, Mishelle Michaels 
from Channel 7 visited the 
children to present a 
special program on weather. 
Another exciting event that 
took place in the first 
grade was the puppet 
project. Children designed 
their puppets, wrote riddles 
and stories about their new 
creations, and performed 
mini puppet shows . 

Second Grade: The second 
grade students at the Woburn 
Street School continued to 
expand on the STC Science 
program. The children 
visited the Butterfly Place 
in Westford as a culminating 
activity to the Life Science 
Butterfly unit. We 
continued to integrate all 
curriculum areas through our 
reading program. An ongoing 
strand includes the study of 
Native Americans and Early 
American life. 

Third Grade: The students 
learned about plants, 
chemicals and skeletons 
(both human and animal) . 
Students were visited by a 
scientist and were provided 
with a hands-on, 
interactive, in-school field 
trip. Owl pellets were 
explored and live owls 
observed with a visit from 
Wilmington based Wingmasters 

Fourth Grade: The fourth grade students worked on a variety of projects 
including Egypt when they visited the Museum of Fine Arts to view the Egyptian 
Mummy exhibit . 

Miss Feeney' s class entertained us all with their performance of "A Christmas 
Carol" by Charles Dickens before the school vacation. This annual 
presentation served as a great introduction to the classics in literature. 

-94- 




Miss Gamble's and Mrs. Timmins' classes combined their social studies lessons 
with their newly acquired knowledge of electricity. In social studies the 
children in fourth grade learn about the different regions of the United 
States of America. In science they learn what makes a complete circuit. To 
integrate both subjects the children made circuit boards of the states and 
capitals. They then invited some classes in to take the "Capital Challenge." 

Fifth Grade: The fifth graders at the Woburn Street School studied about 
endangered animals. They adopted a manatee named "Howie" and have joined 
others who are fighting to keep the manatee from passing into extinction. 

The students also collaborated on a unit about ecosystems. Animals, plants 
and pollutants were observed in aquariums and terrariums over a period of many 
weeks. This unit helped students understand the web of relationships that 
link plants and animals to each other, and to their natural environment. 

Reading: The reading specialists at the Woburn Street School functioned as 
inclusionary teachers in grades 1-5. They worked within the classrooms 
providing supportive reading services to children in small groups and with the 
whole class in a cooperative manner with the classroom teacher. They also 
functioned as consultants with the classroom teacher by planning and sharing 
ideas and materials for the integration of language arts throughout all 
curriculum areas. 

Special events and activities that encouraged the development of literacy were 
the Children's Book Week Celebration, the reading incentive program, "Be A 
Champion", Young Authors' Night, participation in the Greater Boston Young 
Authors' Conference at Pine Manor College, the Grade 5 Annual Spelling Bee 
whose champion was sent to participate in the UMass Lowell district bee, and 
the Junior Great Books Program. 

PERFORMING AND FINE ARTS 

During this past year, the Performing and Fine Arts Department expanded its 
services to the students of Wilmington by reintroducing an art teacher at the 
kindergarten level. We once again provided a foundation in art and music 
techniques, historical analysis and aesthetic perception at all grade levels. 
High School students were able to choose from various art, photography, 
ceramics, band, strings and chorus classes. Through student performances and 
art displays, the community was able to enjoy the students' efforts and 
witness their pride in their art work and musical development throughout the 
year . 

The Fine Arts Department is currently revising their curriculum so it will be 
in accord with the National Standards and State Frameworks. The staff 
attended a workshop in November on Curriculum Development and has continued to 
meet regularly. Elementary school students again participated in and won 
awards in the Reading Municipal Light Contest which stresses awareness of the 
benefits and dangers of electricity. High School students once again 
participated in the Scholastic Art Awards. Laura Winn was awarded a Gold Key, 
and Elizabeth Berlik and Jenn Carr received Silver Keys. 

The Performing and Fine Arts Department has continued to reach out to the 
Wilmington community. High School art students again participated in the 
Chamber of Commerce's Business to Business Expo. There was a systemwide art 
show at the Town Library in March, commemorating Youth Art Month. Portfolio 
class students have continued their outreach program at Wilmington Woods 
Senior Residence. Video classes meet three to four times a week at the Cable 
WCTV studios. A group of dedicated high school students designed and painted 
a mural on the wall at the Wilmington Youth Center. Last April, high school 
and middle school Strings Attached members traveled to Holmfirth, England to 
perform in the second half of the "British-American Project." Our High School 
Band represented Wilmington in parades in Woburn, Billerica, and Methuen, and 
in December, the band proudly marched in Disney World's Main Street Parade as 
a part of Disney's Twenty Fifth Anniversary Magic Music Days. 



-95- 



The tireless fundraising efforts of Wilmington Band Parents and Friends have 
resulted in the acquisition of much needed equipment and other financial 
assistance. Band parents are currently finishing one hundred uniform vests 
for the Elementary School Bands. The Strings Attached Parents are currently 
beginning fundraising efforts for a possible trip to Italy in 1998. 

Art students have contributed to the musical holiday concerts by providing 
visual decorations and the final band, chorus and string concerts at the high 
school bring together all levels of student work around the High school gym. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12) as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. 

The health program in grades K-5, under the direction of Mrs. Laura Stinson, 
has incorporated "Project Charlie" into the curriculum. In grade 5 we offer 
the DARE program, in cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and 
Officer Chip Bruce. These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol 
education through the teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision- 
making . 

The Physical Education Department cited several students for outstanding 
achievement in physical education: 



1996 Ryan Rappoli and Amanda Zaya 

1997 Paul Heffernan and Lisa Chin 

1998 Paul Tentindo and Cheryl Lee 

1999 John Shirley and Emily King 



Athletic Awards 1995-1996: 

Dr. Gerald Pagan Award - "To the Most Outstanding Wilmington High School 
Senior Athlete" - Leanne Harris and Greg Young 

Lawrence H. Gushing Award - "To the Senior Athlete Demonstrating both 
Scholarship and Sportsmanship and Athletic Ability" - Jacqueline Harrison and 
Daniel King 

Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Award - "To a Senior Three Sport Athlete who Demonstrates 
Courage, Discipline and Tenacity" - Leanne Harris and Douglas Olender 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award - "To a Senior with the Most Dedication to 
Sports" - Douglas Olender and Nicole Dussault 

Wildcat Distinguished Service Award - "For Contribution and Service to W.H.S. 
Athletics" - Sally Radomski, Boosters President 1985-1996 

Alumni Award - Recognizes a former outstanding student athlete who has gone on 
and continued to demonstrate their commitment to excellence: John Lynch 
(Class of 1992) 



"Top Ten" Award: 

Rank 1 Daniel King (Villanova) 

2 Kristen Roache (Northeastern) 

5 Charles Ross (Northeastern) 

6 Joan DeMarco (Boston College) 

8 Sophia Martinos (Clark University) 

10 David Bennett (U.S. Air Force Academy) 



Cape Ann League All Conference Awards 
Julie Gillis - Field Hockey 
William Harrison - Football 
Richard Gillis - Football 
Sean Kerrigan - Football 
Matt Haskamp - Football 
Mike O' Toole - Football 
Greg Young - Spring Track 
Steve Marchillo - Spring Track 



Lisa Southmayd - Basketball, Softball 
Doug Olender - 
Dennis Torpey 
Ryan Haubner - 
Dan Abbott - Ice Hockey 
Laura Winn - Winter Track 
Kevin Kacamburas - Spring Track 
Jeremy Rufo - Spring Track 



- Basketball, 
Basketball 
- Ice Hockey 
Ice Hockey 



-96- 



The 1996 girls and boys basketball teams coached by Beth Kapnis and Jim 
McCune, qualified for the State Tournament. The 1996 ice hockey team coached 
by Steve Scanlon won the Division I League Championship. The 1996 boys 4x400 
relay team coached by Bob Cripps were State Class D Champions . Greg Young set 
the MVC record in the 600 yard dash. He was voted to the MVC All Scholastic 
Team. In spring track, 4x44 relay team of Jeremy Rufo, Kevin Kacamburas, 
Greg Young and Steve Marchillo were again State Class D Champions. Greg Young 
won the State Class D in the 800 yard event as well as being named MVC All 
Conference and the Lowell Sun All Star Team. The 1996 Softball team coached 
by Paul Lyman won the Division I League Championship. The 1996 girls field 
hockey team coached by Maureen Noone qualified for the State Tournament. The 
boys soccer team coached by Richard Scanlon qualified for the State 
Tournament. The girls soccer team coached by Sue Hendee qualified for the 
State Tournament. Head Football Coach Robert Almeida was named "Coach of the 
Year. " 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE 

Wilmington School Food Service employs 14 full time staff members and 15 part 
time. We are a self-supporting department within the School Department. All 
salaries, including the Director's and Secretary's, food purchases, equipment 
and most maintenance as well as office supplies are paid from student lunch 
participation, reimbursement from Department of Education, catering functions 
such as National Honor Society Banquets, luncheons, coffee hours, Senior 
Citizen Lunch Program, Extended Day Care Program and any other programs that 
allow us to cater and put these monies back into the program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture food based menus. 
We are working to upgrade our computer system to provide up-to-date nutrient 
analysis of all menus. 

We offer students many lunch choices to encourage participation at the 
reasonable price of $1.25. We served 283,134 student meals and 15,885 Senior 
Citizen meals this year. We are encouraging breakfast service at the High 
School . We have conducted several pilot programs to bring new ideas and 
products into school food service. 

We once again participated in Framingham State College's graduate Intern 
Program. A student intern studied under Wilmington's School Food Service 
Program. We were able to survey one of the schools and bring in equipment to 
better service the students . 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 16 5 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 575 special needs students ages 
3-22 . 

The Special Education Department, and the high school administration, 
collaborated in the planning, development and implementation of an alternative 
high school program for students unable to have their special education needs 
met within a traditional high school setting. In addition to the 
instructional component, the program also offers group and individual 
counseling services, outward bound activities, and a vocational training 
component. The Town Manager has agreed to work with the program in finding 
appropriate community based job training opportunities for students. With the 
development of this additional program the Special Education Department was 
able to transition five students, previously placed in private out-of -district 
placements, back to Wilmington with a corresponding savings in out-of -district 
tuition and transportation costs. Additionally, students, for whom out-of - 
district placement may have been a necessity, are being served by this program 
thus avoiding additional out-of -district transportation and tuition costs for 
the town. 

The Special Education Department also reallocated and reorganized three 
special education classes in such a way that allowed the School Department to 
return eighteen Wilmington special needs students who were being educated in 
other SEEM Collaborative communities, back to Wilmington. This allowed the 



-97- 



School Department to more appropriately serve the students in the least 
restrictive program nearest their home while at the same time reducing our 
collaborative tuition costs and corresponding transportation costs. 

The sum effort of both these programs initiatives has been to expand the 
capacity of the School Department to service students in the least restrictive 
environment and in a more cost effective way. 

PERSONNEL 

The following people retired from the Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Mr. Lawrence DeGeorge, Guidance Counselor at the North Intermediate 
School; Mr. Leonard Gagnon, Computer Lab Teacher at the Wildwood School; Mrs. 
Suzanne Gagnon, Mathematics Teacher at the North Intermediate School; Miss 
Tirzah Krey, Science Teacher at the North Intermediate School; Mr. Frank 
Lentine, Guidance Counselor at the Wildwood School; Miss Marjorie Quinlan, 
Elementary Teacher at the Shawsheen School; Mrs. Lillian Thuline, English 
Teacher at the North Intermediate School; and Mr. Robert Hamilton, English 
Teacher at Wilmington High School. The Wilmington school community wishes to 
thank these people for their many years of dedicated service to the children 
of Wilmington and wish them many happy and healthful retirement years. 

In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, parents, and students who 
contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the 1995- 
1996 school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system in 1996. 

Shawsheen Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District 

School Committee Representatives 

Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee are: Mark Trifiro 
and Peter Russo from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman, and Bernard F. 
Hoar, Treasurer from Billerica; John P. Miller, Chairman, and Alfred Verrier 
from Burlington; J. Peter Downing and Patricia W. Meuse from Tewksbury; and 
James M. Gillis, Secretary, and Robert G. Peterson from Wilmington. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School is one of twenty- six regional 
vocational school districts located in Massachusetts. Its primary purpose is 
to provide students with a high school education and ensure students receive 
technical training to enter the work force immediately after high school 
graduation. Two hundred and sixteen students graduated in 1996 and ninety- 
five percent of these graduates either entered college or were gainfully 
employed as experienced technicians or craftsmen. The school provides 
technical training in twenty occupations with those programs monitored by two 
hundred and fifty local businesspersons to ensure relevancy and oversight. 
Residents of the district may visit the school by making an appointment with 
the Guidance Department or visit the school' s WEB site at 
www . shawsheen . tec . ma . us . 

There were a number of highlights in 1996 that deserve special comment. 
1. Accreditation 

In early 1996 Shawsheen faculty completed an intensive self study in 
preparation for the decennial on-site visit by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, the accreditation agency for local high schools. 

In October twenty- three educators from schools throughout New England 
conducted an on-site visit. In November the chairperson of the visiting team 
presented the final report to the Commission for positive approval at its 
biannual Board meeting. Shawsheen Valley Technical received full 
accreditation status from the Commission on Vocational Technical Education. 




Among highlights of the visiting team report, the following were noted: 

a. Shawsheen enjoys the services of a highly dedicated and professional 
faculty and administrative staff who bring a great deal of care and 
expertise to their students. 

b. The school should be commended for an excellent placement rate for its 
graduates . 

c. The Commission noted with satisfaction the seriousness with which 
the school's administration and staff take the school's 
relationship with the Commission. The self-study which preceeded 
the site visit was very well done. 

d. The Commission further notes that the school is very well managed and 
makes good use of its limited funds. 

e. The facility is well maintained and in good condition. 

f . A marked achievement of the school is the large number of students at 
work sites through the co-op program. The high standards required in 
both shop and academic areas to be eligible for the program, not only 
acts as an incentive for seniors to achieve, but also assures the 
employer a committed, serious, and capable student worker. 

g. The innovations in the school are marked by the increased number of 
computers available at the school for both students and staff. The 
modern, up-to-date equipment and texts in almost every department 
exemplify the school' s commitment to maintaining its pace with industry 
advances. Of special note, is the newly established web site which was 
developed and is maintained by students. The site contains a number of 
pages which have information from sports to school promotions on them. 

h. As part of the administration' s five-year plan to advance the equipment 
and educational programs of the school, the faculty and administration 
embarked on an extensive project to rewrite all curricular areas of the 
school. The process, which is in various stages of development, uses 
the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Common Core of Learning 
as its basis. The faculty has demonstrated their commitment to their 
students and the school by the investment of their time and expertise in 
this challenging project. 

i. A School Council was established and has developed a School Improvement 
Plan. Members are working in a most positive direction, and as a 
result, Shawsheen Valley Regional Technical High School is making great 
strides toward the future. 



The Visiting Committee commended the School Committee that is 
to meeting the needs of the school district." 



devoted 



The Visiting Committee also listed many other commendations which it 
identified and to which the Commission referred during its deliberations. 
Recommendations included the need to upgrade science laboratories. In 
December the administration presented a plan to the School Committee to ensure 
all accepted recommendations of the Commission will be implemented during the 
next two years . 

2. Community Projects 

Various community projects were completed during 1996 that deserve special 
note : 

a. The masonry students constructed the base to the Welcome to Burlington 
sign located on the Burlington Town Common. In addition, cement and 
masonry repairs were made on the Manning Park wading pool in Billerica 
so that the pool could be enjoyed by residents during the summer season. 

b. Winchester Hospital and the Town of Wilmington requested and received 
assistance from the electrical, carpentry, plumbing, heating. 



99- 



ventilation and air conditioning students to make repairs and 
modifications to a building located at 10 Church Street in Wilmington 
Center. This building will be used by the Wilmington Community 
Roundtable Foimdation, Inc. 

c. Shawsheen students and teachers participated in the Wilmington Expo 96 
sponsored by the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce. The Culinary Arts 
Department put on cooking, baking, and cake decorating demonstrations 
while the Cosmetology Department demonstrated the latest fashion 
techniques, makeup, facials, and offered manicures to the public. 

d. Shawsheen staff and students once again participated in the Town of 
Billerica "Yankee Doodle" celebration. 

e. The plumbing department installed and revamped piping and plumbing at 
the Pinehurst Fire Station in Billerica. Improvements made will 
facilitate the filling of the pumper for the fire trucks. 

f . The carpentry department constructed beautiful sitting benches at the 
Hajjar Elementary School in Billerica. These benches will be used by 
students participating in physical education classes at the Hajjar 
Elementary School . 

g. Shawsheen formed a district -wide Technology Committee comprised of 
representatives from member town school and municipal staff to 
coordinate and facilitate technology planning and training. Police, 
firefighters, town employees, and/or school employees from Bedford, 
Billerica, Tewksbury, and Wilmington received all -day training on 
Windows 95 and other computer applications at Shawsheen Valley 
Technical . 

3 . Athletics 

Four hundred and ninety Shawsheen Valley Technical students participated in 
interscholastic athletics. Commonwealth Athletic Conference Championships were 
captured in cross country, ice hockey, girls basketball, and baseball. The 
wrestling team won the state wrestling vocational championship. The girls 
swim team won the league swim meet title, and the girls volleyball team, 
soccer team, girls basketball team, baseball team, ice hockey team, and the 
Softball team all qualified for state tournament play. The football cheering 
squad placed second in league competition. 

Conclusion 

The aforementioned is a small example of the highlights of 1996 at Shawsheen 
Valley Technical High School. The school is a free public high school 
available to students from five member communities. The school's success is 
directly attributable to the support received from parents, taxpayers, and 
community leaders from the member municipalities. The School Committee 
gratefully appreciates the support received from local Town Administrators, 
Finance Committees, and Town Meeting Members. 

Eleven hundred and ninety eight full-time students were enrolled at Shawsheen 
in 1996, while another seven hundred part-time students took advantage of 
adult training opportunities. The school is dedicated to ensuring that local 
businesspersons continually receive student graduates well equipped to be 
successful in chosen careers and occupations. 



-100- 



WARRANT PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - 



MARCH 5, 1996 



WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections 
to vote at Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 1, 2 & 5) and Wildwood School 
(Precincts 3, 4, & 6) on Tuesday, the fifth day of March, 1996 from 7:00 a.m. 
to 8:00 p.m., for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes for the Primary Officers for the election of candidates of 
political parties for the following offices: Presidential Preference, 
District Members of State Committee (one man and one woman) for each 
Political Party for the First Essex and Middlesex Senatorial District, Members 
of the Democratic Town Committee, Members of the Republican Town Committee, 
Members of the Libertarian Town Committee. 

The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the 
Town Hall and the Wildwood School by Assistant Town Clerk, Carolyn M. Kenney 
and all machines were ready with zero sheets. 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Presidential Preference 

Bill Clinton 

Lyndon H . LaRouche , Jr . 

No Preference 

Blanks 

Others 

Total 

State Committee Man 
Jay J . Donovan 
Stephen K. Walker 
Blanks 
Total 

State Committee Woman 



Carolyn J, 

Blanks 

Total 



Johnson 



407 
16 
55 
16 

2 

496 



343 
29 
124 
496 



270 
226 
496 



Presidential Preference 

Richard G. Lugar 17 

Morry Taylor 4 

Phi 11 Gramm 2 

Patrick Buchanan 3 82 

Bob Dole 43 9 

Steve Forbes 146 

LaMar Alexander 91 

Alan Keyes 24 

Robert K. Dornan 1 

No Preference 11 

Blanks 1 

Others 4 

Total 1122 

State Committee Man 

Dale C. Jenkins, Jr. 471 

E. Carl Dasch 207 

Blanks 444 

Total 1122 



Town Committee 

James R. Miceli 291 

Anna M. Visconti 179 

Patricia F. Duggan 156 

Susan P. Donovan 144 

Jay J. Donovan 17 

Mary Emerick 105 

George W. Hooper 124 

Nancy J. Steen 14 9 

James F. Banda 185 

Judson W. Miller 125 

Gerald O'Reilly 148 

Simon Cutter 127 

Daniel Wandell 140 

Daniel C. Wandell 129 

Brian J. Gillis 122 

Gerald R. Duggan 150 

Brian J. MacDonald 108 

Charles Rooney, Jr. 137 

Daniel O'Keefe 111 

Kim E. McDonough 115 

Thomas Barrett 107 

Aldo A. Caira 172 

Robert J. Cain 177 

Michael V. McCoy 164 

Alice M. Hooper 130 



Town Committee 
Edwin P. Tripp, III 
Charles L. Bowlby 
John Michael Walsh 
Earl Hupper 
Teri L. Bakewell 
William G. Hooper, Jr, 
Ruth M. Kitchener 
Stephen E. Phillips 
Daryll D. Tripp 
Maureen E. Kuhn 
Eleanor M. Martin 
Al Meegan 
Joseph E. 
Robert C. 
Marc J. DiJulia 
Michael R. Moss 
Judith M. DelNinno 
Anthony D. Pini 
Catherine G. Mitrano 
Andrew C. Burns 
James E. Mahoney 
Stephen McCarron 

Members Elected (22) 



Long 

DiPasquale 



311 
291 
318 
331 
281 
377 
365 
303 
287 
322 
314 
381 
283 
405 
287 
276 
310 
291 
312 
281 
333 
303 



Members Elected (25) 



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Libertarian Party 



Presidential Preference 



Harry Browne 4 

Rick Tompkins 1 

Irwin Schiff 

No Preference 1 

Total 6 



State Committee Man 
No Candidates 

State Committee Woman 
No Candidates 

Town Committee 
No Candidates 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. Total vote was Democratics 496, 
Republicans 1,122 and Libertarians 6. This was 13% of the registered voters. 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 20. 1996 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO; 



CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON; 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner 
prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs to meet and 
assemble at the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 1, 2 and 5) , and the Wildwood 
School (Precincts 3, 4 and 6), N.B., Saturday the twentieth day of April, A.D. 
1996 at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and 
shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of Town Officers: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices, to wit: Two Selectmen for the terms of Three Years; 
Two Members of the School Committee for the terms of Three Years; One Member 
of the Housing Authority for the term of Five Years; One Member of the 
Redevelopment Authority for the term of Five Years . 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections 
and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in the Town Meeting 
at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the Twenty- Seventh day of April, A.D. 1996 at 10:30 a.m., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was called by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall and the Assistant Town Clerk, 
Carolyn M. Kenney at the Wildwood School, and the warrant as above was read. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could examine them before the polls were opened. The checkers were 
prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and everything 
was in readiness at 10:00 A.M. and the Town Clerk declared the polls open. 

The results were as follows: 



SELECTMEN for three years (vote for two) 



Voted 



Diane M. Allan 



Michael V 



James E. 
Michael 
Blanks 
Total 



McCoy 

Mahoney 
J. Newhouse 



7 Stonehedge Dr. (Candidate 

for Re-election) 
11 Treasure Hill Rd. (Candidate for 

Re-election) 
13 Gloria Way 
5 Broad Street 



1, 320 



1, 470 
1, 260 
1, 805 
989 
3 , 422 



■102- 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Robert W. Young 640 Woburn Street (Cand.for Re-election) 2,230 

Barbara K. Breakey 63 Middlesex Avenue 1,867 

Nora Zinan 6 Revere Avenue 651 

Blanks 2 , 096 

Total 3,422 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) Voted 

Melvin F. Keough 11 Magazine Road 2,263 

Blanks 1 . 159 

Total 3,422 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) Voted 

Charles N. Gilbert 13 Church Street 1,657 

Mark D. Nelson 78 Swain Road 1,123 

Blanks 642 

Total 3,422 



The results of the election were ready about 10:00 p.m. and all the elected 
officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town 
Clerk shortly thereafter. The total number of votes cast was 3,422 which 
included 217 absentee ballots. The total number of registered voters is 
12,332 of which 28% voted in this town election. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 27, 1996 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 10:40 a.m. (164) James Stewart, the Moderator opened 
the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. He then read the names 
of departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year and a moment of silence was observed. He then introduced 
our newly elected and re-elected town officials and thanked former Selectman 
Diane Allan, and former School Committee member, James Demos for their fine 
public service. The Moderator informed the meeting that he would take up 
Articles 1-12 in order and then radom selection would begin and also that the 
meeting would take a ten minute break at 2:00 p.m. 

The Moderator then started to read the warrant and was interrupted by 
Selectman James Rooney, "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2: To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Michael 
Caira, "I move that the town pass over this article." Motion seconded and so 
voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything 
in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1996, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1996, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable within 



-103- 



one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
17. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George W. Hooper of the Finance Committee, "I move that the 
several and respective sums as recommended and presented by the Finance 
Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article 5, each department's 
budget to be taken up and voted on in the order they appear, subject to 
amendment, and each department's budget not open for reconsideration 
until the entire budget is voted." Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 1,920 

Expenses 11.4 50 

Total 13,370 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries (p.t.) 18,721 

Expenses 4,309 

Total 23,030 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,650 

Expenses 4,550 

Total 6,200 

Finance Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 1,200 

Expenses 6,350 

Total 7,550 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 81,161 

Other Salaries 220,314 

Expenses 4 7,415 

Furnishings & Equipment 600 

Total 349,490 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 59,735 

Other Salaries 102,829 

Expenses 2,010 

Total 164,574 



Treasurer /Col lector 

Salary - Finance Director 59,303 

Other Salaries 97,089 

Expenses 30,100 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

Total 186,492 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 4 9,551 

Other Salaries 43,875 

Expenses 2,180 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 95,606 



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Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 62,648 

Other Salaries 62,989 

Expenses 41,500 

Appraisals & Inventories 25,000 

ATB Costs 10, 000 

Furnishings & Equipment 525 

Total 202,662 

Town Counsel 

Personal Services & Expenses 67 . 500 

Permanent Building Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 1,200 

Expenses 100 

Total 1,300 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1,117,774 

PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salary - Chief 77,230 

Salary - Deputy Chief 61,308 

Salary - Lieutenant 109,332 

Salary - Sergeants 278,936 

Salary - Patrolmen 1,145,088 

Salary - Dispatchers* 17,754 

Salary - Clerks 57,614 

Salary - Fill-In Costs 234,024 

Salary - Paid Holidays 71,758 

Salary - Specialist 10,700 

Salary - Night Diff. 32,760 

Salary - Incentive Pay 37,800 

Sick Leave Buyback 11,514 

Expenses 143,227 

Furnishings & Equipment 1,100 

Total 2,2 90,14 5 

♦Includes one patrolman and three dispatchers funded 75% from Federal Gran 

Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 68,143 

Salary - Deputy Chief 56,769 

Salary - Lieutenants 233,180 

Salary - Privates 1,015,959 

Salary - Dispatch Clerks 58,597 

Overtime Costs 162,500 

Paid Holidays 72,614 

EMT & Incentive Pay 73,4 50 

Fire Alarm Salary 11,280 

Sick Leave Buyback 2 0,4 94 

Expenses 62,550 

Furnishings & Equipment 22 , 000 

Total 1,857,536 

Animal Control 

Salaries 22,832 

Expenses 6,600 

Total 29,432 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 4 , 177 , 113 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Personnel Services 

DPW - Superintendent 77,230 

Engineers -Full Time 118,231 

Engineer-Part Time 37,842 

Highway - Full Time 863,567 

Highway - Part Time 16,800 



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stream Maint. - Part Time 15,2 00 

Tree - Full Time 83,161 

Tree - Overtime 5,325 

Parks/Grounds - Full Time 132,496 

Parks /Grounds - Part Time 

Parks/Grounds - Overtime 13,350 

Cemetery-Full Time 106,951 

Cemetery- Part Time 

Cemetery-Overtime 7,073 

Snow & Ice-Ex. Help/0. T. 127, 411 

Total 1,604,637 

Contractual Services 

Engineer 900 

Highway 26,4 90 

Highway-Repair Town Vehicles 70,450 

Tree 3,000 

Parks /Grounds 3,400 

Cemetery 4,100 

Road Machinery-Repair 65,000 

Public Street Lights 206,944 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 1,336,605 

Snow Sc Ice-Repair 16,245 

Snow & Ice-Misc. Services 75,000 

Total 1,808,134 

Materials & Supplies 

Engineer 1,600 

Highway-Expenses 31,500 

Highway- Const . Supplies & Road Improvements 27,500 

Highway-Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 51,885 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 47,065 

Stream Maintenance - Expenses 2,800 

Tree 6,395 

Parks /Grounds 27,000 

Cemetery 10,650 

Chapter 81 - Maintenance 70,000 

Drainage Projects-Expenses 20,000 

Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 94,091 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 4,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 30 , 500 

Total 394,486 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 3.837.757 

Motion by George Hooper, "I move that the sum of $3,837,757 be 
appropriated for the Department of Public Works; the sum of $35,000 to 
be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery Lots Account and the sum 
of $15 . OOP to be raised by transfer from the Interest Cemetery Trust 
Funds and that both amounts be applied to line item Personnel Services 
Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of $3.787,757 be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 52,323 

Other Salaries (inc. p/t) 109,473 

Expenses 6,750 

Mental Health 16,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 135 

Total 184,681 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries (p.t.) 3,960 

Expenses 80 

Total 4,040 



-106- 



Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 54,911 

Other Salaries (incl. p/t) 89,836 

Expenses 11,025 

Total 155,772 

Building Insp./Bd. of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 42,193 

Other Salaries (incl. p/t) 62,842 

Expenses 5,788 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 110,823 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 455 , 316 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Maintenance & Operation 

Salary - Superintendent 70,110 

Other Salaries 1,333,181 

Overtime 26,700 

Heating Fuel 204,124 

Electricity 88,764 

Utilities 62,196 

Expenses 240 , 110 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 2,025,185 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 5,700 

Expenses 1,625 

Assistance - Veterans 13 , 000 

Total 20,325 

Library 

Salary - Director 40,990 

Other Salaries (incl. p/t) 271,953 

M.V.L.C. 24,026 

Expenses 56,588 

Furnishings & Equipment 1,234 

Total 394,791 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 55,655 

Other Salaries (p/t) 35,915 

Expenses 2,700 

Total 94,270 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 44,353 

Other Salaries (incl. p/t) 42,585 

Expenses 34,208 

Total 121,146 

Historical Commission 

Salaries (p.t.) 900 

Expenses 900 

Total 1,800 

Commission on Disabilities 

Salaries (p.t.) 500 

Expenses 250 

Total 750 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 633 , 082 



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SCHOOLS 



Wilmington School Department 15,479,151 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 1,670,315 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 17. 149. 466 

MATURING DEBT Se INTEREST 

Schools 199,794 

General Government 369,772 

Sewer 3 03,83 7 

Water 905 , 962 

Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the sum of $1,799.365 be 
apppropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest and that the sum of 
$905 , 962 be transferred from Water Department - Available Funds and 
applied to Maturing Debt & Interest - Water Account and the sum of 
$1 , 748 be transferred from Water Department - Available Funds and 
applied to Interest on Anticipation Notes and Authentication Fees and 
Miscellaneous Debt and that the remaining balance of $891,655 be 
raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

Interest On Anticipation Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Misc. Debt 20,000 

TOTAL MATtTRING DEBT & INTEREST 1. 799. 365 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance 475,500 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 2,022,000 

Veteran's Retirement 20,196 

Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 3 5,82 

Medicare Employer Contribution 132,000 

Salary Adjustment & Additional Costs 65,000 

Local Trans . /Training Conferences 6,300 

Out-of-state Travel 1,000 

Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 60,848 

Microfilm Projects 1,000 

Annual Audit 13,900 

Ambulance Billing 12,000 

Tovm Report 6,2 50 

Deferred Teachers Salaries 106,527 

School Medicaid Billing 30,000 

Sewer Maintenance & Operations 67,217 

Professional & Technical Services 20,000 

Reserve Fund 100,000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 3 . 175. 558 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$3, 175, 558 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve and that the 
sum of $68,243 be transferred from Water Department - Available Funds 
and applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance Account and the 
sum of $161 , 024 be transferred from Water Department - Available Funds 
and applied to Unclassified and Reserve - Emp.loyee Health and Life 
Insurance Account and the sum of $10,649 be transferred from Water 
Department Available Funds and applied to Unclassified and Reserve - 
Medicare Employers' Contribution Account and that the remaining 
balance of $2,935, 642 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so 
voted . 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 17 , 221 , 150 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including but 
not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or turn 
in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof : 



-108- 



(a) Police Department 

Replacement of four police cruisers. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 88 , 364 for the purchase of four (4) 
replacement police cruisers for the Police Department, and further to 
authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicles." The 
Finance Committee recommends approval of four cruisers. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $ 88,364 . 

(b) Fire Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement fire engine pumper. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the tovm vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 180 , OOP for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement Fire Engine Pumper for the Fire Department, and further to 
authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced equipment." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Dick Duggan, of the Finance 
Committee questioned need for this pumper. Fire Chief Stewart replied 
that based on DPW Mechanics and other outside agencies, the pumper 
cannot be repaired to meet the needs of the community. It is over 
twenty years old. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 180,000 . 

(c) Fire Department 

Purchase of replacement Fire Chief's Vehicle. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 22,361 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement Fire Chief's vehicle for the Fire Department, and further to 
authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicle." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 22, 361 . 

(d) Department of Public Works 

Purchase of one (1) replacement pick-up truck. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 21 , 052 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement pick-up truck for the Department of Public Works, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicle." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, $ 21 , 052 . 

(e) Department of Public Works 

Purchase of one (1) ton dump truck to replace one pick-up truck. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 30 , 771 for the purchase of one (1) 
ton dump truck to replace a pick-up truck for the Department of Public 
Works, and further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said 
replaced vehicle." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $ 30 , 771 . 

(f ) Public Buildings Department 

Purchase of two (2) replacement pick-up trucks. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 26 , 536 for the purchase of two (2) 
replacement pick-up trucks for the Public Buildings Department, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, $ 26 . 536 . 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the renovation of the tennis and basketball courts at the Boutwell 
and Wildwood Schools and further to determine how the same shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



-109- 



Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 28 , OOP for the renovation of the 
tennis and basketball courts at the Boutwell and Wildwood Schools." 
Finance Commitee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 28. OOP . 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the tovm will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the installation of an irrigation sprinkler system for two 
ballfields at the Woburn Street School and further to determine how the same 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination 
thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 1P , PPP for the installation of an 
irrigation sprinkler system for two ballfields at the Woburn Street 
School." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $ 1P . PPP . 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace a section of roof at the West Schoolhouse and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 11 , PPP to replace a section of roof 
at the West Schoolhouse." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, $ 11 , PPP . 

ARTICLE IP. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of upgrading town facilities as identified in the town's 
Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan on file in the office of the 
Town Manager, such upgrades to include replacement of the existing doors and 
installation of an automatic door opening system at the Wilmington Memorial 
Library and the upgrade of the fire alarm system to provide signage and 
handicapped accessible pull stations at the Boutwell School and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move to raise by taxation and appropriate 
the sum of $ 9 , PPP for the purpose of upgrading town facilities as 
identified in the town's Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan 
on file in the office of the Town Manager, such upgrades to include 
replacement of the existing doors and installation of an automatic door 
opening system at the Wilmington Memorial Library and the upgrade of the 
fire alarm system to provide signage and handicapped accessible pull 
stations at the Boutwell School." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 9 , PPP . 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the Fiscal Year 1996 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of 
various town departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move that the town vote to 
transfer from the Fiscal Year 1996 budget, the sum of $ 5P , PPP from 
Maturing Debt and Interest - Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt 
and the sum of $ 7P , PPP from Unclassfied and Reserve - Insurance to the 
following Fiscal Year 1996 Accounts: 



Public Works Contractual Services - Snow $7P,PPP 

and Ice Miscellaneous Services 

Unclassified and Reserve, Medicare $25, PPP 

Employers' Contributon 

Unclassified and Reserve, Computer $ 7,5PP 

Hardware/Software Maintenace and Expense 

Public Buildings - Expenses $1P,PPP 

Selectmen's Legislative - Expenses $ 5, PPP 

Veterans Aid and Benefits - Assistance Veterans $ 2,5PP" 



Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 



-IIP- 



ARTICLE 12 . To see if the tovm will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money from available funds for the Department of Public Works, Chapter 90 
Construction Fund Account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate from Chapter 90 Construction Funds the sum of $ 577 . 121 to 
the Department of Public Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund 
Account." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 13. (drawn as #20) To see if the town will vote to authorize its 
Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance agreement or 
agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years pursuant to M.G.L., 
Chapter 44, Section 53F; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to authorize its 
Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance agreement or 
agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years pursuant to 
M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53F." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 14. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into 
contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without further 
appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United States Federal Government 
under any Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under 
any State Grant Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and 
enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, 
without further appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United 
States Federal Government under any Federal Grant Program and the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State Grant Program. " Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #26) To see if the town will accept as town ways, the 
layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and laid out by the Selectmen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on 
Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain such 
land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing 
or otherwise for the purpose of constructing said ways and for the payment of 
any damages from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefore : 

a. Aqostino Drive - From Agostino Drive a distance of 580 feet, more or 
less, westerly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Agostino Drive and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 186, Plan 49 on August 31, 1994, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. 
d/b/a Robert E. Anderson, Inc., dated November 10, 1995. 

b. Allqrove Lane - From Allgrove Lane a distance of 43 feet, more or less, 
westerly to a dead end as shown on a definitive subdivision plan 
entitled Allgrove Estates II, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 181, Plan 54 on April 16, 1993, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc., 
Kenneth J. Miller, PLS dated August 11, 1994. 



-Ill- 



c. Amherst Road - From Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 1,500 feet, more or 
less, westerly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Amherst Road, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds, Pi an Book 169, Plan 132 on July 5, 1989, and as shown on a 
street acceptance plan prepared by David E. Beede, PLS, PE dated 
February 18, 1994. 

d. Crystal Road - From Woburn Street a distance of 895 feet, more or less, 
southeasterly, through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Waterford Estates, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 164, Plan 72, on April 27, 1988, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. Anderson, Inc. 
dated February 14, 1994, signed by George W. Dupree, PLS on July 17, 
1995 . 

e. Fernbanks Road - From Mill Road a distance of 550 feet, more or less, 
northerly, through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Mill Road Estates, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 174, Plan 150 on December 20, 1990, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. Anderson, Inc., 
George W. Dupree, PLS on November 6, 1995. 

f. Flynn Way - From Federal Street a distance of 680 feet, more or less, 
northwesterly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Flynn Village, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 183, Plan 66 on November 5, 1993, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Troy, Meede and 
Associates, Richard J. Meede, Jr., PLS dated February 2, 1996. 

g. Towpath Drive - From Towpath Drive a distance of 886 feet, more or less, 
southeasterly, to Butters Row as shown on a definitive subdivision plan 
entitled Chestnut Estates II, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 166, Plan 20 on August 25, 1988, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. 
dated September 21, 1995. 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "Motion to accept streets reads the same as 
the above article, with the addition of $ 100 to be raised by taxation." 
Planning Board recommends approval as all issues concerning Amherst Road 
have been resolved to the satisfaction of the Planning Board. Finance 
Committee also recommends approval based on Planning Board approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, $ 100 . 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E 1/2 for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and further to establish a 
spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town authorize the Town 
Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and 
further to establish a spending limit of not more than $ 4 , 500 for said 
account." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 17. (drawn as #11) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans 
Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 5 , 000 for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances . " Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 5 , 000 . 



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ARTICLE 18. (drawn as #8) To see if the tovm will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $ 2,250 ) for the purpose of 
renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 4 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose 
of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $2,250 ) for the purpose 
of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 4 of the 
General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose 
of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $ 2,250 . 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen real 
estate tax payment vouchers for services rendered to the town in accordance 
with the town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of $ 10 , 000 for the purpose of providing senior citizen 
real estate tax payment vouchers for services rendered to the town in 
accordance with the town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Mrs. Linehan complimented Diane 
Allan for her work on this program. Town Manager explained, this 
program is for Senior Citizens, sixty or over, who own their home and 
live there. School Department now has three seniors and the Town Hall 
has one senior participating in the program. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $ 10 , 000 . 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn as #24) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the construction of sewers, sewage systems and disposal 
facilities known as the Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project, and to authorize the 
Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire interests in land whether by 
purchase, eminent domain, gift or otherwise, and to direct the assessment of 
one hundred percent (100%) betterments, all in accordance with General Laws 
Chapter 2 97 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition 
thereto and other General or Special Laws hereto enabling; to determine 
whether said funds shall be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds, 
or by borrowing under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, or by any 
combination thereof; and to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for any federal and state 
aid and to receive gifts which may be available as contributions to be applied 
toward the cost of the project; or do anything in relation thereto. 



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Motion by Noel D. Baratta, "I move that the town vote to appropriate the 
sum of $ 985 , OOP for the construction of sewers, sewage systems and 
disposal facilities known as the Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project, a copy 
of said plans are on file at the office of the Water and Sewer 
Commission and to authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire 
interests in land whether by purchase, eminent domain, gift or 
otherwise, and to direct the assessment of one hundred percent (100%) 
betterments, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 297 of the Acts 
of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other 
General or Special Laws hereto enabling; said funds to be raised by 
borrowing under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44 and to 
authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for any federal and state aid and to receive gifts 
which may be available as contributions to be applied toward the cost of 
the project." Finance Committee recommends approval. Mr. Baratta, 
Water & Sewer Commissioner, explained this project will lay sewer lines 
down Route 38 from the intersection of Route 129 to the intersection of 
Route 62. The project will coincide with the Route 38 corridor widening 
project. Wilmington Chamber of Commerce supports this project. The 
cost will be paid through betterments by about forty businesses on Main 
Street. This will increase property values in the area. Slide screen 
display was presented by Thomas Jenkins explaining the project. Mr. 
Baratta stated this is a win win, situation for the community. Motion 
made to move the question Yes 127 No 1. This article needs 2/3rds vote. 
Voted Yes 134 No 1 . So voted. 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn as #18) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the design and construction of a raw water main from the 
Shawsheen Avenue wellfield to the Butter's Row Water Treatment Plant including 
all appropriate Pumping Station upgrades and to authorize the Water and Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire interest in land whether by purchase, eminent domain, 
gift or otherwise, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 276 of the Acts 
of 1926 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other General or 
Special Laws hereto enabling and to determine whether said funds shall be 
raised by taxation, transfer from available funds or by borrowing under the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 44 or by any combination thereof and to 
authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for any federal and state aid and to receive gifts which 
may be available as contributions to be applied toward the cost of the 
project; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Noel Baratta, "I move that the town vote to appropriate the 
sum of $ 1,000,000 for the design and construction of a raw water main 
from the Shawsheen Avenue wellfield to the Butter's Row Water Treatment 
Plant including all appropriate Pumping Station upgrades and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire interest in land 
whether by purchase, eminent domain, gift or otherwise, all in 
accordance with General Laws Chapter 276 of the Acts of 1926 and all 
Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other General or Special 
Laws hereto enabling, said funds to be raised by borrowing under the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 44 and to authorize the Board of 
Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for 
any federal and state aid and to receive gifts which may be available as 
contributions to be applied toward the cost of the project." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. This construction would install a new 
water main from the Shawsheen Avenue wellfield to the Butters Row Water 
Treatment Plant and would boost the town's water capacity by 700,000 
gallons a day. Motion seconded. This article needs 2/3rds vote. Yes 
14 7 No 3 . So voted. 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the engineering and design of sewers, sewage systems and disposal 
facilities known as the Lowell Street Sewer Project, an area encompassing a 
portion of Lowell Street and Main Street from the intersection of Lowell 
Street and Main Street at Kiernan Avenue to the intersection of Lowell Street 
and Woburn Street, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 2 97 of the Acts 
of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other General or 
Special Laws hereto enabling; and to determine whether said funds shall be 
raised by taxation, transfer from available funds or by borrowing under the 



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provisions of General Laws Chapter 44 or by any combination thereof and to 
authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for any federal and state aid and to receive gifts which 
may be available as contributions to be applied toward the cost of the 
project; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Noel Baratta, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate by transfer from Available Fiinds - Sewer Construction 
Projects, all as authorized by General Laws Chapter 44, Section 20, the 
sum of $ 80 , OOP for the purpose of providing engineering services for 
plans, design, layout and specifications for the Lowell Street Sewer 
Project." Finance Committee recommends approval. Some residents spoke 
against this article, as they state it was of no benefit to the 
residents. Ted Tripp, Water and Sewer Commissioner, stated this is just 
the money for a design. Selectman James Rooney spoke in favor. After 
much discussion, Ann Yurek, Finance Committee, made a motion to move the 
question. Motion voted to move question, unanimously. Noel Baratta 
stated this is a golden opportunity for the town to look at whether 
sewer is needed and then to make that decision at a later date. Main 
motion then so voted. 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn as #10) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E 1/2 for the purpose of receiving monies from the Department of 
Environmental Protection Grant Program to be used for the repair and upgrade 
of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; and additionally, to 
receive monies from betterments and other loan repayments to the town from 
property owners participating in said Program; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at 
the Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for the purpose of receiving monies from the 
Department of Environmental Protection Grant Program to be used for the 
repair and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; 
and additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other loan 
repayments to the town from property owners participating in said 
Program; and further to authorize the Board of Health with the approval 
of the Town Manager to administer and expend such funds received for the 
purposes of repairing and upgrading subsurface sewage disposal systems 
under Title 5 in accordance with regulations promulgated by the 
Department of Environmental Protection." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 24. (drawn as #39) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the construction of septic systems for the subsurface disposal of 
sanitary waste, or for loans to property owners for such purposes, and to 
determine whether this appropriation shall be raised by borrowing under 
Chapter 44, by borrowing under Chapter 29C (the Massachusetts Water Pollution 
Trust) or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn as #28) To see if the town will vote to discontinue a way 
known as Olde Ballardvale Street (formerly known as and referred to as 
Ballardvale Street) and shown as Olde Ballardvale Street on Tax Assessor's Map 
R2 , all as shown on a plan on file in the Office of the Town Engineer; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to discontinue 
a way known as Olde Ballardvale Street (formerly known as and referred 
to as Ballardvale Street) and shown as Olde Ballardvale Street on Tax 
Assessor's Map R2 , or however else said property has been described or 
located, all as shown on a plan on file in the Office of the Town 
Engineer; reserving however unto the town the rights in perpetuity to 
install, improve, replace, repair and maintain all utilities contained 



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therein and without limiting the generality of the foregoing including 
water lines, sewer lines, drainage lines, and other existing utilities 
and all appurtenances thereto, in, under or above the said premises 
being discontinued." Finance Committee recommends approval. This 
roadway is adjacent to Agfa property on Ballardvale Street, and the 
company is planning major expansion and this is the procedure followed 
when town abandons a roadway. Town Manager spoke as to the importance 
of this article. This company pays taxes of $378,000 to the town and 
their expansion is of great importance to the town. The building will 
be similar to the current building. This will have no impact in the 
negative and the town will benefit. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #16) To see if the town will vote to amend the By-laws 
of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding a Section 41 to 
Chapter 5 Public Regulations to read as follows: 

Section 41: Streets and Sidewalks - Public Utilities 

Any person, firm, corporation, partnership, their agents and employees, 
who has been granted, or may be granted, any license, permission, or 
other authority to construct or maintain poles and overhead wires and 
associated overhead structures upon, along, under or across any public 
way or ways, is forbidden from installing or constructing, and shall 
remove immediately any poles, overhead wires and associated overhead 
structures which are located on, along or across Main Street (Route 38) 
from a point at Richmond Street to a point at Kirk Street; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move to pass over this Article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn as #25) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to adopt Rules and Regulations governing the installation, 
maintenance and removal of utility poles and associated wires and structures 
located on ways within the town in furtherance of any town by-law adopted 
pursuant to General Law Chapter 166; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to adopt Rules and Regulations governing the installation, 
maintenance and removal of utility poles and associated wires and 
structures located on ways within the town in furtherance of any town 
by-law adopted pursuant to General Law Chapter 166." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Marion Woller, spoke of how underground wires 
would improve the looks of the center of own. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize and 
direct the Town Manager and/or Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for enactment of special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of 
Wilmington for the purpose of enabling the town to effectively and reasonably 
regulate construction on excessively substandard lots within the town, by 
exempting the Town of Wilmington from Section Six (6) of Chapter Forty A (40A) 
of the General Laws; said legislation being entitled, "Lots Exempt" which 
reads as follows: 

AN ACT EXEMPTING THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON FROM THE OPERATION OF CERTAIN 
REQUIREMENTS OF THE STATE ZONING LAW, 

Section 1. Notwithstanding any contrary provision of law, the provision 
of Section 6 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws shall not apply to the 
Town of Wilmington. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 



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Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to authorize and 
direct the Town Manager and/or Board of Selectmen to petition the Great 
and General Court for enactment of special legislation for and on behalf 
of the Town of Wilmington for the purpose of enabling the town to 
effectively and reasonably regulate construction on excessively 
substandard lots within the town, by exempting the Town of Wilmington 
from Section Six (6) of Chapter Forty A (40A) of the General Laws; said 
legislation being entitled, 'Lots Exempt' to read as follows: 

AN ACT EXEMPTING THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON FROM THE OPERATION OF CERTAIN 
REQUIREMENTS OF THE STATE ZONING LAW. 

Section 1. Notwithstanding any contrary provisions of law, the 
provisions of Section 6 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws shall not 
apply to the Town of Wilmington. 

Section 2. Any lot having at least 5,000 square feet of area and 50 
feet of frontage on a public way which is intended to be used for 
construction of a single family home shall first be submitted to the 
Planning Board as special permit granting authority G.L. Chapter 4 OA, 
Sections lA and 9 for review as to whether construction of a single 
family home will be consistent with public health, safety and welfare 
and may be done without substantial detriment to the public good; the 
Planning Board as special permit granting authority shall consider among 
other factors the applicable zoning requirements. Title V health 
standards, groundwater contamination, availability of common sewer, and 
compliance with Official Map requirements. The Planning Board may also 
impose reasonable conditions, safeguards and limitations. 

Section 3 . All rights of appeal from the decision of the special permit 
granting authority contained in G.L. Chapter 40A shall apply hereto. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage." 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Selectmen McCoy stated he supports this article. Building on 5,000 square 
foot lots would have too great an impact on the community. Planning Board and 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Bob Hanlon, representing League of 
Woman Voters also supports this article. Attorney Alan Altman explained that 
the town is appealing the Woods court case which allowed building on 5,000 
square foot lots. This is a land use issue and a complex area of law. Bob 
Woods spoke as to the land being in his family for years and that taxes and 
betterments were paid on the property and they should be able to use the land, 
town officials estimate there could be from 200 to 800 lots this could 
involve. Dan Gillis spoke as to how Fred F. Cain, Sr. enacted this 
legislation for the Town of Wilmington to be exempted from building on these 
small lots. Mark Haldane, motion to move the question. Motion seconded and 
voted unanimously. Main motion voted. Yes 160 No 2. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and the associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington relative to the 
sale of used vehicles by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend Section 3.5.16 Vehicle Dealership to read as follows: 

Vehicle Dealership - Salesroom and related dealership facilities for new 
automobiles, trucks, boats, motorcycles, farm implements, light 
industrial equipment and similar light vehicles having a maximum 6,000 
pound gross vehicle weight or 13 5 inch wheel base. The sale of used 
vehicles is allowed if located on the same site as a new vehicle 
dealership. Open air display of new and used vehicles is permitted if 
located on the same site as the dealership. 

(2) Amend Section 3.7.1 Prohibited Uses as follows: 

Add the phrase "sale of used vehicles except if located on the same site 
as a new vehicle dealership;" after the phrase "billboard;" or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



Motion by Carole Hamilton of Planning Board reads same as above article. 
Moderator will be taking up Article 29 and Article 30 together as they 
are related. See discussion on Articles 29 and 30 after Article 30 
below. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and the associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington relative to 
the sale of used vehicles by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend Section 3.5.16 Vehicle Dealership to read as follows: 

New Vehicle Dealership - Salesroom and related dealership facilities for 
new automobiles, trucks, boats, motorcycles, farm implements, light 
industrial equipment and similar light vehicles having a maximum 6,000 
pound gross vehicle weight or 135 inch wheel base. Open air display of 
vehicles is permitted if located on the same site as the salesroom and 
related facilities. 

(2) Add a new Section 4.1.13 as follows: 

Used Vehicle Sales - In the General Business (GB) and General Industrial 
(GI) Districts, automobile service stations and auto repair and body 
shops may use the paved portion of their lot for the sale of used 
vehicles. "For Sale" signs not greater than 20% of the vehicle 
windshield are permitted, and must be attached to the vehicle. All 
other signs advertising used vehicle sales are prohibited. Up to six 
(6) vehicles may be displayed for sale, but in any case, no more than 
20% of the paved portion of the lot may be used for used vehicle sales. 

The sale of used vehicles is allowed at new vehicle dealerships, 
provided the vehicles are displayed on the same site as the salesroom 
and related dealership facilities; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion on Article 30 made by Daniel C. Wandell. Discussion taken up on both 
Articles 29 and 30. Michael Roche of Planning Board does not think used cars 
should be sold along Route 38. Town Manager explained that now used cars can 
only be sold in conjunction with new car dealerships. Neither article allows 
a "Used Car Lot." Used cars would only be sold in full service stations, 
automotive or body shop. Article 30 allows for enforcement. Austin Rounds of 
Planning Board supports Article 30. Sale of used cars is going on in town and 
this will regulate it. Selectmen Rooney and Wandell support Article 30. John 
Forrest, Article 30 helps business, vote for 30. Chief Bobby Stewart, 
supports Article 30. Robert Cain spoke as to the confusion of one member of 
government supporting one article and another supporting the other article. 
Selectmen will still be the licensing agent. Motion to move question. Yes 
162 No 2. Vote was then taken on each article. Needs 2/3rds vote. Finance 
Committee recommends disapproval of Article 29. Planning Board recommends 
approval of Article 29. Vote on Article 29, Yes 73 No 82. Motion fails. 
Article 30, Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends 
disapproval. Vote on Article 30, Yes 93 No 65. Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #13) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation 
Commission. Said parcels are described as Map 41, Parcels 64, 65, 66 and 67; 
Map 45, Parcel 40; and Map 77, Parcel 4B; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Conservation Commission. Said parcels are described as Map 41, Parcels 
64, 65, 66 and 67; Map 45, Parcel 40; and Map 77, Parcel 4B." Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommends approval. Motion voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 

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municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 7, Parcels 57 and 58; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 7, Parcels 57 and 58; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Moderator will hear Article 32 and 33 together as they are the same article 
petitioned by two different people. 

Article 32 presented by Dion DeJesus, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having 
been determined to be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and 
for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with 
the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen be and are 
hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price of not less than $ 34 , 500 . 
and upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the 
Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and 
interest are described as Map 7, Parcels 57 and 58." 

The other petitioner D. Pirosi was not present. He would like to build a 
house for his sister on this land. Finance Committee took no action and 
Planning Board disapproves. Town Manager declared land surplus to needs of 
the town. Fair market value set by Assessor $34,500. Carole Hamilton stated 
this is not a buildable lot. This will be a competitive bid and if lot is not 
buildable no permits will be issued. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 176 No 
21. So voted. 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn #12) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 9, Parcel 23; or do anything in relation 
thereto. This land is not declared surplus to needs of town. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move that we pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn as #19) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described to the Selectmen 
of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that 



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the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest 
in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price not less than 
$12,500 and upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the 
Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are 
described as Map 49, Parcels 33 and 34; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Patricia Gushing, 56 Garden Avenue, "I move that the town vote 
to authorize to transfer, article reads the same as above with the 
amendement setting a price of $31,250 set by Town Assessor." 

Motion seconded. Finance Gommittee and Planning Board recommends disapproval. 
Richard O'Neil represented Ann Arsenault, the petitioner. He stated this 
article is similar to Articles 32 and 33 to allow for a competitive bid to 
take place on this parcel. It is the intent of his client to combine with our 
property owned and build a home. Residents spoke of small roads in area that 
will not support more homes. There are partially completed lots in the area. 
They would not like to see more homes. Planning Board recommends holding 
these parcels for open space. The area is built up and the existing roadway 
infrastructure is unsatisfactory and cannot accommodate additional 
development. Vote was Yes 45 No 92. Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn as #27) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to convey an easement to Sixth Realty Trust of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, for the purpose of constructing, operating and maintaining a 
sewer main and fixtures appurtenant thereto, upon, over, under and across a 
portion of a certain way known as Third Avenue as now laid out or as may be 
laid out in the future in the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts, a copy of which plan is on file with the Conservation 
Commission. Said private way as now laid out and shown on a plan entitled, 
"Shawsheen Pines, Billerica-Wilmington, Massachusetts, Engineer: Harry F. 
Bryant & Son, Date: April 1927" and recorded in Plan Book 50, Plan 61 at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Lowell, Massachusetts, is contiguous to 
town-owned land shown as Block 15, Lots 20 - 29 on said plan, also shown as 
Assessor's Map 11, Parcel 34; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Petitioner was not present. 

Motion by Robert Cain, "I move to pass over this article." Seconded 
and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 37. (drawn as #15) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission, and either of them, to 
grant to Dorothy Sullivan and Joseph M. Sullivan a right of way from Cook 
Street to their residence property known as 3 Border Road in Wilmington and to 
authorize the Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court for 
legislative approval thereof pursuant to Article 97 of the Amendments of the 
Massachusetts Constitution; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Charles Gilbert, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission, and either of them, 
to grant to Dorothy Sullivan and Joseph M. Sullivan a right of way from 
Cook Street to their residence property known as 3 Border Road in 
Wilmington and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the Great and 
General Court for legislative approval thereof pursuant to Article 97 of 
the Amendments of the Massachusetts Constitution." 

Finance Committee recommends disapproval . Planning Board has no 
recommendation. Mr. Charles Gilbert, Redevelopment member stated this article 
is to rectify an oversight on the part of the Redevelopment Commisssion which 
occurred in 1972 during the development of Jewel Drive. This easement would 
be a fifteen foot driveway, sixty feet long to service this one family. This 
land is surplus to the needs of the town and these people are land locked. 
There would be no cost to the town. Lynn Guzinski of Conservation Commission 
stated the applicant did not come before the Commission before they submitted 
this article to Town Meeting. This is the procedure established and it should 
be followed. Mr. Altman stated we should word article, subject to the 
approval of Conservation Commission. Mr. Gilbert, "I move to amend article to 
read passage of this article is contingent on a vote of approval of the 
Conservation Commission." Town Counsel, Alan Altman, there should be a vote 



-120- 



of approval prior to going to the general court. Voted to end debate Yes 157 
No 1. Voted. Vote on the amendment so voted. Article as amended so voted 
Yes 190 No 10. Motion passes. 

ARTICLE 38. (dravm as #9) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to close, to all commercial traffic over 5 tons, that part 
of Woburn Street running from Route 62 north to Andover Street and Andover 
Street from Woburn Street to the industrial zoned area south of Route 12 5 
excepting such traffic authorized by them necessary for the health and safety 
of the community; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Conrad J. Gerhartz, "To see if the town will vote to have the 
Wilmington Board of Selectmen close all thru commercial truck traffic 
over that part of Woburn Street running from Route 62 north to Andover 
Street, and Andover Street from Woburn Street to the Industrial Zoned 
area south of Route 125 excepting such traffic authorized by them 
necessary for the health and safety of the community. " 

Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Mr. Gerhartz 
stated this is an old colonial road and traffic is a hazard for residents. 
Many children in area and one cannot walk on road. Selectmen Robert Cain and 
Michael McCoy stated they suppport this article. Selectmen James Rooney, how 
would this affect the Weigh Station at the Highway Department that is used by 
the Police Department? Attorney Altman stated that you cannot prevent traffic 
on a public road but can place limitations. Chief Stewart supports this 
article, but it is not necessary since Board of Selectmen can regulate 
traffic. Finance Committee recommends approval as long as article reads thru 
traffic. Barbara Sullivan motion to move question. Voted Yes 153 No 1. 
Main motion as amended so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn as #22) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
acquisition of land by process of Eminent Domain, Map 103, Lots 11 and 24A, 
unbuildable lots in a residential zone. Both lots located in Zone I and II of 
the watershed for protection of the Browns Crossing wellfield. Action to take 
place in the tax year 1997. Owners of record to be paid for the land at 
latest assessed value; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee disapproves. Motion by Conrad Gerhartz same as the above 
article. Town Manager, this is ill advised article, passage could mean a 
blank check in terms of costs to the community. Mr. Gerhartz, amended article 
to acquire this land by purchase, gift and remove the words Eminent Domain. 
Motion seconded. Water and Sewer Commissioner Neil Waisnor stated this is not 
a cost effective way to acquire land. A series of amendments followed: 

1. Iva Rideout, only include Lot 11 to take by purchase or gift, delete 
24A. 

2. Carole Hamilton strike Eminent Domain and take Lot 11 by gift only. 
Mr. Ahern disagrees with taking his land by gift only. 

3. Mr. Ahern, "I would like to make an amendment to withdraw the article." 
Moderator stated only the maker of article can withdraw. Mr. Ahern then 
made a motion to pass over this article. Question was asked can motion 
to withdraw be reconsidered. Answer no. Motion to pass over so voted. 

ARTICLE 40. (drawn as #14) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that George 
E. Flodin be allowed to take the civil service Fire Department entrance 
examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the Wilmington Fire Department 
notwithstanding that he is more than thirty- two years old; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Mrs. Flodin, "I move that the town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that George 
E. Flodin be allowed to take the civil service Fire Department entrance 
examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the Wilmington Fire 
Department notwithstanding that he is more than thirty- two years old." 



-121- 



George Flodin is only one year over the age and would like to take the exam to 
qualify. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Dick Duggan, Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Richard Wright supports, if person able to do 
the job they should be able to take exam. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 41. (Dravm as #4) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that 
Kathleen V. Murphy be allowed to take the civil service Fire Department 
entrance examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the Wilmington Fire 
Department, notwithstanding that she is more than thirty- two years old; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by William Murphy, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that 
Kathleen V. Murphy be allowed to take the civil service Fire Department 
entrance examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the Wilmington 
Fire Department, notwithstanding that she is more than thirty- two years 
old." Finance Committee recommends disapproval. He spoke on behalf of 
his wife, Kathleen Murphy, "I believe no one should be denied if they 
are mentally, morally and physically fit." Dick Duggan, of Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Charles Gilbert spoke in opposition. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 42. (drawn as #23) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the design and construction of sewers, sewage systems and 
disposal facilities in Webber Street, starting at Cedar Street and extending 
approximately six hundred feet (600'), more or less, to the property line 
shown on Assessor's Map 30, Parcel 7C and further shown on a plan entitled 
"Webber Street Sewer Project" on file in the office of the Superintendent of 
Water and Sewer and to authorize the Water and Sewer Commission to acquire 
interest in land whether by purchase, gift or eminent domain or otherwise and 
to direct the assessment of 100% betterments, all in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment or in addition 
thereto and other general or specific laws thereto enabling; to determine 
whether said funds shall be raised by transfer from available funds or by 
borrowing under provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44 or by any combination thereof; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Jay Neale, "I move to withdraw this article." Motion seconded 
and so voted to withdraw. 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn as #30) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following parcels of land 
located in north Wilmington as listed on the Assessor's legal file of Map R3 , 
Parcels 4, 4A, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6, 8 and 8A; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Susan Bognore, 400A Andover St., "I move that the town vote to 
amend the Zoning By-laws and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the 
following parcels of land located in northern Wilmington as listed on 
the Assessor's legal file of Map R3 , Parcels 4, 4A, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6, 8 and 
8A. " These parcels are surrounded by R-20 subdivisions. Three of the 
parcels would not be able to be built upon even at R-20. They are too 
small. Edward Ferguson, 402 Andover Street spoke, he has seven and half 
acres. He cannot maintain his property. He was informed that spot 
zoning would not pass, so his neighbors agreed to go along with this 
zoning. Dirk Peterson of 415 Andover Street stated this article went 1 
from rezoning for financial hardship to rezoning the neighborhood. The 
street is dangerous. Keep the rest of Andover Street rural. Motion was 
made by Kimberly Enders, 415 Andover Street, "I move to amend Article 43 
by removing Parcels 8 and 8A from the original article." Carole 
Hamilton of Planning Board stated there has been a misunderstanding on 
rezoning, it is not how many lots you rezone but you need to touch the 
district you need to go into. Motion to move question was voted, f 
unanimously. Amendment to delete Parcels 8 and 8A voted, unanimously. 
Main motion as amended Yes 70 No 30. Motion passed. 

1 
I 

-122- 



ARTICLE 44. (drawn as 
By-laws and Zoning Map 
Residential 60 (R-60) t 
shown on Assessor's Map 
16A; part of parcel 16B 
31B, 32, 33, 33A and 34 
all of parcels 7, 8, 9, 
21, 21A and 2 IB; part o 
of parcels 25, 26, 28, 
parcels 33 and 34B; all 
47, 48, 49, 49B, 49C, 5 
56C, 56D, 57A, 57B, 57C 
65A, 65B, 66, 67, 69, 7 
82A, 82B, 83, 84, 85, 8 
or do anything in relat 



#18) To see if the town will vote to 
of the Town of Wilmington by voting t 
o Residential 20 (R-20) that land des 
83, part of parcels 11, 13, 14 and 1 
, all of parcels 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 
and Assessor's Map 84, part of parce 
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 14A, 14B, 16, 17 
f parcel 22; all of parcels 23A, 23B, 
29, 30, 30A, 30B and 31; all of parce 

of parcels 35, 36, 37, 40A, 41, 42, 
0, 51, 52, 53, 54, 54A, 55, 55A, 55B, 

57D, 58, 59, 59A, 59B, 60, 61, 62, 
0, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79 
6, part of parcels 87, 88 and 88B and 
ion thereto. 



amend the Zoning 

rezone from 
cribed as land 
5A; all of parcel 
30, 30A, 31, 31A, 
1 s 4 , 5 and 6 ; 
, 18, 19, 20, 20A, 

23C and 24; part 

1 31A; part of 
43, 44, 45, 46A, 

56, 56A, 56B, 
63, 63A, 64A, 64B, 
, 80, 81A, 81B, 
all of parcel 89; 



Motion by Russell Stanton, stated he would like to amend above article and add 
Map 84 - Parcels 36A and 80A. These were left off due to a typographical 
error. Motion seconded. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend 
disapproval. Mr. Stanton would like to rezone from R-60 to R-20. He and his 
wife wish to subdivide their lot to build a house. Only nine lots in area 
conform to R-60. Mr^ Fleming, 17 Royal Street stated he has a 15,000 sq. ft. 
lot and people who have larger lots are penalized. Mr. Diorio, Planning 
Board, there are procedures to build houses, such as going before Board of 
Appeals. Lisa Stanton, Colbalt Street, stated they were advised by Planning 
Board to do rezoning this way. Carole Hamilton, we neither encouraged nor 
discouraged. Barbara Sullivan, League of Women Voters oppossed to this 
article. Dan Gillis, say no to this article. Needs 2/3rds vote. Yes 18 No 
143. Motion fails. 

The attendance at Town Meeting was as follows and the meeting adjourned in 
early evening at 5:40 p.m. 



10:45 A.M. 
1 : 10 P.M. 



164 
257 



2:00 P.M. 
NonVoters 



300 
27 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 1996 



Total 

Appropriation 



By Transfer 



By Taxation 



70, 000 
50, 000 
120, 000 



70, 000 
50. 000 
120, 000 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 19 97 



Total 

Appropriation 



By Transfer 



By Taxation 



SCHOOL BUDGET 
MUNICIPAL BUDGET 
CAPITAL OUTLAY 
WARRANT ARTICLES 
TOTAL BUDGET 



17, 149, 466 
17, 221, 150 
427, 084 
17 , 350 
34, 815, 050 



1, 197, 626 



1, 197, 626 



17, 149, 466 
16, 023, 524 
427, 084 
17, 350 
33,617,424 



STATUTORY CHARGES 3,457,566 
TOTAL 38 . 272 , 616 

Bonding 
985, 000 
1. OOP . OOP 
1. 985, OOP 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

CEMETERY SALES 
CEMETERY INTEREST 
WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 
TOTAL 



87, P42 
1, 284, 668 



35, PPP 
15, 000 
1 ,234 . 668 
1 , 284 , 668 



-123- 



WARRANT STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 17. 1996 



WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections 
to vote at West Intermediate School (Precincts 1 & 2) , Wildwood School 
(Precincts 3 & 4) and Town Hall (Precincts 5 & 6) on Tuesday, the seventeenth 
day of September, 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: United States Senator for the 
Commonwealth; Representative in Congress for the Sixth Congressional District; 
Councillor for the Fifth Councillor District; Senator in General Court for the 
First Essex/Middlesex District; Representative in General Court for the 
Twentieth Middlesex District; Representative in General Court for the Twenty- 
Third Middlesex District; Register of Probate for the County; County Treasurer 
for the County; County Commissioner for the County; and Sheriff for Middlesex 
County. 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY . 
UNITED STATES SENATOR 

John F. Kerry 778 

Others 1 

Blanks 269 

Total 10 3 9 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - SIXTH DISTRICT 

John Gutta 146 

John F. Tierney 679 

Blanks 214 

Total 1039 

COUNCILLOR - FIFTH DISTRICT 

Patricia Dowling 472 

James P. Mahoney 2 94 

Blanks 273 

Total 1039 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT - 1ST ESSEX & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Klaus Kubierschky 5 50 

Blanks 489 

Total 1039 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - 2 0TH MIDDLESEX 

James R. Miceli 760 

Blanks 135 

Total 895 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - 2 3RD MIDDLESEX 

John McCulloch 17 

Virginia E. Mooney 28 

Charles A. Murphy 90 

Blanks 9 

Total 144 

REGISTER OF PROBATE -MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

Robert B. Antonelli 233 

John J. Buckley 141 

Francis X. Flaherty 102 

Diane Poulos Harpell 47 

Marie E. Howe 135 

Joyce E. Hurley 37 

Donald A. MacDonald 105 

Wanda M. Milik 49 

Blanks 190 

Total 1039 



-124- 



TREASURER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

James E. Fahey, Jr. 4 74 

Warren R. McManus 280 

Blanks 285 

Total 1039 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY - VOTE FOR TWO 

Thomas J. Larkin 233 

Melissa Hurley 276 

James P. Kenney 248 

Eleanor A. McGarry 187 

Joseph W. Mullin 95 

Edward J. Sullivan 235 

Blanks 804 

Total 2078 

SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY - VACANCY 

James V. DiPaola 403 

Leonard H. Colder 56 

Edward J. Kennedy, Jr. 344 

Edward J. Rideout 106 

Blanks 130 

Total 103 9 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

William F. Weld 267 

Others 3 

Blanks 28 

Total 298 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - SIXTH DISTRICT 

Peter G. Torkildsen 239 

Blanks 59 

Total 298 

COUNCILLOR - FIFTH DISTRICT 

Kevin J. Leach 2 05 

Blanks 93 

Total 298 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT - FIRST ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

Bruce E. Tarr 231 

Blanks 67 

Total 298 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - TWENTIETH MIDDLESEX 

Al Meegan 238 

Blanks 60 

Total 298 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - TWENTY- THIRD MIDDLESEX 

George L. Judge, Jr. 4 7 

Blanks 10 

Total 57 

REGISTER OF PROBATE - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

Donna M. Lambert 210 

Blanks 88 

Total 298 

TREASURER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

No Nomination 6 3 

Blanks 235 

Total 298 



-125- 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
Anthony G. Marino 
Jerry Vengrow 
Blanks 
Total 



VOTE FOR TWO 



204 
155 

237 
596 



SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
Brad Bailey 
Blanks 
Total 



236 
62 
298 



LIBERTARIAN 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 
Randy Fritz 
Larry Stone 
George Phillips 
Blanks 
Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



- SIXTH DISTRICT 



COUNCILLOR - FIFTH DISTRICT 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



FIRST ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - TWENTIETH MIDDLESEX 

No Nomination 1 

Blanks 4 

Total 5 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
No Nomination 
Total 



TWENTY- THIRD MIDDLESEX 



REGISTER OF PROBATE 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



TREASURER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



- MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



VOTE FOR TWO 



2 
8 
10 



SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
No Nomination 
Blanks 
Total 



The three polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. 
Results were announced at 11:00 p.m. 1,342 persons voted. This includes 
forty-eight (48) absentee ballots which reflects 11% of the 12,523 registered 
voters. The West Intermediate School was added as a polling place for this 
election and all went smoothly at the new location. 



-126- 



DISTRICT WIDE RECOUNT - COUNTY COMMISSIONER 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1996 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

In the matter of the district wide recount, Democratic Primary for County 
Commissioner. This procedure was held in the Town of Wilmington, on Monday, 
September 30, 1996 at 4:00 p.m. in Room 9 at the Town Hall. 

All was made ready according to Chapter 54, Section 135, 135A of the General 
Laws. The Board of Registrars, Town Clerk, and seven election workers were 
used for the process. The Town Counsel and a Voting Machine Technician were 
also present. Three observers representing candidates attended. 

The results were as follows, the same as original figures: 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY - VOTE FOR TWO 

Thomas J. Larkin 
Melissa Hurley 
James P. Kenney 
Eleanor A. McGarry 
Joseph W. Mull in 
Edward J. Sullivan 
Blanks 
Total 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 28, 1996 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

The meeting was called to order by Town Moderator, James Stewart with a quorum 
present of one hundred fifty-two (152) at 7:45 p.m. 

Selectman James Rooney, "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded. Articles will be by random draw as prescribed by 
the town's Inhabitant By-law. 

ARTICLE 1. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen and the Town Manager to take such action as may be requested by the 
North East Solid Waste Committee ("NESWC") to implement the NESWC strategic 
plan as that plan relates to the town, including without limitation entering 
into an agreement with Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MRI") the provisions 
of which will (i) supplement or replace provisions of the existing Service 
Agreement between the town and MRI, (ii) extend the Service Agreement term to 
June 30, 2015 and/or (iii) provide for a revised service fee and such other 
terms and conditions as the Selectmen and Town Manager shall determine as 
necessary and in the best interests of the town; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to take such action as 
may be requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee ("NESWC") to 
implement the NESWC strategic plan as that plan relates to the town, 
including without limitation entering into an agreement with 
Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MRI") the provisions of which will (i) 
supplement or replace provisions of the existing Service Agreement 
between the town and MRI, and/or (ii) extend the Service Agreement term 
to September 30, 2015 or such other date as the Selectmen and the Town 
Manager shall approve and/or (iii) provide for a revised service fee 
and/or such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen and Town Manager 
shall determine as necessary and in the best interests of the town." 

This motion changes the date only from the original article. The town is 
being presented with three options concerning solid waste disposal. The price 
to remain the same at $95.00 a ton, or new options of 10 year amended 
agreement or a new 20 year agreement to 2015. The Town Manager recommends 
extending the contract to 20 years, at a set fee of $108 per ton. Level of 
predictability is always best for budget purposes. Stephen Rothstein, 



233 
276 
248 
187 
95 
235 
804 
2078 



-127- 



Executive Director of NESWC, explained the reasons for the costs, with an 
excellent slide presentation. When this contract was written the plant was 
expected to make significant profit from the sale of electricity. Prices, 
however, fell and rates stabilized, leading to high tipping fees that towns 
must pay. Eight of the twenty- three (23) communities involved are looking at 
the 10 year to 20 year plan and three others have selected the 10 year plan. 
Selectman Michael McCoy supports the article, the fix rate is best. James 
Rooney also supports this article, let the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen 
negotiate the contract. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 163 No 4. 

ARTICLE 2. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from available funds the sum of $96,190 to the Department of 
Public Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate from Chapter 90 Construction Funds the sum of $ 96 , 190 to the 
Department of Public Works Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account." 

This is state money to be used for road construction and equipment. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will authorize the Town Manager, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to sell any personal property or material 
in excess of the aggregate of $500 and deemed surplus to the needs of the town 
and to determine the appropriate disposition of said property; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town authorize the Town 
Manager, with the approval of the Selectmen, to sell any personal 
property or material in excess of the aggregate of $ 500 and deemed 
surplus to the needs of the town and to determine the appropriate 
disposition of said property and further that any proceeds from the sale 
of such property shall be transferred to the Capital Stabilization Fund." 

Finance Committee recommends approval . The Town Manager explained the need for 
this article and that there would also be public advertisement. Motion 
seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money not to exceed $54,000 for the addition of buses to 
the transportation fleet for the Wilmington Public Schools and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. The Town Moderator 
read a letter from the School Committee asking to have this article withdrawn. 
Motion by Town Manager, Michael Caira to withdraw. Motion seconded and so 
voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by taking the 
following actions: 

A. Add a new section 6.7 Adult Use District as follows: 

6.7.1 Purpose and Intent: It is the purpose and intent of this Section 

6.7 to address and mitigate the secondary effects of the Adult Uses 
referenced herein, since such secondary effects have been found by 
the Wilmington Planning Board, as a result of the studies relied 
upon by the Wilmington Planning Board and after other public input, 
to include increased crime, adverse impacts on public health, 
negative impact on retail business climate, and declining 
residential and commercial property values. The provisions of this 
Section have neither the purpose nor intent of imposing a 
limitation or restriction on freedom of expression as protected by 
the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Neither is 
it the purpose or intent of this Section to legalize the sale, 
rental, distribution, or exhibition of obscene or other illegal 
matter or materials. 



-128- 



6.7.2 The Adult Use district is herein established as an overlay district 
and shall be superimposed on the other districts established by 
this By-law. Adult uses shall be prohibited at any other location 
in tovm. 

6.7.2.3 Boundaries: Boundaries of the Adult Use District are shown on the 
Zoning Map and include the following parcels as identified on the 
1996 Assessor's Map R-3: Parcels 25, 25A, 29, 29A, 29B, 29C, 39, 
44, 44A, 49, BOA, SOB, 401 and 402. 

6.7.3 Definitions: 

Adult Uses: An establishment having a substantial or significant 
portion of its business activity, stock in trade, or other 
materials for sale, rental, or display, which are distinguished or 
characterized by their emphasis on matter depicting, describing, or 
relating to sexual conduct as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, 
section 31, including but not limited to the following: 

6.7.3.1 Adult Bookstore: An establishment having as a substantial or 
significant portion of its stock in trade, books, magazines, and 
other matter which are distinguished or characterized by their 
emphasis depicting, describing or relating to sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.2 Adult Entertainment Club: An establishment which provides live 
entertainment for its patrons which includes the display of nudity 
as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.3 Adult Motion Picture Theater: An establishment used for presenting 
material distinguished by an emphasis on matter depicting, 
describing, or relating to sexual conduct or sexual excitement as 
defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.4 Adult Paraphernalia Store: An establishment having as a 
substantial or significant portion of its stock, devices, objects, 
tools or toys which are distinguished or characterized by their 
association with sexual activity, including sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.5 Adult Video Store: An establishment having as a substantial or 
significant portion of its stock in trade videos, movies or other 
film materials which are distinguished or characterized by their 
emphasis depicting, describing, or relating to sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement, as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.4 Substantial or Significant Portion: The term "substantial or 
significant portion" as used herein shall mean any of the 
following : 

a. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the business inventory or stock 
of merchandise for sale, rental, distribution, or exhibition 
during any period of time; or 

b. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the annual number of gross 
sales, rentals, or other business transactions; or 

c. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the annual gross business 
revenue ; or 

d. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the hours during which the 
establishment is open. 

6.7.5 Special Permit: 

No Adult Use shall be allowed except by a Special Permit granted by 
the Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall grant a Special 
Permit only upon the determination that the location and design are 
in harmony with its surroundings, that adequate safeguards exist 
through licensing or other means to assure on a continuing basis 



-129- 



li 



that activities therein will not be patently contrary to prevailing 
standards of adults in the community and will not involve minors in 
any way, and only if the use is found by the Board of Appeals to 
comply with the following minimum special permit criteria. 

6.7.5.1 Location: Lots containing an Adult Use may not be located: 

a. Within five hundred (500) feet of a boundary line of a 
residential zoning district; 

b. Within one thousand (1,000) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing a church, school, or library. 

c. Within five hundred (500) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing an establishment licensed under the provisions of 
Section 12 of Chapter 138 of the General Laws. 

d. Within five hundred (500) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing any other Adult Use as defined herein. 

6.7.5.2 No Special Permit for an Adult Use shall be issued to any person 
convicted of violating the provisions of M.G.L., Chapter 119, 
section 63 or Chapter 272, section 28. 

6.7.5.3 The hours in which Adult Uses are open to the public shall be 
limited as follows: adult bookstore, adult paraphernalia store, 
adult video store or similar adult use between the hours of 9:00 
a.m. and 9:00 p.m., adult motion picture theater, adult 
entertainment club or similar adult use between the hours of 4:00 
p.m. and 12:00 midnight. 

6.7.5.4 Site Development Standards: 

a. Site Plan Review: No Special Permit for any Adult Use shall be 
issued without prior Site Plan Approval from the Planning Board. 

b. Dimensional Requirements: Any building or structure containing 
an Adult Use shall meet the setback requirements and other 
dimensional controls of the underlying district as specified in 
these By-laws. 

c. Parking and Loading: On-site parking and loading shall be 
provided in accordance with the requirements set forth in 
Section 6.4.1.1 of these By-laws as pertains to retail and 
service business. All parking areas shall be illuminated and 
all lighting shall be contained on the property. 

d. Landscaping: As required under Site Plan Review. 

e. Signage: Any sign that depicts, describes or relates to nudity 
or sexual conduct as defined in M.G.L., Chapter 272, section 31, 
and that is visible from the outside of the building is 
prohibited. 

6.7.6 Any Adult Use in existence prior to the adoption of this Section 

6.7 shall apply for a Special Permit as specified in this Section 
6.7 within ninety (90) days following the adoption of Section 6.7. 



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6.7.7 



The application for a Special Permit for an Adult Use must include 
the following information: 



a. Name and address of the legal ovmer of the proposed 
establishment ; 

b. Name and address of all persons having a lawful, equity or 
security interest in the establishment; 

c. Name and address of the manager of the establishment; 

d. The number of employees; 

e. Proposed provisions for security within and without the 
establishment ; 

f. The physical layout of the interior of the establishment. 

6.7.8 Any Adult Use Special Permit issued under this By-law shall lapse 
within one (1) year if substantial use thereof has not sooner 
commenced except for good cause or in the case of a permit for 
construction, if construction has not begun by such date except for 
good cause; excepting only any time required to pursue or await the 
determination of an appeal from the grant thereof. 

6.7.9 Invalidity: Any section of this By-law, or portion thereof, 
declared invalid shall not affect the validity or application of 
the remainder of the By-law. 

B. Add a new Section 3.5.18 to Classification of Business Uses as follows: 
3.5.18 Adult Uses - The uses defined in Section 6.7 of these By-laws. 

C. Amend (Section 3) Table I Principal Use Regulations as follows: 

(1) Add the following phrase under 3.5 Business Uses: 

3.5.18 Adult Uses - Only permitted in Adult Use District by SP. 

See Section 6.7. 

(2) Add the term "R" under the Site Plan Review column for 3.5.18 
Adult Uses. 

D. Amend Section 6.1 Nonconforming Uses and Structures by adding the following 
Section 6.1.5. 

6.1.5 Non-Applicability: Section 6.1 allowing non-conforming uses to 

continue shall not apply to adult uses as defined in Section 6.7 
hereof, all of which must comply in all respects with the 
provisions of Section 6.7. 

E. Amend Section 6.3.2 Prohibited Signs in All Districts by adding the 
following Section 6.3.2.4: 

6.3.2.4 Any sign that depicts, describes or relates to nudity or sexual 

conduct as defined in M.G.L., Chapter 272, section 31, and that is 
visible from the outside of the building. 

or do anything in relation thereto. 



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Motion by James Diorio, of the Planning Board, "I move that the town vote 
to amend the Zoning By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of 
Wilmington by taking the following actions: 

A. Add a new section 6.7 Adult Use District as follows: 



6.7.1 Purpose and Intent: It is the purpose and intent of this Section 

6.7 to address and mitigate the secondary effects of the Adult Uses 
referenced herein, since such secondary effects have been found by 
the Wilmington Planning Board, as a result of the studies relied 
upon by the Wilmington Planning Board and after other public input, 
to include increased crime, adverse impacts on public health, 
negative impact on retail business climate, and declining 
residential and commercial property values. The provisions of this 
Section have neither the purpose nor intent of imposing a 
limitation or restriction on freedom of expression as protected by 
the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Neither is 
it the purpose or intent of this Section to legalize the sale, 
rental, distribution, or exhibition of obscene or other illegal 
matter or materials. 



6.7.2 The Adult Use district is herein established as an overlay district 
and shall be superimposed on the other districts established by 
this By-law. Adult uses shall be prohibited at any other location 
in town. 

6.7.2.3 Boundaries: Boundaries of the Adult Use District are shown on the 
zoning map and include the following parcels as identified on the 
1996 Assessor's Map R-3: Parcels 25, 25A, 29, 29A, 29B, 29C, 39, 
44, 44A, 49, BOA, BOB, 401 and 402. 

6.7.3 Definitions: 

Adult Uses: An establishment having a substantial or significant 
portion of its business activity, stock in trade, or other 
materials for sale, rental, or display, which are distinguished or 
characterized by their emphasis on matter depicting, describing, or 
relating to sexual conduct as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, 
section 31, including but not limited to the following: 

6.7.3.1 Adult Bookstore: An establishment having as a substantial or 
significant portion of its stock in trade, books, magazines, and 
other matter which are distinguished or characterized by their 
emphasis depicting, describing or relating to sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.2 Adult Entertainment Club: An establishment which provides live 
entertainment for its patrons which includes the display of nudity 
as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.3 Adult Motion Picture Theater: An establishment used for presenting 
material distinguished by an emphasis on matter depicting, 
describing, or relating to sexual conduct or sexual excitement as 
defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.4 Adult Paraphernalia Store: An establishment having as a 
substantial or significant portion of its stock devices, objects, 
tools or toys which are distinguished or characterized by their 
association with sexual activity, including sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 

6.7.3.B Adult Video Store: An establishment having as a substantial or 

significant portion of its stock in trade videos, movies or other 
film materials which are distinguished or characterized by their 
emphasis depicting, describing, or relating to sexual conduct or 
sexual excitement, as defined in M.G.L. Chapter 272, section 31. 



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6.7.4 Substantial or Significant Portion: The term "substantial or 
significant portion" as used in 6.7.3 shall mean any of the 
following : 

a. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the business inventory or stock 
of merchandise for sale, rental, distribution, or exhibition 
during any period of time; or 

b. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the annual number of gross 
sales, rentals, or other business transactions; or 

c. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the annual gross business 
revenue ; or 

d. Twenty percent (20%) or more of the hours during which the 
establishment is open. 

6.7.5 Special Permit : 

No Adult Use shall be allowed except by a Special Permit granted by 
the Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall grant a Special 
Permit only upon the determination that the location and design are 
in harmony with its surroundings, that adequate safeguards exist 
through licensing or other means to assure on a continuing basis 
that activities therein will not be patently contrary to prevailing 
standards of adults in the community and will not involve minors in 
any way, and only if the use is found by the Board of Appeals to 
comply with the following minimum Special Permit criteria: 

6.7.5.1 Location: Lots containing an Adult Use may not be located: 

a. Within five hundred (500) feet of a boundary line of a 
residential zoning district; 

b. Within one thousand (1,000) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing a church, school, or library. 

c. Within five hundred (500) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing an establishment licensed under the provisions of 
Section 12 of Chapter 138 of the General Laws. 

d. Within five hundred (500) feet of a lot line of any lot 
containing any other Adult Use as defined herein. 

6.7.5.2 No Special Permit for an Adult Use shall be issued to any person 
convicted of violating the provisions of M.G.L., Chapter 119, 
section 63 or Chapter 272, section 28. 

6.7.5.3 The hours in which Adult Uses are open to the public shall be 
limited as follows: adult bookstore, adult paraphernalia store, 
adult video store or similar adult use between the hours of 9:00 
a.m. and 9:00 p.m., adult motion picture theater, adult 
entertainment club or similar adult use between the hours of 4:00 
p.m. and 12:00 midnight. 

6.7.5.4 Site Development Standards: 

a. Site Plan Review: No Special Permit for any Adult Use shall be 
issued without prior Site Plan Approval from the Planning Board. 

b. Dimensional Requirements: Any building or structure containing 
an Adult Use shall meet the setback requirements and other 
dimensional controls of the underlying district as specified in 
these By-laws. 



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c. Parking and Loading: On-site parking and loading shall be 
provided in accordance with the requirements set forth in 
Section 6.4.1.1 of these By-laws as pertains to retail and 
service business. All parking areas shall be illuminated and 
all lighting shall be contained on the property. 

d. Landscaping: As required under Site Plan Review. 

e. Signage: Any sign that depicts, describes or relates to nudity 
or sexual conduct as defined in M.G.L., Chapter 272, section 31, 
and that is visible from the outside of the building is 
prohibited. 



6.7.6 Any Adult Use in existence prior to the adoption of this Section 
6.7 shall apply for a Special Permit as specified in this Section 
6.7 within ninety (90) days following the adoption of Section 6.7. 

6.7.7 The application for a Special Permit for an Adult Use must include 
the following information: 



a. Name and address of the legal owner of the proposed 
establishment ; 

b. Name and address of the legal owner of the property; 

c. Name and address of all persons having a lawful, 
equity or security interest in the establishment; 

d. Name and address of the manager of the establishment; 



e . The number of employees ; 



f. Proposed provisions for security within and without the 
establishment ; 

g. The physical layout of the interior of the establishment. 

6.7.8 Any Adult Use Special Permit issued under this By-law shall lapse 
within one (1) year if substantial use thereof has not sooner 
commenced except for good cause or in the case of a permit for 
construction, if construction has not begun by such date except for 
good cause; excepting only any time required to pursue or await the 
determination of an appeal from the grant thereof . 

6.7.9 The provisions of this Section 6.7 shall only apply to adult uses 
as defined in this Section which are also defined in Section 9A of 

Chapter 4 OA of the General Laws. 

6.7.10 Invalidity: Any section of this By-law, or portion thereof, 
declared invalid shall not affect the validity or application of 
the remainder of the By-law. 

B. Add a new Section 3.5.18 to Classification of Business Uses as follows: 
3.5.18 Adult Uses - The uses defined in Section 6.7 of these Bylaws. 

C. Amend (Section 3) Table I Principal Use Regulations as follows: 

(1) Add the following phrase under 3.5 Business Uses: 

3.5.18 Adult Uses - Only permitted in Adult Use District by SP. 

See Section 6.7. 

(2) Add the term "R" under the Site Plan Review column for 3.5.18 
Adult Uses. 



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D. Amend Section 6.1 Nonconforming Uses and Structures by adding the following 
Section 6.1.5. 

6.1.5 Non-Applicability : Section 6.1 allowing non- conforming uses to 

continue shall not apply to adult uses as defined in Section 6.7 
hereof, all of which must comply in all respects with the 
provisions of Section 6.7. 

E. Amend Section 6.3.2 Prohibited Signs in All Districts by adding the 
following Section 6.3.2.4: 

6.3.2.4 Any sign that depicts, describes or relates to nudity or sexual 

conduct as defined in M.G.L., Chapter 272, section 31, and that is 
visible from the outside of the building. 

Article is the same as original warrant with these changes: 

6.7.4 d. - delete 

6.7.7 b . & c . - change wording 

6.7.9 change wording 

6.7.10 add 

Lynn Duncan, Planning Director explained to Town Meeting the need for this by- 
law. The Planning Board looked into many areas in the town. This seemed to 
be the best location, the northerly portion of Ballardvale Street near the 
Andover line, since access is from highways and not through residential areas. 
Adult uses still require special permit from the Board of Appeals. This by- 
law limits hours of operation and signs. Liquor licenses would come under the 
same restrictions and controls now in effect. Mrs. Roth, 30 Bay Street, owner 
of a video store with adult videos available had questions concerning their 
status. Town Manager answered questions, relative to do they need a Special 
Permit, can town come in and count their videos or look at their records, and 
are they bound by the hours limited to 4:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m. Answer is no 
to all questions. Town Counsel, Alan Altman stated the Attorney General will 
probably approve this article and it should withstand a court challenge, as to 
first amendment rights. Discussion was held about Camp Forty Acres, a Scout 
and children's camp in the area. 

Karen Metcalf, a member of the Planning Board and parent of a child, who has 
used the camp, stated that the site plan review process would deal with issues 
concerning the camp, and a fence could be required. The Zone is 12 00 feet 
from the camp, and there is no direct route. Many residents in the area spoke 
of their concerns . Finance Committee recommends unanimous approval . Planning 
Board recommends unanimous approval . This article is sponsored by the 
Planning Board. Its purpose is to control and regulate adult use businesses 
in order to minimize potential negative impacts. 

Mrs. Linehan made a motion to move the question. Motion voted unanimously. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Main motion seconded and so voted. 
2/3rds vote required. Yes 131 No 21. So voted. 

ARTICLE 6. (drawn as #8) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 7, Parcel 4 8B; or do anything in relation 
thereto. The Town Moderator read a letter from the petitioner asking to have 
this article withdrawn. 



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Motion by Town Manager Michael Caira to withdraw. Motion seconded and so 
voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 7. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington from the Conservation Commission to the 
Board of Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, being a certain parcel of vacant 
land, shown as Map 11, Parcel 34 on the town of Wilmington's Assessor maps, 
acquired by the Conservation Commission by vote of Article 30 of the 1968 Town 
Meeting, all in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, for the express 
and exclusive purpose of releasing a sewer easement to Sixth Realty Trust of 
Wilmington, Massachusetts, to construct, operate, maintain a sewer main and 
fixtures appurtenant thereto, upon, over, under and across a certain way known 
as Third Avenue as now laid out or as may be laid out in the future in the 
Town of Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, a copy of which plan 
entitled "Proposed Sewer Extension Plan and Profile, Third Avenue in 
Wilmington, MA," prepared by Marchionda & Associates, Inc., dated January 
1991, Revised April 29, 1991, is on file with the Conservation Commission and 
the Water and Sewer Department, subject to the approval of the Conservation 
Commission, said way as now laid out and shown on a plan entitled "Shawsheen 
Pines," Billerica - Wilmington, Massachusetts, Engineer, Harry F. Bryant & 
Son, Date: April, 1927, and recorded in Plan Book 50, Plan 61 at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Lowell, Massachusetts, and is contiguous to 
and abutting town-owned land shown as Block 15, Lots 20-29 inclusive, on said 
plan, provided however, that the care, custody, management and control of said 
parcel shall otherwise remain with the Conservation Commission and to 
authorize the Selectmen to release the sewer easement area, all in accordance 
with M.G.L. Chapter 30B and every other law relating thereto and to authorize 
the Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court for Legislative approval 
pursuant to Article 97 of the amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution; 
and after obtaining all required approvals, including the approval of the 
Secretary of Environmental Affairs, to transfer said sewer easement all in 
accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, and provided further 
that the costs and expenses of the Town of Wilmington relative to the 
aforesaid easement, recording, legislation and approvals shall be reimbursed 
to the town upon written request; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mark Nelson, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington from the Conservation Commission 
to the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, being a certain 
parcel of vacant land, shown as Map 11, Parcel 34 on the Town of 
Wilmington's Assessor maps, acquired by the Conservation Commission by 
vote of Article 30 of the 1968 Town Meeting, all in accordance with 
M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, for the express and exclusive purpose of 
releasing a sewer easement to Sixth Realty Trust of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, to construct, operate, maintain a sewer main and fixtures 
appurtenant thereto, upon, over, under and across a certain way known as 
Third Avenue as now laid out or as may be laid out in the future in the 
Town of Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, a copy of which plan 
entitled "Proposed Sewer Extension Plan and Profile, Third Avenue in 
Wilmington, MA.", prepared by Marchionda & Associates, Inc., dated 
January 1991, Revised April 29, 1991, is on file with the Conservation 
Commission and the Water and Sewer Department, subject to the approval of 
the Conservation Commission, said way as now laid out and shown on a plan 
entitled "Shawsheen Pines", Billerica - Wilmington, Massachusetts, 
Engineer, Harry F. Bryant & Son, Date: April, 1927, and recorded in Plan 
Book 50, Plan 61 at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Lowell, 
Massachusetts, and is contiguous to and abutting town-owned land shown as 
Block 15, Lots 20-29 inclusive, on said plan, provided however, that the 
care, custody, management and control of said parcel shall otherwise 
remain with the Conservation Commission and to authorize the Selectmen to 
release the sewer easement area, all in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B and every other law relating thereto and to authorize the Selectmen 
to petition the Great and General Court for Legislative approval pursuant 
to Article 97 of the amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution: and 



-136- 



after obtaining all required approvals, including the approval of the 
Secretary of Environmental Affairs, to transfer said sewer easement all 
in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, and provided 
further that the costs and expenses of the Town of Wilmington relative to 
the aforesaid easement, recording, legislation and approvals shall be 
reimbursed to the town upon written request; or do anything in relation 
thereto . " 

Planning Board and Conservation Commission recommends approval . Finance 
Committee recommends disapproval. Mark Nelson, local developer spoke about 
this article. Approval will allow him to construct a sewer main at no cost to 
the town, so that he can build on family owned land on Dorchester Street. All 
abutters adjacent to Third Avenue have released easements to allow for 1,035 
feet of sewer main construction. This will benefit the neighborhood for the 
future as other homeowners could utilize this service if any of their septic 
systems fail. Conservation Commission recommends approval. Planning Board 
recommends approval because the article is supported by the Conservation 
Commission, as this approach will eliminate wetlands impact. Finance 
Committee recommends disapproval based on not wanting to encourage more 
building. Article needs 2/3rds vote. Yes 88 No 16. So voted. 

ARTICLE 8. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that Paul L. 
Boudreau be allowed to take the civil service Fire Department entrance 
examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the Wilmington Fire Department 
and/or be appointed as a member of the Fire Department of the Town of 
Wilmington notwithstanding that he is more than thirty-two years old; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Paul Boudreau, High Street, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to 
authorize that Paul L. Boudreau be allowed to take the civil service Fire 
Department entrance examination for the position of Fire Fighter in the 
Wilmington Fire Department and/or be appointed as a member of the Fire 
Department of the Town of Wilmington notwithstanding that he is more than 
thirty-two years old; or do anything in relation thereto." 

He wishes to be able to take the civil service test, and have a chance to go 
on the Fire Department here in town. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

Motion to adjourn made at 10:15 p.m. Total attendance was one hundred seventy 
four (174) and fifteen (15) non-voters. 

WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 5, 1996 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections 
to vote at the West Intermediate School (Precincts 1 & 2) , the Wildwood School 
(Precincts 3 & 4) , and the Town Hall (Precincts 5 & 6) on Tuesday, the Fifth 
day of November, 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., for the following purpose: 
Electors of President and Vice President; United States Senator for the 
Commonwealth; Representative in Congress for the Sixth Congressional District; 
Councillor for the Fifth Councillor District; Senator in General Court for the 
First Essex and Middlesex District; Representative in General Court for the 
Twentieth Middlesex District; Representative in General Court for the Twenty- 
First Middlesex District; Representative in General Court for the Twenty-Third 
Middlesex District; Register of Probate for Middlesex County; County Treasurer 
for Middlesex County; County Commissioners (Two) for Middlesex County; and 
Sheriff for Middlesex County. 



-137- 



BALLOT QUESTION 



Question 1: Changing the Trapping and Hunting Laws. 
Yes No 



The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by Town Clerk, Kathleen Scanlon at the West 
Intermediate School, Assistant Town Clerk, Carolyn Kenney at the Wildwood 
School, and Police Officer Charles Fiore, at the Town Hall. The zero sheets 
were removed from the machines to show all interested parties that they were 
clear. 

Election day, November 5, 1996 was a very busy day for all three polling 
places with record numbers turning out to vote. A total of 9,569 plus two 
federal ballots were cast. This included 445 absentee ballots which 
represents 75% of our 12,812 registered voters. Voters were most patient and 
at times the lines were long. However, with the additional polling place and 
the excellent work done by Election Workers and Police Officers in regard to 
parking, all went very smoothly. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. and everyone within the buildings voted. 
The declaration of the vote was made at 11:00 p.m. for the following: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 

Browne and Jorgensen - Libertarian 66 

Clinton and Gore - Democratic 5547 

Dole and Kemp - Republican 2855 

Hagelin and Tompkins - Natural Law Party 18 

Moorehead and Lariva - Workers World Party 4 

Perot and Choate - Reform Party 1004 

Others 11 

Blanks 66 

Total 9571 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

John F. Kerry - Democratic 4442 

William F. Weld - Republican 4732 

Susan C. Gallagher- Conservative 377 

Robert C. Stowe - Natural Law Party 19 

Blanks 67 

Total 9571 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - SIXTH DISTRICT 

Peter G. Torkildsen - Republican 3976 

John F. Tierney - Democratic 4551 

Randal C. Fritz - Conservative 99 

Benjamin A. Gatchell - Independent 86 

Martin J. McNulty - Independent 127 

Orrin Smith 71 

Blanks 661 

Total 9571 

COUNCILLOR - FIFTH DISTRICT 

Patricia Dowling - Democratic 5200 

Kevin J. Leach - Republican 2659 

Blanks 1712 

Total 9571 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT - FIRST ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

Bruce E. Tarr - Republican 4423 

Klaus Kubierschky - Democratic 3451 

Blanks 1697 

Total 9571 



-138- 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - TWENTIETH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 



James R. Miceli - Democratic 5621 

Al Meegan - Republican 1927 

Blanks 432 

Total 7980 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - TWENTY-THIRD MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

George L. Judge, Jr. - Republican 63 

Charles A. Murphy - Democratic 751 

Blanks 210 

Total 1591 

REGISTER OF PROBATE - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

Donna M. Lambert - Republican 3671 

Robert B. Antonelli - Democratic 4261 

Blanks 1639 

Total 9571 

COUNTY TREASURER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

James E. Fahey, Jr. - Democratic 624 7 

Blanks 3324 

Total 95 71 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY - VOTE FOR TWO 

Thomas J. Larkin - Democratic 42 3 5 

Anthony G. Marino - Democratic 3136 

Edward J. Sullivan - Democratic 3205 

Jerry Vengrow - Republican 1273 

Blanks 7293 

Total 19142 

SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

Brad Bailey - Republican 3953 

James V. DiPaola - Democratic 4463 

Blanks 1155 

Total 9571 



Question 1: 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 

taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 1, 1996? 

Yes 414 7 

No 2554 

Blanks 2870 

Total 9571 



DISTRICT WIDE RECOUNT 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (6TH DISTRICT) 
NOVEMBER 26, 1996 

In the matter of the district wide recount, for Representative in Congress 
(6th District) . This procedure was held in the Town of Wilmington on Tuesday, 
November 26, 1996 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 9 at the Town Hall. 

All was made ready according to Chapter 54, Sections 135, 135A of the General 
Laws. The Board of Registrars, Town Clerk, Assistant Town Clerk, and seven 
election workers were used for the process. The Town Counsel, a Voting 
Machine Technician and a Police Officer were also present. Twenty- five 
observers were present representing both candidates and members of the press. 



-139- 



i 

The results were as follows: i; 



Peter G. Torkildsen - Republican 3976 

John F. Tierney - Democratic 4551 

Randal C. Fritz - Conservative 99 

Benjamin A. Gatchell - Independent 86 

Martin J. McNulty - Independent 127 

Orrin Smith - Natural Law Party 73 

Blanks 659 

Total 9571 



i 

t 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Tovm Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the Town of 
Wilmington for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1996, are hereby submitted. 
This report was prepared by the Office of the Town Accountant. Responsibility 
for the accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the 
presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the Town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are 
accurate in all material respects and are reported in a manner designed to 
present fairly the financial position and results of operations of the various 
funds and account groups of the government. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Michael Morfis 
Town Accountant 




-141- 



TOWN OP WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Groups 143 

Notes to Financial Statements 144 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund I 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 148 

Schedule of Budgetary Basis Statement of Revenues and I 
Expenditures Budget and Actual - General Fund 150 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet - Special Revenue 
Accounts 151 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - Special Revenue Accounts 152 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity - General Fund 154 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department 
Fund 159 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Project Fund 160 | 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 161 | 

Schedule of Trust Funds 162 



I 

-142- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30, 1996 



ASSETS 

CASH 

RECEIVABLES : 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESS.PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 



GENERAL 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



2,681,994.10 1,422,927.44 

870,438.09 

(602,348.75) 
208,592.43 

69,576.51 
599,554.61 

97,695.31 
309,438 . 50 

127,487.68 430,284.58 
549,086.49 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



TRUST & 
AGENCY 



311,202.40 1,316,119.92 



LONG-TERM 
DEBT 



TOTAL 
(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 

5,732,243.86 

870,438.09 

(602,348.75) 
208, 592 .43 

69, 576 . 51 
599, 554 . 61 

97, 695.31 
309,438.50 
557, 772 . 26 
549, 086 .49 



3,087,800.00 3,087,800.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



4,362,428.48 2,402,298.51 311,202.40 1,316,119.92 3,087,800.00 11,479,849.31 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 626,023.08 81,646.53 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 870,438.09 

OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 1,412,345.04 979,371.07 
NOTES PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 7,353.88 



14,080.82 721,750.43 

870,438.09 
2, 391, 716 .11 
3,087,800.00 3,087,800.00 
7, 353 .88 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



2,916,160.09 1,061,017.60 



0.00 14,080.82 3,087,800.00 7,079,058.51 



FUND BALANCE: 

RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 685,418.37 76,759.29 

RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 626,650.01 
RES. FOR DEF. TEACHERS (532,636.00) 
UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 1,293,486.02 637,871.61 



311,202.40 1,051,562.21 



250,476.89 



762, 177 . 66 
1, 989, 414 . 62 
(532, 636 . 00) 
2,181,834.52 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



1,446,268.39 1,341,280.91 311,202.40 1,302,039.10 



0.00 4,400,790.80 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



4,362,428.48 2,402,298.51 311,202.40 1,316,119.92 3,087,800.00 11,479,849.31 



-143- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1996 



1 . Siiinmarv of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the Town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for 
local governmental units except as indicated in Note 2. The following 
is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several funds 
and one account group in order to comply with the limitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
Town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating 
fund of the Town. It is used to account for all financial 
resources except those required to be accounted for in another 
fund. 

Special Revenue Funds - Special revenue funds are used to 
account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other than 
expendable trust or major capital projects) that are legally 
restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to 
account for financial resources to be used for the acquistion or 
construction of major capital facilities (other than those 
financed by trust funds) . 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic measurements 
of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order 
to demonstrate maintenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in essentially the same manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of 
operations . 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities 
expected to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in 
the general long-term debt group of accounts. This account group 
is not a fund. It is only concerned with the measurement of 
financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
incurred. 



-144- 



Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they 
become available. Available means then due or past due and 
receivable within the current period or expected to be collected 
soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities o£ the 
current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. Receipts during the sixty days immediately 
following the close of the fiscal year are also recognized as 
available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual requirements of 
the niimerous individual progreuns are used as guidance. There are, 
however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, monies 
must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any 
eunounts will be paid to the Town. Therefore, revenues are 
recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, 
monies are virtually vinrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and 
are usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to 
accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a 
cash disbursement basis. In addition, as required by 
Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen 
days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and 
expenses as of June 3 0th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, 
as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenues that 
are measurable but not available have been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 30th. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase 
orders, contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of 
funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of the 
applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. Open 
encumbrances at year-end are reported as reservations of fund 
balances. Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or 
liabilities . 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are 
recorded as expenditures when purchased (purchase method) . 

General fixed assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental f vmds . The Town does not 
capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a general fixed 
asset account group which is consistent with the practice of many 
mvinicipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. Total Coliimns 

Total colvimns on the combined statements are captioned 
"Memorandum Only" to indicate that they are presented only to 
facilitate financial analysis. Data in these columns do not 
present financial position, results of operations or changes in 
financial position in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles. Such data is not comparable to a 
consolidation since interfvind eliminations have not been made. 

D. Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Contributory 
Retirement System, a single employer plan, established under 
Chapter 32 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Substantially all full-time and some part-time 
employees of the Town, except teachers and certain administrative 

-145- 



personnel employed by the School Department, participate in the 
System. Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as "retirement 
allowance", include both an annuity portion, fxinded principally 
from amoiints contributed by the participants, and a pension 
portion funded by the Tovm. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of employment. 
The employer contribution by the Town as determined by the 
County's actuarial valuation normal cost plus the amortization of 
the original vmfunded actuarial liedsllity. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. 
Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, and therefore, the Town does not contribute to 
the plan. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the Town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The Town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P, 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 



included in the Town of 



A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with 
Chapter 32 of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
(seen note ID) . 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases are made rather than 
being capitalized in a general fixed asset group of 
accounts . 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at time of 
purchase . 

Long-term Debt 

State law permits the Town to authorize indebtedness up to a 
limit of 5% of its equalized valuation. Debt issued in accordance 
with this State Law is designated as being ' inside the debt 
limit' . In addition, however, a Town may authorize debt in excess 
of that limit for specific purposes. Such debt when issued, is 
designated as being 'outside the debt limit'. The following 
summarizes the Annual Debt Service requirements as of June 30, 
1996. 



General Obligation Bonds 
Year ending June 30, 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 

2001 



Principal 


Interest 


Total 


1,385,700 


153,528 


1,539,228 


670,700 


87,316 


758, 016 


440,700 


53,396 


494, 096 


365,700 


27,983 


393,683 


225.000 


7,706 


232.706 


3,087,800 


329,929 


3,417,729 



146- 



As of June 30, 1996, the Town had authorized and unissued 
debt of $1,312,500. The Town retired $187,500 on August 29, 1996, 
the Bond Anticipation Note was then retired, a General Obligation 
Bond was issued on August 29, 1996 (see below) . 



ending June 30, 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


1998 


225,000 


77, 175 


302,175 


1999 


225,000 


38,288 


263,588 


2000 


225,000 


27,563 


252,563 


2001 


225,000 


16,537 


241,537 


2002 


225,000 


5.512 


230,512 




1,125,000 


165,375 


1,290,375 



As of June 30th, 1996, the Town had additional authorized 
and unissued debt totaling $1,985,000. 



-147 - 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 

Fiduciary 

Fund Types Total 





General 




Special 




Capital 




Expendable 


(Memorandum 








Revenue 




Projects 


Trust 




Only) 




REVENUES : 






















Qgi^g]-a3_ pjTopeirty Taxes 


25 , 579 , 296 


49 














25 , 579 , 296 


.49 


Tax Liens 


310,950 


90 


101, 204 


4 3 










4 12 , 155 


. 33 


Special Assessments 


68 , 328 


65 


4,170 


14 










72, 498 


. 79 


Exc ise 


1 , 584 ,071 


60 














1,584,071 


. 60 


Penalties 


176, 349 


39 














176, 349 


. 39 


Licenses and Permits 


290, 391 


91 










21, 541 


35 


311, 933 


. 26 


Intergovernmental 


4 , 530, 053 


97 


837 , 922 


71 






825 


. 90 


5, 368, 802 


. 58 


Charges for Services 


1, 927,270 


75 


4 , 679 , 944 


34 






254,412 


54 


6, 861, 627 


.63 


Fines 


171,550 


00 














171,550 


00 


Fees 


33,361 


11 














33, 361 


11 


Interest Earnings 


159 ,491 


59 


10,813 


86 






30, 182 


03 


200,487 


48 


Other 


652 , 949 


16 


274 , 394 


43 






817,496 


15 


1, 744 , 839 


74 


Total Revenues 


35,484, 065 


52 


5, 908,449 


91 





00 


1, 124 , 457 


97 


42, 516, 973 


40 


EXPENDITURES: 






















General Government 


987, 511 


29 


1, 592 


13 






699, 940 


55 


1, 689, 043 


97 


Public Safety 


4 , 054 ,407 


80 


314, 275 


01 






198, 889 


01 


4 , 567, 571 


82 


Human Services 


489, 622 


69 


29, 854 


88 






9,822 


31 


529,2 99 


88 


Public Works 


3, 677, 506 


18 


2, 070, 956 


06 


45,479 


97 


500 


00 


5 , 794 , 442 


21 


r^nmmi inif"\/ r)^\/^1 or^m^n f" 


403 027 


72 


37 862 


6 8 










440, 890 


40 


Dili TiHin^ Mainf*OT^aTi(^i3 
OLl J. J. U ±i 1^ l*la J. J i L. lclllv.>C 


1 964 42 9 


68 


20 244 


50 






48, 164 


55 


2, 032, 838 


73 


Education 


16, 087, 099 


69 


1,444, 835 


35 






2, 669 


12 


17, 534, 604 


16 


Recreation 


88, 557 


85 


347,230 


01 










4 3 5,787 


86 


Veterans ' Services 


1 c fid 7 


i. 














16, 047 


1 3 


Debt and Interest 


2, 049, 130 


50 














2, 04 9, 130 


50 


Unclassified 


2,484,316 


86 


4 , 877 


16 






10, 927 


61 


2, 500, 121 


63 


Statutory Charges 


2,776,471 


79 














2,776,471 


79 


Capital Outlay 


292, 165 


50 


257, 572 


07 










549, 737 


57 


Warrant Articles 


16, 130 


12 


9, 534 


42 










25, 664 


54 


Total Expenditures 


35, 386,424 


80 


4, 538, 834 


27 


45,479. 


97 


970, 913 . 


15 


40, 941, 652 


19 


Excess (deficiency) of 






















Revenues over Expenditures 


97, 640 


72 


1, 369, 615 


64 


(45,479. 


97) 


153 , 544 


82 


1, 575, 321 . 


21 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES & USES: 






















Operating Transfers In 


1,393,491 


92 














1, 393,491 . 


92 


Operating Transfers Out 






(1,365,489 


00) 


(13, 002 . 


92) 


(15, 000 . 


00) 


(1,393,491. 


92) 


Total Other Financing 






















Sources & Uses 


1, 393,491 


92 


(1, 365,489 


00) 


(13,002. 


92) 


(15, 000. 


00) 


0. 


00 



-143- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF BUDGETARY BASIS STATEMENT OF 
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES BUDGET AND ACTUAL - GENERAL FUND 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



REVENUES: 

General Property Taxes 
Special Assessments 
Excise 
Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges (or Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Other 

Total Revenues 



General 
Budget 

26,383,810.14 
9,000.00 
1,372,998.00 
250,000.00 
301,000.00 
4,536,612.00 
1,801,518.00 
180,000.00 
55,000.00 
95,000.00 
525,800.00 



General 
Actual 

26,167,455.87 
9,000.93 
1,584,071.60 
176,349.39 
290,391.91 
4,530,053.97 
2,015,955.80 
171,550.00 
33,361.11 
159,491.59 
529,122.64 



General 
Variance 

(216.354.27) 
0.93 
211,073.60 
(73,650.61) 
(10,608.09) 
(6,558.03) 
214,437.80 
(8,450.00) 
(21,638.89) 
64,491.59 
3,322.64 



35.510,738.14 35,666,804 81 



156,066.67 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES: 

Operating Transfers 

Total Other Financing Sources 



1,393,491.92 
1.393,491.92 



1,393,491.92 
1,393,491.92 



0.00 
0.00 



Total Revenue and Other 
Financing Sources 



36,904.230.06 37.060.296.73 



156,066.67 



EXPENDITURES: 

General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Worl<s 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Warrant Articles 

Total Expenditures 



1 


013,489 37 


1.009.537.56 


3.951.81 


4 


019.249.18 


4.010.063.52 


9.185 66 




491,294.83 


487.796.34 


3.498 49 


3 


710.256.78 


3.677.613.70 


32.643 08 




409.768.40 


403.505.45 


6.262.95 


1 


955.237.00 


1.940.229.02 


15.007 98 


16 


186,677.00 


16.183.079.00 


3.598.00 




89,174.39 


88,557.85 


616.54 




19,600.04 


16.047.13 


3,552.91 


2 


060,374.00 


2,049.130.50 


11.243.50 


3 


146.403.52 


2.659.196.71 


487.206.81 


3 


448.145.30 


3.468.807.59 


(20,662,29) 




294.449.00 


267,028.23 


27.420.77 




60.111.25 


58.130.12 


1.981.13 


36,904.230.06 


36.318.722.72 


585.507.34 



Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 



0.00 



741.574.01 



-150- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JXTOE 30, 1996 



ASSETS 



GRANTS 



RESERVED FOR REVOLVING 
GIFTS APPROPRIATION FUNDS 



WATER 



TOTAL 
(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESSrPROV FOR ABATES 
i EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 



(341,085.27) 13,805.60 557,776.39 217,858.07 974,572.65 1,422,927.44 



430,284.58 



549,086.49 



430, 284 . 58 
549, 086 .49 



TOTAL ASSETS 



208,001.22 13,805.60 557,776.39 217,858.07 1,404,857.23 2,402,298.51 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 
DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 549,086.49 
NOTES PAYABLE 
PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 



12,880.30 187.50 



13,338.65 55,240.08 81,646.53 



430,284.58 979,371.07 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



561,966.79 187.50 



0.00 13,338.65 485,524.66 1,061,017.60 



FUND BALANCE: 

RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 76,759.29 76,759.29 

RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 52,206.04 8,400.83 371,561.93 194,481.21 626,650.01 

RES. FOR DEF. TEACHERS 

UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED (406,171.61) 5,217.27 186,214.46 10,038.21 842,573.28 637,871.61 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



(353,965.57) 13,618.10 557,776.39 204,519.42 919,332.57 1,341,280.91 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



208,001.22 13,805.60 557,776.39 217,858.07 1,404,857.23 2,402,298.51 



-151- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



Grants 



Gifts Reserved for Revolving 

Appropriation Funds 



Water 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



REVENUES : 

General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Other 

Total Revenues 



753,640.46 
5,869.00 



1, 722 .28 
7, 113 . 00 



0.64 

4,140.00 



9, 090 . 94 
200, 169 . 90 



101, 204 .43 
4,170.14 



101, 204 .43 
4 , 170 . 14 



84,282.25 837,922.71 
1,433,311.04 3,240,764.30 4,679,944.34 



57, 378 . 65 



5, 592 . 1 



10, 813 .86 
274,394 .43 



768,344.74 



4,140.64 209,260.84 1,574,971.94 3,351,731.75 5,908,449.91 



EXPENDITURES : 

General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Works 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Warrant Articles 

Total Expenditures 



1,592.13 
285,429.07 

25,141.60 
627,276.24 

37, 862 .68 

392,856.22 



9, 534 .42 



187.50 
2,100.00 



19,530.37 



1, 592 . 13 

28,658.44 314,275.01 
2,613.28 29,854.88 
3.42 1,424,146.03 2,070,956.06 
37, 862 . 68 

20,244.50 20,244.50 
1,051,979.13 1,444,835.35 
347,230.01 347,230.01 



4 , 877 .16 4 , 877 . 16 

257,572.07 257,572.07 
9, 534 .42 



1,379,692.36 



2,287.50 19,530.37 1,450,728.78 1,686,595.26 4,538,834.27 



Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES & USES: 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 

Total Other Financing 
Sources & Uses 



(611,347.62) 



0.00 



1,853.14 189,730.47 124,243.16 1,665,136.49 1,369,615.64 



(75,000.00) 



0.00 (75,000.00) 



0.00 

(1,290,489.00) (1,365,489.00) 



0.00 (1,290,489.00) (1,365,489.00) 



-152- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1996 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 




AMT CFWD TO 








FY 96 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


FY 97 FROM 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


BALANCE 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 














OOlCOll 1 iCi I 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,600.00 


1,689.11 


1,689.11 


0.00 


0,00 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


0.00 


7.350.00 


12.350.00 


11.772.45 


377.96 


199.59 






0.00 


8,950.00 


14.039.11 


13,461.56 


377.96 


199.59 


■ 

ciGCtions 




0.00 


10,713.00 


10,713.00 


9,930.73 


0.00 


782.27 




Constable 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 




Expenses 


150.00 


2.950.00 


2,950.00 


3,087.72 


0.00 


12.28 






150 00 


13,763.00 


13,763.00 


13,118.45 


0.00 


794.55 




Salaries 


0.00 


1 ,600.00 


1 ,600.00 


1 ,600.00 


0.00 


0.00 


r\cy loll dl o 




0.00 


4,300.00 


4,300.00 


4,113.77 


80.55 


105 68 


i\cy loll al o 


Furnish & Ec^uip. 


0.00 


165.00 


165.00 


129.05 


0.00 


35.95 






0.00 


6,065.00 


6,065.00 


5,842.82 


80.55 


141.63 


r illdllUc WUillill. 


^alariA^ 


0.00 


1 ,200.00 


1,200.00 


438.45 


0.00 


761 .55 


Fin3nc6 Comm. 


t ApCl loCo 


0.00 


6.056.00 


6.056.00 


5.896.00 


0.00 


160.00 






0.00 


7,256.00 


7,256.00 


6,334.45 


00 


921.55 


Town Manager 


Sal-Town Manager 


0.00 


79,181.00 


79,181.44 


79,181.44 


0.00 


0.00 




Sal. Other 


0.00 


196,988.00 


202,036.23 


202,036.23 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


0.00 


46,425.00 


46,425.00 


45,654.32 


0.00 


770.68 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


14.500.00 


14.500.00 


6.592.00 


7.822.25 


85.75 






0.00 


337,094.00 


342,142.67 


333,463.99 


7,822.25 


856.43 


Trt\A/n Af^pm infant 

1 UWII nOUUUillalll 


Sal-Town Accountant 


0.00 


57,297.00 


57,297 23 


57,297.23 


0.00 


0.00 


Tf^^Aln Af^f^oi intent 
1 UWll nl^LrUUI lldl 11 


Sal Other 

well. Wll Id 


0.00 


61,050.00 


65,191.91 


65,191.91 


0.00 


0.00 


1 UWI) rAUUUUIIldlll 


Fvn^n^p^ 


0.00 


2.020.00 


2.020.00 


1 ,564.69 


0.00 


455.31 






0.00 


120,367.00 


124,509.14 


124,053.83 


0.00 


45531 


Treas/Collector 


Sal-Treas/Collector 


0.00 


57,297.00 


57,297 24 


57,297.24 


0.00 


0.00 


1 ICdo/^UIlclylUI 


Sal Other 


0.00 


87,356.00 


93,635.08 


93,635 08 


000 


00 


Treas/Collector 


Expenses 


0.00 


26.850.00 


26,850.00 


26.850.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


171,503.00 


177,782.32 


177,782.32 


0.00 


000 


I UWll ^^ICI R 


OdI 1 UWll WlCIK 


0.00 


45,727.00 


45,727.24 


45,727.24 


0.00 


00 


Town Clerk 


OdI. WIIICI 


0.00 


40,469.00 


41,954 64 


41 ,954.64 


0.00 


000 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


0.00 


2.100.00 


2,100.00 


1.639.99 


419.28 


40.73 






0.00 


88,296 00 


89,781.88 


89,321.87 


419.28 


40 73 


Assessors 


Sal-Prin. Assessor 


0.00 


60,079.00 


60,079.25 


60,079.25 


0.00 


00 


Assessors 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


56,836.00 


59,170.96 


59.170.96 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Expenses 


348.97 


50,600.00 


50,600.00 


37,123.77 


13,825.20 


0.00 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


2.000.00 


2.000.00 


2,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 






348.97 


169,515.00 


171,850.21 


158,373.98 


13,825.20 


0.00 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


0.00 


6S 000 00 

U<J,UUU .\J\J 


65 000 04 


65 000 04 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


65,000.00 


65,000.04 


65,000.04 


0.00 


0.00 


Permanent BIdg Com. 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,200.00 


1 ,200.00 


735.84 


0.00 


464.16 


Permanent BIdg Com. 


Expenses 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


22.14 


0.00 


77.86 






0.00 


1,300.00 


1 .300.00 


757.98 


0.00 


542.02 


General Government 


Subtotal 


498.97 


989,109.00 


1,013,489.37 


987,511.29 


22,525.24 


3,951.81 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 














Police 


Sal.-Chief 


0.00 


74,618.00 


74,905 39 


74.905.39 


000 


000 


Police 


Sal.-Dep. Chief 


0.00 


59,235.00 


59,462 60 


59.462.60 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Lieut. 


000 


100,057.00 


106,041.72 


106,041.72 


0.00 


0.00 



-154- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1996 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 




AMT CFWD TO 








FY 96 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


FY 97 FROM 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


BALANCE 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


257,856.00 


281 ,026.54 


281,026.54 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal .-Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,061,608.00 


1,102,788.35 


1,102,788.35 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Clerical 


0.00 


62,122.00 


70,910.55 


70,910.55 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal -Fill In Costs 


0.00 


226,110.00 


247,817.85 


247,817.85 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Pd.Holidays 


000 


67,565.00 


68,743.71 


68,743.71 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Specialist 


0.00 


10,200.00 


10,275.00 


10,275.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal-Incentive 


0.00 


36,800.00 


36,800 00 


36,800.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal -Night Diff 


0.00 


32,760.00 


32,925 00 


32,925 00 


0.00 


000 


Police 


Expenses 


7,105.28 


135,035.00 


135,035.00 


141,979.96 


0.00 


160 32 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


13,650.00 


13,650.00 


10,307.25 


0.00 


3,342.75 


Police 


Furnish & Equip. 


36.588.00 


0.00 


0.00 


36,588 00 


0.00 


OOP 






43,693.28 


2,137,616.00 


2,240,381.71 


2,280,571.92 


0.00 


3,503.07 


Fire Dept. 


Sal-Chief 


0.00 


62,871.00 


62,871.00 


62,870.68 


0.00 


0.32 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Dep. Chief 


0.00 


51 ,953.00 


54,853.76 


54,853.76 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal-Lieut. 


0.00 


212,237.00 


226,030.07 


226,030.07 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal-Privates 


0.00 


893,413.00 


939,192.39 


939,192.39 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


54,896.00 


54,896.00 


54,440.16 


0.00 


455.84 


Fire Dept. 


Sal -Overtime Costs 


0.00 


150,000.00 


170,074.98 


170,074.98 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Pd.Holidays 


0.00 


64,537.00 


67,309.47 


67,309.47 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-lncentive/EMT 


208.00 


61,600.00 


61,600.00 


60,180.52 


0.00 


1,627.48 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-O.T. Fire Alarm 


0.00 


10,545.00 


10,545.00 


9.921.33 


0.00 


623.67 


Fire Dept. 


Expenses 


0.00 


59,100.00 


60,421.00 


60,421.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


15,121.00 


15,896 80 


15,896.80 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


27.000.00 


27.000.00 


27.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 






208.00 


1,663,273.00 


1 ,750,690.47 


1,748,191.16 


0.00 


2,707.31 


Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


21,577.00 


21,577.00 


21,576.88 


0.00 


0.12 


Animal Control 


Cont. Services 


443.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


3,518.89 


0.00 


2,924.11 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


600.00 


600.00 


548.95 


0.00 


51.05 






443.00 


28.177.00 


28.177.00 


25,644.72 


0.00 


2.975.28 


Prot Persons & Prop. Subtotal 


44,344.28 


3,829,066.00 


4,019,249.18 


4,054,407.80 


0.00 


9,185.66 


PUBLIC WORKS: 
















Engineering Div. 


Salaries 


0.00 


110,072.00 


110,072.00 


97,288.51 


0.00 


12,783.49 


Engineering Div 


Sal. Part Time 


0.00 


36,568.00 


36,568.00 


36,568.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Engineering Div. 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,500.00 


2.500.00 


2.500.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


149,140.00 


149,140.00 


136,356.51 


0.00 


12,783.49 


Highway Division 


Sal-D.P.W Super. 


0.00 


74,618.00 


74,618.44 


74,618.44 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


786,21900 


786,219.00 


785,153.39 


0.00 


1,065.61 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


1 ,605.00 


141,390.00 


141,390.00 


129,797.51 


12,926.03 


271.46 


Highway Division 


Rd. Mach. Exp. 


0.00 


62,000.00 


62,000.00 


61 ,940.32 


0.00 


59.68 


Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 


3,383.15 


99,651.00 


99,651 .00 


103,034.15 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Drainage Projects 


0.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


14,990.62 


0.00 


9.38 


Highway Division 


Public St. Lights 


17,092.59 


200,704 00 


200,704.00 


197,806.80 


19,989 79 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Chapter 90M 


26,980.84 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


26,980.84 


0.00 


HighvTay Division 


Chapter 81M 


19,039.89 


60,796.00 


60,796.00 


55,567.53 


24,268.36 


000 


Highvt/ay Division 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


21.700.00 


21.700.00 


21.626.00 


000 


74 00 






68,101.47 


1,462,078.00 


1,462,078.44 


1,444,534.76 


84,165.02 


1,480 13 


Snow & Ice Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


119,635.00 


119,635.00 


119.635.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Snow & Ice Control 


Expenses 


8.765.00 


182.911.00 


302.911.00 


299.963.59 


0.00 


11.712 41 






8,765.00 


302,546.00 


422,546.00 


419,598.59 


0.00 


11,712.41 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


5.215.40 


1.292.866.00 


1,292.866.00 


1,295.853.82 


0.00 


2.227 58 






5,215.40 


1,292,866 00 


1,292,866.00 


1,295,853.82 


0.00 


2,227.58 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1996 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 




AMT CFWD TO 








FY 96 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


FY 97 FROM 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


BALANCE 


Tree Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


81,100.00 


81,177.96 


81 177.96 


n nn 


n no 


Tree Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


8.895.00 


8.895.00 


7.418.72 


0.00 


1.476.28 






0.00 


89,995.00 


90,072.96 


88.596 68 


0.00 


1,476 28 


Parks & Grounds Div. 


Salaries 


0.00 


133,555.00 


139,034.77 


139,034.77 


0.00 


0.00 


Parks & Grounds Div. 


Expenses 


0.00 


30.353.00 


30.353.00 


30,353.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


163,908.00 


169,387.77 


169,387 77 


0.00 


0.00 


Cemetery Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


103,845.00 


109,440.61 


109,440.61 


00 


0.00 


Cennetery Division 


Expenses 


14.440.60 


14.725.00 


14,725.00 


13.737.44 


12.464.97 


2,963.19 






14.440.60 


118.570.00 


124.165.61 


123.178.05 


12,464.97 


2.963.19 


Public Works Subtotal 


96,522.47 


3,579,103.00 


3,710,256.78 


3,677,506.18 


96,629 99 


32,643 08 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 














Board of Health 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


50,554.00 


50,554.00 


50,553.89 


0.00 


0.11 


Board of Health 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


84,935 00 


88,24061 


88,24061 


0.00 


0.00 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


658.70 


6,100.00 


6,100.00 


6,528.73 


0.00 


229.97 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


14,581.00 


14,581 00 


13,365.88 


1,215.08 


0.04 


Board of Health 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


800.00 


800.00 


781.15 


OOP 


1885 






658.70 


156,970 00 


160,27561 


159,470.26 


1,215.08 


24897 


Sealer/Wght & Meas. 


Salaries 


0.00 


3,780.00 


3,780.00 


3,780 00 


0.00 


00 


Sealer/Wght & Meas. 


Expenses 


0.00 


80.00 


80.00 


0.00 


0.00 


80 00 






0.00 


3,860.00 


3,860.00 


3,780.00 


0.00 


80 00 


Planning/Conserv. 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


51,895.00 


51,895.00 


50,112 00 


000 


1.783 00 


Planning/Conserv. 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


84,146.00 


84,146 00 


82,551 11 


0.00 


1 ,594.89 


Planning/Conserv. 


Expenses 


0.00 


10.190.00 


10,190.00 


7.319.05 


415 00 


2.455.95 






0.00 


146,231 00 


146,231 00 


139,982 16 


415 00 


5.833 84 


BIdg. Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


39,198 00 


39,198.00 


39,197 60 


0.00 


040 


BIdg. Inspector 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


57,099.00 


57,131.79 


57,131.79 


0.00 


000 


BIdg. Inspector 


Expenses 


493.65 


3.072.00 


3.072.00 


3.465.91 


O.QO 


99 74 






493.65 


99.369.00 


99.401.79 


99.795.30 


0.00 


100.14 


Community Development Subtotal 


1,152.35 


406,430.00 


409,768.40 


403,027.72 


1 ,630.08 


6,262 95 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 
















Public Buildings 


Sal-Superintendent 


00 


67,289 00 


67,289 00 


67.28852 


00 


048 


Public Buildings 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


1,279,427 00 


1,279,427 00 


1,266,698 72 


0.00 


12.728 28 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


14,033.15 


195,067.00 


195,067.00 


207,77001 


1.287 44 


42 70 


Public Buildings 


Electric-Town BIdgs. 


0.00 


85,350 00 


85,350 00 


85,350 00 


0.00 


000 


Public Buildings 


Utilities-Town BIdgs. 


0.00 


61,196.00 


61,196.00 


61,196.00 


0.00 


000 


Public Buildings 


Exp-Town BIdgs. 


1,024.65 


60,390 00 


60,390 00 


61,414 65 


0.00 


000 


Public Buildings 


Exp-School BIdgs. 


0.00 


115,818.00 


115,818.00 


115,818.00 


0.00 


000 


Public Buildings 


Furn. & Equip. 


0.00 


4,200.00 


4,200.00 


4,060 89 


000 


139 11 


Public Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


3,850.64 


6,450.00 


6,450 00 


8,203.23 


0.00 


2,09741 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


9,750.00 


9,750.00 


9,418.00 


332 00 


000 


Public Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


10.000.00 


60.300 00 


70.300.00 


77.211.66 


3.088 34 


(0.00) 






28.908.44 


1.945.237.00 


1.955.237.00 


1.964.429.68 


4.707.78 


15.007 98 


Public Buildings Subtotal 


28,908.44 


1,945,237 00 


1,955,237.00 


1,964,429 68 


4.707 78 


15,007.98 


HUMAN SERVICES: 
















Veterans 


Salary 


0.00 


5,500.00 


5,500.04 


5,500 04 


0.00 


000 


Veterans 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1 ,459 09 


000 


14091 


Veterans 


Assistance 


0.00 


10.000.00 


12.500 00 


9.088 00 


000 


3.41200 






0.00 


17,100.00 


19,600.04 


16,047.13 


0.00 


3,552.91 



-156- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1996 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 








FY 96 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 






FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


Library 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


45.964.00 


45.964.00 


45,963.71 


Library 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


245,992.00 


253,612.47 


253,612.47 


Library 




0.00 


72.685.00 


72.685.00 


72.658.45 






0.00 


364,641.00 


372.261.47 


372,234.63 


Recreation 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


53.415.00 


53,415.42 


53,415.42 


Recreation 


Odi. Wllicl 


0.00 


32,720.00 


33,058.97 


33,058.97 


Recreation 


Expenses 


0.00 


2.700.00 


2.700.00 


2.083.46 






0.00 


88.835.00 


89,174.39 


88,557.85 


Elderly Services 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


41 ,206.00 


41,206.36 


41,206.36 


Elderly Services 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


41,709.00 


41,709.00 


40,368 10 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


33.488.00 


33.488.00 


31,624.44 






0.00 


116.403.00 


116.403.36 


113,198.90 


Historical Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


900.00 


980.00 


980.00 


Historical Comm. 


Expenses 


2 1 96 00 


900.00 


900.00 


2,969.16 






2,196.00 


1,800.00 


1 ,880.00 


3,949.16 


Handicapped Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


500 00 


500.00 


240.00 


Handicapped Comm. 


Expenses 


372.19 


250.00 


250.00 


0.00 






372.19 


750.00 


750.00 


240.00 


Human Services Subtotal 


2.568.19 


589,529.00 


600.069.26 


594,227.67 


EDUCATION: 












Sctiool Dept. 


Appropriation 


135,995.72 


11,723.561.00 


1 1 .798,381 .00 


11,500,601.67 


School Dept. 


Expenses 


75,573.52 


2.729.787.00 


2,804.787.00 


3.006,587.02 






211.569.24 


14,453,348.00 


14,603,168.00 


14.507,188.69 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


1.583.509.00 


1 .583.509.00 


1.579.911.00 






0.00 


1.583.509.00 


1.583.509.00 


1.579.911.00 


Education Subtotal 




211.569.24 


16,036,857.00 


16.186,677.00 


16.087.099.69 


DEBT SERVICE: 












Debt & Interest 


Schools 


0.00 


262,497.00 


262,497.00 


262,496.25 


Debt & Interest 


Gen. Government 


0.00 


384,599.00 


384,599.00 


384.599.00 


Debt & Interest 


Sewer 


0.00 


422,874.00 


443,574.00 


443.573 75 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


0.00 


952,704.00 


952,704.00 


952,703 75 


Debt & Interest 


Auth. Fees i Misc. 


0.00 


67.000.00 


17.000.00 


5.757.75 






0.00 


2.089.674.00 


2.060.374.00 


2.049,130.50 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 


0.00 


2,089,674.00 


2.060.374.00 


2,049,130.50 



AMT CFWD TO 
FY 97 FROM 
FISCAL 1996 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



126.84 
126.84 

0.00 
615.00 
615.00 
741.84 



433,775.05 
(126,226.50) 
307,548.55 

0.00 
0.00 
307,548 55 



CLOSING 
BALANCE 
029 
000 
26.55 
26.84 



0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


616.54 


0.00 


616.54 


00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,340 90 


OOP 


1 .863.56 


000 


3,204.46 


0.00 


0.00 



0.00 
0.00 

260.00 
7.19 
267.19 
7.667.94 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

3.598.00 
3.598.00 
3,598.00 



0.00 


75 


000 


000 


0.00 


025 


0.00 


025 


0.00 


11,242.25 


0.00 


11.243.50 


0.00 


11.243.50 



UNCLASSIFIED: 
Veterans' Retirement 
Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 
Medicare Employers' C ntribution 
Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 
Local Trans/Training Conf. 
Out of State Travel 
Computer Hardware & Software 
Maint. & Expenses 
Microfilm Projects 
Annual Audit 
Ambulance Billing 
Town Report 
Sewer Maintenance 
Professional & Tech. Services 
School Medicaid Billing 



0.00 


20.098.00 


20,098.00 


19.512.72 


0.00 


585.28 


0.00 


8.360.00 


16,885.00 


16.885.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


93.500.00 


118.500.00 


109.959.45 


0.00 


8.540.55 


77.00 


300,514.00 


61.214.01 


18,911.83 


0.00 


42,379 18 


200.00 


6,300.00 


6.300.00 


4,404.52 


0.00 


2,095 48 


0.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


000 


1,000 00 



8,478.04 


55.183.00 


62,683.00 


64,340.77 


6,82027 


000 


1.000.00 


1 .000.00 


1.000.00 


0.00 


1,000 00 


1 ,000 00 


0.00 


13,900.00 


13.900.00 


13,900 00 


000 


00 


0.00 


12.000.00 


12,000.00 


9,57300 


00 


2 ,427 00 


0.00 


6.000.00 


6,000 00 


5,980.00 


00 


20 00 


0.00 


32.71000 


72,710.00 


16,91701 


6,204 90 


49,588 09 


0.00 


20.000 00 


20,000.00 


1,499 57 


690 00 


17,81043 


0.00 


30,000 00 


30,000.00 


000 


000 


30,000 00 



-157- 



I k fr in 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, fWIASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1996 





AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 




AMT CFWD TO 






FY 96 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


FY 97 FROM 


CLOSING 




FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


FISCAL 1996 


BALANCE 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


100,000.00 


97,066.00 


0.00 


0.00 


97,066.00 


Insurance & Bonds 


25,000.00 


609,088.00 


539,088.00 


254,912.20 


74,481.00 


234,694.80 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


2,045,000.00 


2.067.959.51 


1,947,520.79 


120,438.72 


(0 00) 


Unclassified Subtotal 


34,755.04 


3,354,653.00 


3,146,403.52 


2,484,316.86 


209,634.89 


487,206.81 


STATUTORY CHARGES; 














Amt Cerl Coll. Tax Title 


8,631.20 


26,000.00 


51,000.00 


55,735.56 


0.00 


3,895 64 


Current Year Overlay 


0.00 


675,000.00 


666,203.00 


0.00 


0.00 


666,203.00 


Prior Year Overlay Deficit 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Retirement Contributions 


0.00 


1,074,651.00 


1,072,331.00 


1,072,331.44 


0.00 


(0.44) 


Teachers Retirement 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


County Retirement Tax 


0.00 


45,278.00 


45,991 .00 


44,867.79 


0.00 


1,123.21 


Offset Items 


000 


35,916 00 


34,764.00 


0.00 


0.00 


34,764.00 


Special Education 


0.00 


6,65200 


(1,688.00) 


0.00 


0.00 


(1,688.00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


0.00 


412,659.00 


398,300.00 


402.319.00 


0.00 


(4,019.00) 


MAPC (Ch.688of 1963) 


0.00 


4,219.00 


4,173.00 


4,173.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Excise Tax (Ch. 727 of 1962) 


0.00 


5,179.00 


11,140.00 


13,120.00 


0.00 


(1 ,980.00) 


Energy Cons. Pro. Assessment 


0.00 


19,916.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


tVletro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 


0.00 


4,646.00 


4,852.00 


4,852.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Mosquito Control Program 


0.00 


23,793.00 


23,139.00 


24,129.00 


0.00 


(990.00) 


M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 


0.00 


1 ,200,654.00 


1,142,944.00 


1,142,944.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Final Court Judgements 


0.00 


0.00 


12.000.00 


12.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


8,631.20 


3,534,563.00 


3,465,149.00 


2,776,471.79 


0.00 


697,308.41 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 














Police Dept. Cruisers 


000 


94,635 00 


94,635 00 


93,560.00 


000 


1,075.00 


Fire Dept. Diesel Exhaust Sys. 


0.00 


34,750.00 


34,750.00 


34,750.00 


0.00 


000 


Fire Dept Jaws of Life 


0.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


19,981.25 


0.00 


18.75 


Fire Dept Pickup Truck 


0.00 


17,437.00 


17,437.00 


17,437.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Div Pickup Trucks 


0.00 


27,502.00 


27,502 00 


27,262.00 


0.00 


240.00 


Highway Div Brush Chipper 


0.00 


14,490.00 


14,490 00 


14,490.00 


000 


0.00 


Public Buildings Telephone System 


25,137.27 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


25,137.27 


Public Buildings Public BIdgs Van 


0.00 


26,047.00 


26,047.00 


25,927.00 


0.00 


120 00 


Public Buildings ADA Compliance 


0.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


19,170.25 


0.00 


829 75 


School Dept Minivan 


0.00 


21,588.00 


21,588.00 


21,588.00 


0.00 


0.00 


School Dept Burner Replacement 


0.00 


18,000 00 


18,000.00 


18,000 00 


0.00 


OOP 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


25,137.27 


294,449.00 


294,449.00 


292,165.50 


0.00 


27,420.77 


WARRANT ARTICLES: 














Memorial DayA/eterans Day 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


3,868.87 


0.00 


1,131.13 


Lease Quarters-Marines.VFW, Legion 


0.00 


2,250.00 


2,250.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


750.00 


Street Acceptance 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


100.00 


Senior Tax Rebate Program 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


3,000.00 


2,000.00 


0.00 


Facilities Development Program 


0.00 


40,000.00 


40,000.00 


0.00 


40,000.00 


0.00 


G. Fuller Settlement 


0.00 


7,761.25 


7.761.25 


7.761.25 


0.00 


0.00 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 


0.00 


60,111.25 


60,111.25 


16,130.12 


42,000.00 


1,981.13 


TOTAL 


454,087.45 


36,708,781.25 


36,921,233 76 


35,386,42480 


685,418.37 


1,303.478 04 



-158- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL 



REVENUES : 

WATER RECEIVABLES RATES 
WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 
WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 
WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 
WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT. 
WATER RECEIVABLES CROSS CONN. 
WATER LIENS 
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
CAPITAL PROJECT CLOSEOUTS 
MISCELLANEOUS 
REIMBURSEMENTS 

TOTAL REVENUE: 

OPERATING COSTS 

CLOSEOUT TO MAINT. i OPERATIONS 
TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 



TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 
DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 
AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 

EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 
TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 



1993 




1994 






1995 




1996 




2,404,215 


.47 


2, 691, 225 


. 68 


2, 


681, 111 


.81 


3, 046, 538 


. 95 


11, 974 


.79 


16 ,414 


. 11 




8, 981 


. 94 


10,499 


. 00 


15,227 


. 93 


49, 644 


. 51 




31,339 


.80 


2,471 


.89 


66, 100 


.00 


85, 350 


. 00 




113, 508 


.00 


99,768 


. 80 


29, 865 


.29 


31, 112 


.29 




30, 913 


.29 


33 , 613 


. 66 


3, 840 


.00 


44 , 760 


. 00 




41, 614 


.60 


31, 633 


. 50 


95,793 


.02 


103, 708 


.26 




118,204 


. 82 


101,204 


.43 


3,448 


.48 


4,338 


.85 




3, 730 


. 53 


4, 170 


. 14 


47,465 


. 00 





. 00 







. 00 





. 00 


18,767 


.61 


31, 953 


.87 




16, 574 


.31 


21, 831 


.38 


41,710 


. 00 


63, 062 


. 53 




18,705 


. 24 





. 00 


2,738,407 


. 59 


3 , 121, 570 


, 10 


3, 


064,684, 


, 34 


3, 351, 731 


. 75 


1,712,195, 


. 10 


1,401, 187 , 


, 00 


1, 


390,448 , 


, 96 


1,686,595, 


,26 


47,465, 


.00 


0, 


, 00 




, 


,00 


, 


, 00 


1, 759, 660 , 


, 10 


1,401,187, 


, 00 


1, 


390,448 , 


, 96 


1,686,595, 


,26 


978 , 747 . 


49 


1, 720, 383 . 


10 


1, 


674,235. 


38 


1, 665, 136 . 


49 


1,298,693. 


00 


1,473, 987. 


00 


1,439, 550. 


00 


1,290,489. 


00 


(319, 945 . 


51) 


246, 396 . 


10 




234 , 685 . 


38 


374 , 647 . 


49 


383,549. 


11 


63, 603 . 


60 




309, 999. 


70 


544,685. 


08 


63, 603 . 


60 


309, 999. 


70 




544 , 685 . 


08 


919, 332 . 


57 



-159- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENT)ITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



N.E. SEWER 

SEWER INTERCEPTOR MAIN ST. 

CONSTRUCTION (ENGINEERING) SEWER 

4/23/88 4/22/89 



TOTAL 

HIGH SCHOOL (MEMORANDUM 
RENOVATION ONLY) 



Town Meeting Dates 

Initial Project Authorization 1,210,000.00 450,000.00 747,000.00 7,750,000.00 10,157,000.00 



REVENUES : 

Intergovernmental 

Total Revenue 

EXPENDITURES: 

Capital Outlay 

Total Expenditures 
Excess of revenues over/under 

expenditures 

Other Financial Sources (uses ) : 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds & Notes 
Operating transfers 

Total Other Financial 
Sources/Uses 

Excess of Revenues 

and other sources over 
(under) expenditures and 
other uses 

FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1995 

FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 19 96 



.00 
. 00 



45,479.97 
(45,479.97) 

0.00 
0.00 



(45,479 . 97) 
227, 936 . 26 
182 , 456 . 29 



. 00 
. 00 



0.00 
. 00 



. 00 



. 00 



. 00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0. 00 



. 00 
. 00 



. 00 
. 00 



. 00 



0.00 (13,002.92) 



0.00 0.00 
7,266.68 121,479.43 
7,266.68 121,479.43 



(13, 002 . 92) 
13 , 002 . 92 
. 00 



.00 
. 00 



45,479 . 97 
(45,479.97) 

. 00 
(13, 002 . 92) 



(58 , 482 . 89) 
369, 685 .29 
311, 202 .40 



-160- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 





YEAR 


YEAR 




OUTSTANDING 


BOND 


BOND 


OUTSTANDING 


DEXRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


JUNE 30, 1995 


ADDfTIONS RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30, 1996 


INSIDE DEBT LIMrr 
















Sewer Bonds 


07-77 


n7-Qfi 




OAT) nnn 


— 


80,000 


iRn nnn 


Sewer Bonds 


05-82 




Q «;-in A 






onn non 


on nnn 


Street Bonds 


11-90 


1 1 -Oft 






- 


15,000 


'jc nnn 


Remodeling 


11-90 


11-98 


6.85 


200,000 




50,000 


150,000 


Sewer - Main Street 


11-90 


11-98 


6.8-6.85 


445,000 




75,000 


370,000 


School Boilers 


11-90 


11-99 


68-6 85 


470 000 




95,000 


375,000 


Sewer-MWRA Loan 


06-95 


05-00 








103,500 


20,700 


82,'800 


Dept.Equipment-Fire 


06-95 


06-00 


5.1 





230,000 


50,000 


180,000 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMrr 






1,695,000 


333,500 


585,700 


1,442,800 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMfT 
















High School Bonds 


01-85 


01 -95 


8 












School Renovation 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


210,000 




130,000 


80,000 


Water Plant 


07-79 


07-98 


5.25 


450,000 




150,000 


300,000 


Water Plant 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


740,000 




370,000 


370,000 


Water Land Purchase 


08-92 


08-96 


4.25 


350,000 




175,000 


175,000 


Water Standpipe 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-8.85 


860,000 




140,000 


720,000 


TOTAL OLTTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 






2,610,000 





965,000 


1,645,000 



TOTAL DEBT 4,305,000 333,500 1,550,700 3,087,800 



-161- 










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-162- 



Boards Committees & Commissions 



Meeting Dates & Times 





Date 


Room 


DUX ^ AIM 




Time 




appfaTj<^ board of 


1st & 3Td Mondav 


4 


Town 1 1 


7 


: 00 


P 


m 


ARTS COUNCIL FOR THE 


2nd Wedji6sda.y 




Art«5 CpntPT" 

^ \^ \^ XX \^ ±. 


7 


: GO 


P 


m 


O Hi O O wX^O f £_}<<»/ ^^Xxi.^ 


Pnd R- 4th ThiiT"«?dav 


2 


Town Ha 1 1 

XWWli XXCl X X 


Q 
-7 


: 30 


a 


. Ill 


CARTER LECTURE FUND 


As Needed 














CFMETFRY COMMT 9 ^ TONERS 


"^rd Thi]r=?dav 

^ X X 1 1 ui X o ^>ici y 




V — due e X y 


X 


: 00 


P 


m 
. Ill 


V^WIN O HiXN. V ± X WIN V« Wl ii 1 X O O X WIN 


X O OC ^ X TV O V<LCL y 


g 


Town Hs 1 1 


7 


: 00 


P 


. \\\ 


DISABILITIES WILMINGTON COMM 


Aq Nppdpfi 

S^lJ Ai 1 ^ %v 
















T*H T*! 1 o G a 

o X LI 1 o uci y 




ox . V— cIlUCX 


X 


: 30 


P 


. m 






q 


T'OTaTTI "V^^ 1 1 
xtv'wii ncixx 


/ , 


: 00 


P 


. m 




X o L. OC o X u i'i\jix\j.ci y 


A 


i^wxi ndxx 


D , 


: 15 


P 


. m 


n X O X X 'u/AXJ V. U 1 X O O X \yL\ 


^ iiVwL I'iwiiuciy 


A 


x^wix nctxx 




:30 


P' 


. rn 


■HOTTQTMr; aiTTWORTTV 


lot" T*!! ^ C3 H ^3 ^Z" 




Xyci^uixii^ MCty 


7 , 


;30 


p. 


. m 


■ROTTCIT'Nm PaPTMFRCJ'HTP 
nwiw'oxxNw ir^\i\. X IN ^i\.on X It 


^ xi\j. j.iiLi.xo VJ.C4. y 


q 


Town "Wia T 1 


7 . 


; 30 


P' 


. m 


T.TBPaRV TRTTQTPPQ 


T*! 1 o G a 1/ 
J X U. 1 LlcoLldy 




XjX JJx ctx y 


7 . 


; 30 


p. 


. m 




Monthly 




iown hiaii 


1 ; 


: 00 


P' 


. m 


PLANNING BOARD 


1st & 3rd Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 ; 


; 30 


p. 


.m 


RECREATION COMMISSION 


1st Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


7 : 


: 00 


P- 


, m 


RECYCLING ADVISORY COMM. 


As Needed 














REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 


3rd Thursday 




Chamber Office 


7 : 


: 00 


P- 


, m 


REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 


2nd Sc 4th Tuesday 




Shaw. Tech. 


7 : 


30 


P- 


, m 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 


2nd Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


7 : 


00 


P- 


, m 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


2nd & 4th Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 : 


00 


P- 


m 


SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 


2nd & 4th Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 : 


00 


P- 


m 


TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 


As Needed 














WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 


Monthly 


AUD 


Town Hall 


6 : 


00 


P- 


m 




* * For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Arts Center 
Assessor 

Board of Selectmen Office 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Credit Union 

Department of Public Works 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Fire Prevention 
Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veteran's Agent 
Water Department 
Water Pumping Station 



Telephone Number 

694-2029 

658-5071 (Complaints) 
658-7845 (Missing/Adoption) 

657- 3887 

658- 3675 
658-3311 
658-4531 
658-3901 
658-3531 
658-5394 
658-4481 

657- 7595 

658- 4499 
658-3531 

658-3346 (Business Phone) 

9-1-1 (EMERGENCY) 
694-2006 
658-4298 
658-8531 
658-2967 

657- 4625 (TDD) 

658- 4298 
658-8238 
658-3223 
658-5071 

9-1-1 (EMERGENCY) 

657- 8368 (TDD) 

658- 3017 
658-4270 
694-6000 
658-2030 
658-3311 
694-1417 (TDD) 
658-3531 
658-2809 
694-2040 
658-3116 
658-4711 



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Boston, MA 02114 



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7593 !7 



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